Word on the Street: Peavy relieved, disturbed

Word on the Street: Peavy relieved, disturbed

Wednesday, April 20, 2011
CSNChicago.com

Peavy disturbed by latest pain

After learning that he experienced only discomfort from scar tissue stemming from his surgery to repair a detached latissimus dorsi muscle nine months ago, Chicago White Sox pitcher Jake Peavy felt an array of emotions.

"I guess it was good news, but personally disappointing for me," Peavy told reporters Wednesday in the visitor's clubhouse at Tropicana Field. "I felt I wasnt far away and was feeling so good. To feel something close to what I felt before I blew it out at the repair site (below the right shoulder) was a disturbing thing." (chicagosports.com)

Korver wants another shot at Barkley

The Bulls guard wants another chance after being caught off guard when asking TNT analyst Charles Barkley a question for their "Ask Charles" segment during Game 2.

I had to do it on the spot, Korver said Wednesday. That was the first thing that came to my mind. If I had more time to think about it, I was going to say: Ive heard you were a 6-foot-4 power forward. If thats the case, that makes you the same height as, like, Keith Bogans. So my question to you, Charles, is: If I saw you and Keith Bogans walking down the street, who would be taller?

Barkley was listed at 6-6 but said hes 6-4 . Thats about three inches shorter than Korver, who rarely ventures into the lane. (chicagobreakingsports.com)

Blackhawks fans abuse Canucks executives?

A change to the seating arrangements in the United Center for the playoffs led to the Vancouver management contingent being seated right above some of the more rabid fans in the cheap seats, and not surprisingly once the Hawks got up in the game they became quite bellicose.

And they did so using the most foul language one might imagine.

By the time your agent arrived, fully four rows of people largely dressed in Blackhawk jerseys were turned around and hurling abuse largely directed at Mike Gillis and Laurence Gilman, but everyone else seated in the box as well, including Stan Smyl and Lorne Henning.

We took it for a couple of periods before somebody got fed up and said, 'Why don't you shut up and go back to your mother's basement?' and of course that really got them going, said Gilman. It's pretty tiring hearing that over a long night. (theprovince.com)

Northwestern vs. Stanford

The Wildcats announced they will open a four-game football series with the Stanford Cardinal in 2019. The first game will be played in Evanston, then Northwestern travels to Palo Alto the following year. The two last met in 19994 when they played to a 41-41 tie. (washingtonpost.com)

NIU linebacker leaves hospital after being shot

Northern Illinois linebacker Devon Butler, who was shot in the upper back two weeks ago, was released from the hospital where he had been since April 6 to begin his recovery from the gunshot wound. His condition was serious or critical much of that time.

Any timetable for his return, if he can ever come back, remains unkown. Nobodys focusing on football with him right now, head coach Dave Doeren said. Two weeks ago, we didnt know if he was going to live. The big thing for him right now is not rushing him." (sportingnews.com)

White Sox happy to retain, and drink beer from, Crosstown Cup

White Sox happy to retain, and drink beer from, Crosstown Cup

The White Sox had a little fun with the Crosstown Cup trophy after securing it for the third consecutive year.

Well, at least one player did for sure: Left fielder Melky Cabrera, according to first baseman Jose Abreu, drank some beer out of the trophy after the White Sox beat the Cubs, 3-0, Tuesday night at U.S. Cellular Field. 

The White Sox retained the Crosstown Cup by virtue of winning the season series in 2014 (three wins, one loss), splitting in 2015 (three wins, three losses), and assuring themselves of at least a split in 2016 (two wins with two games to play). 

This isn’t like a college football rivalry trophy that gets passed between campuses every year. And baseball players generally aren't keen to over-emphasize four or six games over the course of a 162-game season. 

But the Crosstown Cup is still a trophy, and it’s one White Sox right fielder Adam Eaton appreciated receiving again. 

“Any time you win an award — I don’t care if my grandma gives me an award during checkers, I’m excited,” Eaton said. “I don’t really care. But if you play for anything there’s some extra emphasis there. I definitely do think guys take pride in it for sure. But more pride in it that our side of town is happy with us in that sense that we’ve taken the cup back. 

“You don’t want to put too much emphasis on any particular series. But at the same time, if it makes our fans happy that we got the cup back then that’s what we do.”

