On the Bandwagon? Quiz will help identify fans

On the Bandwagon? Quiz will help identify fans

Tuesday, Nov. 16, 2010
5:21 PM

By Joe Collins
CSNChicago.com

Let me fix your wagon.

Picture this. You and your dream girl (or guy) are on your first date. You know you have a hot one. A fancy dinner is planned. Your buddy hooked you up with box seats for later on that night.

Your date has a nice smile. You get ahead of yourself and start thinking about where the second date will be, how your wedding will be...and what your first child will be named. Things start off smoothly - the dinner is great, the conversation is amazing...etc.

But then when you get up to leave...she calls you by the wrong name.

Cue the 'losing horn' of failure.

Talk about a bummer, you know? Everything was going so well. You thought you established a connection with a person and then figured out they didn't read the foreward of, "Dating For Dummies." You try to overlook the faux pas but keep coming back to it again and again the rest of the night: "How can a person not remember that?

"Was it something I did? Do I detect a fraud? Is that the ultimate red flag? Do they get a second chance?"

The same is true in sports.

Maybe you have gone to a game recently and had the following happen: you're part of a large group of people wearing similar team colors. It's like date night with 60,000 of your closest friends. Everyone's having fun, high-fiving after big plays...etc. Then, the following exchange takes place with another member of your group:

You: "Wow...that kickoff return was crazy! Did you see that block? Nobody can touch 2-3 when he gets into the open field."

Other Dude: "I know man! David Hester...you are...reee-markable!"

(You can almost hear the needle scratching off the record)

You: "Mmm...y-you mean...Devin Hester is reee-diculous?"

Other Dude: (awkward silence)

Talk about the ultimate red flag.

You've been hit. Not by a smooth criminal...but by a bandwagon fan.

Bandwagon fans are the most scrutinized group in sports. And before anybody gets nervous, no, I'm not calling Bears fans - or any other group of fans - bandwagoners. But I'm guessing that a ridiculous (ha) percentage of Bears fans should know that Devin Hester was labeled "ridiculous" by announcer Jeff Joniak on an amazing return for touchdown a few years ago.

But every group of friends has "that guy" that claims a hard core allegiance to a certain team...and then, amazingly, can't remember how to pronounce the star player's name on said team...or something equally mind-boggling. The reaction by others is usually one part unintentional comedy, two parts disbelief and five more parts anger.

Bandwagon fans are always a mixed blessing for every sports franchise: they pack the stadiums and bars when teams are winning, and then usually vanish once the team falls below .500. They also add to the bottom line and make TV executives glad that they invested in the team for a prime time slot.

But on the flip side, you also get "David Hester" moments coming out of the woodwork every now and then. Personally, I don't mind bandwagoners all that much, I'm all for the awkward comedy. And in the end, there isn't all that much you can do about it but sit and wonder if these bandwagoners fake their way through other parts of life.

But maybe it's time to do something about it.

I have developed a five-question bandwagon defrauding kit for each of the major sports teams in Chicago (CubsSoxBullsBlackhawksBears). I urge you to give a suspected bandwagoner the quiz if you think heshe might be scamming you. Each set of questions is easy enough that the mildly interested fan should get without much hesitation. But they're just hard enough to force the bandwagon fans into buying the next round of drinks.

(Disclaimer: Any fan who physically goes to a game and cheers for a Chicago team or supports them in any way is a winner in my book and it doesn't matter what their sports acumen is...but still...)

CHICAGO CUBS:

--The last Cubs World Series championship came in what year?

--What Cubs outfielder won National League MVP honors in 1987?

--What Cubs pitcher threw a no-hitter against the Astros in 2008?

--What team passed the Cubs down the stretch to win the N.L. East in 1969?

--True or false: Cubs and Cardinals fans are usually the best of friends and root for each other's team.

CHICAGO WHITE SOX:

--Who was the most valuable player in the 2005 World Series?

--What was Carlton Fisk's number while playing for the White Sox?

--What shortstop won American League Rookie of the Year honors for the southsiders in 1985?

--What Sox pitcher recently won his second gold glove?

--Which Minnesota team makes the blood of a White Sox fan boil more: The Twins or St. Olaf?

CHICAGO BULLS:

--Derrick Rose went to what Chicago high school?

--After playing for the Bulls, Michael Jordan went to play for what other NBA team?

--What two players were the building blocks for the "Baby Bulls" in 2001?

--Coach Tom Thibodeau was an assistant on what team last season?

--Bill Laimbeer, a guy whose car you'd want to egg in the 1980s, was part of what nemesis team?

CHICAGO BLACKHAWKS:

--"The Golden Jet" is the nickname for what Hall of Fame Blackhawk?

--Who scored the game-winning goal in Game 6 to clinch the 2010 Stanley Cup?

--Name one player from the 1992 Chicago Blackhawks team that advanced to the Stanley Cup Final.

