Word on the Street: Urlacher takes a shot at Goodell

Word on the Street: Urlacher takes a shot at Goodell

Friday, Nov. 19, 2010
CSNChicago.com

Urlacher takes a shot at Goodell

Bears linebacker Brian Urlacher kept the hits coming even though the final whistle blew on Chicago's 16-0 shutout of the Miami Dolphins Thursday night.

Urlacher, who set the franchise record for tackles in the Thursday night matchup, has not been reserved about his feelings towards the stiff fines and penalties that have been enforced this year on defensive hits, especially those involving the head of offensive players.

But Thursday, he took it a step further, calling NFL commissioner Roger Goodell a dictator.

"I don't like the rule, I don't think any defensive player likes it," Urlacher said. "It's not going to effect the way we play. We're still going to try to separate the ball from the player, that's what we do as defense. We've been taught that since we were kids, that's what we're going to try to keep doing.

"What can you do though? It's a dictatorship . . . If Goodell wants to fine you he's going to fine you, that's the way it goes and that's just the way it is." (USA Today)
Former Sox scout pleads not guilty to allegations

Jorge Oquendo Rivera, a former scout for the Chicago White Sox, pleaded not guilty to the charges that he took kickbacks from Latin American baseball prospects. David Wilder, the White Sox's former senior director of player personnel, and Victor Mateo, another former scout, were not at the arraignment, but the three are alleged to have pocketed about 400,000 over a span of more than three years. (Chicago Tribune)

Fukudome planning to stay in Chicago for a long time?

Kosuke Fukudome, the Cubs' highly-paid outfielder, just purchased a three-bedroom condo on Lake Shore Drive with his wife worth 1.44 million.

The 33-year-old former Japanese star is in the midst of a four-year, 48 million contract, having already served three of those years in the outfield of Wrigley Field. (Chicago Tribune)

NCAA Football Bowls to be filled with sub-.500 teams?

With just three short weeks left in the college football season, only 54 programs are bowl eligible. Another 39 remain in contention, but with another bowl game added to the slate this year (35 in all), 70 teams will need to qualify. If they don't, the NCAA may have to explore allowing sub-.500 teams to play.

Last season, there were only 71 bowl-eligible teams for 68 slots when the season came to a close. (Fox Sports)

Pickup football game to be played at Wrigley?

Not really, but pretty close. After the Friendly Confines was originally signed off as acceptable for the Illinois-Northwestern football game Saturday, the Big Ten announced Friday morning that the east end zone is too close to the right field wall and as such, all offensive plays, including extra points and overtime possessions will be directed at the end zone.

All kickoffs will be directed at the east end zone and after every change of possession, the ball will be repositioned for the offense to head toward the west end zone, according to CSNChicago.com Cubs Insider Patrick Mooney. (CSNChicago.com)

Rothschild inks three-year deal with Yankees

The Cubs didn't stop taking hits Friday as it was announced that pitching coach Larry Rothschild would not be coming back for 2011, as he originally reported, and would instead take his talents to the Big Apple and the Bronx Bombers.

Rothschild had already exercised his 2011 option last month and looked like he was going to be coming back for his 10th season with the Cubs, but things took a turn Friday when he was offered the position in New York. He stated family as the main reason for the change, as the Yankees train in Tampa in the spring and visit there several times a year as the Rays are in the same division. (CSNChicago.com)

NFC North: Vikings QB Teddy Bridgewater suffers dislocated knee, torn ACL

NFC North: Vikings QB Teddy Bridgewater suffers dislocated knee, torn ACL

The Minnesota Vikings announced Tuesday that franchise quarterback Teddy Bridgewater suffered a dislocated knee and torn ACL, likely ending his 2016 season before it began.

Bridgewater suffered the injury during Tuesday's practice, which was cancelled immediately following the non-contact incident. The 23-year-old quarterback was carted off the field and transported to a nearby hospital in an ambulance.