 

 

 

 

Bears approaching 2016 with change in attitude

Bears approaching 2016 with change in attitude

BOURBONNAIS, Ill. – When John Fox succeeded Marc Trestman as Bears coach early last year, at the top of his to-do list was changing what was a palpable losing culture that had come to hang over the organization and Halas Hall. That involved changes of personnel, practices and even to the point of placing an emphasis on winning preseason games, not simply treating them as evaluation exercises.

This year, attitude adjustment is the least of his concerns. Besides the improvements even amid a season that ended 6-10 but was within a pair of missed field goals of going past .500, the additions of critical players have brought with them exactly what Fox wants, beginning with inside linebacker Danny Trevathan, bringing a Super Bowl ring from the Denver Broncos.

“I’ve experienced a lot of new attitudes here the past few years,” said guard Kyle Long. “This is above and beyond my favorite attitude that we’ve adopted.

“People throw the word ‘culture’ around, [but] it’s just taking pride in what you’re doing. You don’t get paid to play. You get paid to win. I’ve heard John Fox say that a million times and I’m sure I’ll hear him say it 2 million times this year.”

Culture means nothing unless it translates into wins because of a collective mindset. Trevathan, linebacker Jerrell Freeman, defensive lineman Akiem Hicks, offensive linemen Ted Larsen and Bobbie Massie – all came from going to the playoffs at least twice in the past four years, Freeman and Trevathan three times.

The change was particularly evident during offseason sessions when members of the defense worked at a practice level that initially irritated some on offense, with coaches even joining in the chirping.

“I’m all about attitude and hustle and just playing ball,” said Trevathan. “I don’t care what happened before. You can always make up for it, just go 100 miles per hour and have fun.

“This game is short. Your attitude carries over to the team. There’s a lot of time when a team’s down you put your head down. I hate that. Even if we’re down we’re going to fight until the end. That’s what it’s all about, having that band of brothers and that attitude and going to, I won’t say ‘war,’ but going out there and battling together.”

[SHOP: Gear up for the 2016 season, Bears fans!

One word that surfaced from multiple players during offseason sessions was “hungry.” That was not something that was heard even as recent as last season despite the change in coaches. Without that as a starting attitude, mediocrity was not surprising in recent seasons.

“I think with this group the thing that kind of stands out is just how good a group a group of guys it is, and how important football is to them,” said quarterback Jay Cutler.

“I think you look at OTAs and you look at minicamp and you saw how competitive offense and defense and even special teams were. There weren’t any days where guys were laying off of it. Every single day, guys were getting after it trying to get better, and the competition level I felt was extremely high for being in OTAs and minicamp. Whether that’s gonna translate to wins, I guess we’ll have to wait and see.”

Bears open 2016 training camp with Pernell McPhee, two others on PUP list

Bears open 2016 training camp with Pernell McPhee, two others on PUP list

The 2015 Bears training camp began with rookie wide receiver Kevin White hampered by what would eventually become a season-ending stress fracture of his leg. The 2016 Bears will have White back in uniform but they will start training camp without one of the linchpins of their defense, placing rush-linebacker Pernell McPhee on the physically unable to perform list after he had offseason surgery on his left knee and did not participate in on-field work through final OTA’s and minicamp.

Additionally, the Bears announced that recently signed guard Amini Silatolu, coming off ACL surgery surgery, will also open camp on PUP, along with wide receiver Marquess Wilson, who injured his foot during organized team activities last month.

McPhee, the primary free-agency signing by GM Ryan Pace last offseason, was third on the Bears with six sacks but played a decreasing percentage of defensive sacks as last season wore on. He was deactivated for the St. Louis and Washington games, returned but played no more than 27 snaps in any of the final three games.

[SHOP: Gear up for the 2016 season, Bears fans!

The Bears worked to have him drop upwards of 10 pounds after playing last season at his then-customary mid-280s. That part of the program for McPhee was a success.

“He came in [at] a really good weight right now, really good shape right now,” Pace said. “We just got to acclimate himself into football activities so he’ll work with the trainers. … I know he’s been working hard over the summer so that’s very encouraging. And really in the OTAs, he wasn’t doing a lot of football stuff. He was doing stuff more on the side with our strength and conditioning coaches.”

McPhee is unlikely to play in preseason games although the Bears will not make that decision until closer to the start of games.