Vikings Director of Sports Medicine and Head Athletic Trainer Eric Sugarman released this statement on Bridgewater:

Teddy Bridgewater suffered a non-contact injury today at practice. The injury was quickly identified as a dislocated knee. The injury was stabilized, and he was transported to a nearby hospital for treatment and evaluation. After undergoing an MRI, it was determined that Teddy suffered a complete tear to his ACL and other structural damage. Fortunately, there appears to be no nerve or arterial damage. Surgical repair will be scheduled within the next few days. Although the recovery time will be significant, we expect Teddy to make a full recovery. I would like to thank all of the medical professionals and our athletic training staff for all of their help today. Teddy has already displayed the attitude needed to overcome this injury and attack his rehab.

Bridgewater, the Vikings' 2014 first-round draft pick, led Minnesota to their first division title since 2009 last season.

In two seasons, Bridgewater is 17-11 with 28 touchdowns, 21 interceptions with 6,150 passing yards and a 87.0 QBR.

Why the Cubs skipped Tim Tebow's showcase

Why the Cubs skipped Tim Tebow's showcase

The Cubs have built the scouting-and-player-development machine Theo Epstein promised when he took over baseball operations at Wrigley Field, assembling the game’s best team with homegrown talent, shrewd trades and big-money free agents.

The Cubs will kick the tires on just about any idea that might make the organization incrementally better, which makes their absence from Tim Tebow’s showcase on Tuesday so telling.

The Cubs skipped Tebow’s workout on the University of Southern California campus, sources said, viewing it as a promotional stunt for the former NFL quarterback and 2007 Heisman Trophy winner. With all due respect, as Joe Maddon might say, whenever the manager quotes Will Ferrell’s Ricky Bobby character in “Talladega Nights.”

Tebow’s name recognition and high-powered representation (Creative Artists Agency) helped him reportedly draw scouts from 27 major-league clubs to watch him run the 60-yard dash, react in the outfield and take batting practice.

Tebow — who won two national championships at the University of Florida, works as an ESPN analyst and stays involved with faith-based charities — hasn’t played baseball since high school.

“I saw his swing on the video — it was a decent hack,” Maddon said. “At 29 years old, it’s not easy to pull off, but good for him. If he wants to give it a run, go for it.”

White Sox closer David Robertson's foundation big part of MLB's Louisiana flood relief efforts

White Sox closer David Robertson's foundation big part of MLB's Louisiana flood relief efforts

DETROIT — David Robertson’s charitable foundation is at the head of Major League Baseball’s drive to help victims of this month’s Louisiana floods.

High Socks for Hope, which Robertson created with his wife, Erin, received a $62,500 donation on Tuesday from MLB and the Major League Baseball Players’ Association, which made a joint $250,000 contribution.

The Baton Rouge Area Foundation, which was established by former Louisiana State players, also received $62,500 and The American Red Cross got $125,000.

The Robertson’s foundation originally was formed to help victims of an April 27, 2011 tornado that rocked Tuscaloosa, Alabama and Birmingham, resulting in 64 deaths and more than 1,500 injuries.

“We’ve evolved over the years,” Robertson said. “Passing time we’ve worked toward helping a lot of the veterans and now MLB has been gracious enough to give us this donation and we’ve already got people on the ground there feeding thousands of people, both volunteers and those who are down there who have lost everything. We’re going to continue to help out as much as we can down there. We’re not a monster of an organization, but we do what we can, we stretch every dollar and with this generous donation we’re going to find a way to help those that have been affected by this terrible flood.”

[SHOP: Gear up, White Sox fans!]

White Sox pitcher Anthony Ranaudo pitched at LSU and has been active in raising funds, too.

“It’s good to see young guys getting involved in stuff like this because the game doesn’t last forever,” Robertson said. “But these charities can keep going and there’s always a chance for us to give back and we’re given so much as baseball players that it’s only fitting that we return the favor.”