--True or false: The Blackhawks once made the playoffs 28 consecutive seasons.

--What "Original Six" team is considered to be the archrival to the Hawks? (Hint: They wear red, too)

CHICAGO BEARS:

--What was the final score of Super Bowl XX?

--What Chicago Bear ran back the opening kickoff for a touchdown in Super Bowl XLI?

--Where did the Bears play their home games prior to moving into Soldier Field in 1971?

--Quarterback Jay Cutler went to what university?

--True or false: Green and yellow are popular colors to be worn at Soldier Field - especially if you are in the upper level and the home team is winning 35-3 (well...I guess the answer varies depending on how you view the question).

So go get 'em, Chicago fans. See who the longtime, loyal followers are in your group.

And then locate the sheep. But go easy on them, all will be forgotten when they get the next round of drinks.

And they better.

Wake-up Call: Miggy gets the boot; Rodon's rocky debut; More bad news for Cubs?

miguel_montero_cubbies.jpg
AP

Wake-up Call: Miggy gets the boot; Rodon's rocky debut; More bad news for Cubs?

Where it all went wrong for Cubs and Miguel Montero

White Sox willing to overlook 'rough' patches as healthy Carlos Rodon returns

Kris Bryant’s sprained ankle is more bad news for Cubs: ‘You can’t cry about it’

Can Leonard Floyd break out in 2017? The Bears like the early signs

Blackhawks Talk Podcast: What's next for Blackhawks as free agency looms?

Preview: Cubs wrap up series with Nationals today on CSN

Preview: White Sox host Yankees tonight on CSN

Bulls Talk Podcast: An NBA gone wild and Zach LaVine sit down interview

How Rick Renteria has tried to help White Sox players combat travel fatigue

What pushed Theo Epstein over the edge in making Miguel Montero decision: ‘It screamed out’

 

White Sox willing to overlook 'rough' patches as healthy Carlos Rodon returns

White Sox willing to overlook 'rough' patches as healthy Carlos Rodon returns

The two fastballs that soared to the backstop on Wednesday night should give you a strong indication that Carlos Rodon was far from perfect.

But in making his first start of the 2017 season, the White Sox pitcher also offered his team plenty of signals that his health isn’t going to be an issue.

Rodon returned to the mound for the first time since last September and brought the goods that made him one of baseball’s top pitching prospects several years ago. Given he’d missed three months with bursitis in the left shoulder and the potential value he offers to a franchise only half a season into its first rebuild in 20 years, that was plenty for the White Sox to overlook the rust Rodon showed in a 12-3 White Sox loss to the New York Yankees at Guaranteed Rate Field.

“He started a little rough early obviously, got some high pitch counts,” manager Rick Renteria said. “And then he kind of settled down.

“Having him back in the rotation and getting him back out there on the big league field, coming out of there feeling good, healthy. I'm sure he will continue to get better as he continues to get out there and move forward.”

Renteria said he wasn’t surprised that Rodon struggled with his command as much as he did against the Yankees. The issues the pitcher displayed in uncorking a pair of wild pitches, walking six batters and throwing strikes on only 41 of 94 pitches were also present during Rodon’s four rehab starts in the minors.

But as long as the stuff was there, the White Sox would be OK with any issues that accompanied the performance. Rodon began to alleviate those concerns immediately when he earned a called strike on the game’s first pitch with a 93-mph fastball to Brett Gardner. Featuring a four-seamer with an absurd amount of movement and a nasty slider he struggled to control, Rodon checked all the boxes the White Sox hoped for from a pitcher they believe will be a frontline starter for years to come. Rodon also was pleased by how he felt before, during and after the contest.

“I was pretty excited,” Rodon said. “I was going a little fast in the first. But it was good to be out there. Next time out, it’ll hopefully be a little better. Arm feels good, body feels good, all you can ask for.”

Well, it’s not ALL you can ask for, but it’s pretty damn good out of the gate given how slow Rodon’s return took. His four-seam fastball averaged 94.9 mph according to BrooksBaseball.Net and touched 97 mph. His two-seamer averaged 94.4 mph and touched 95. And his slider, though he couldn’t control it, nor locate it for a strike, averaged 86 mph.

“You could see (Omar Narvaez) going over to try to catch some balls that were having tremendous run,” Renteria said. “That's (Rodon). He's got some tremendous life, he's just trying to harness it the best that he can and being able to execute where he wants to get as many strikes as possible.”

[VIVID SEATS: Get your White Sox tickets here]

The strikes were about the only thing Rodon didn’t bring with him. He walked Gardner to start the game and issued two more free passes after a Tim Anderson error allowed a run to score and extended the first inning. Rodon threw 37 pitches in the first, only 15 for strikes.

He also reached a full count to each of the batters he faced in the second inning. Rodon walked two more with two outs in the third inning after he’d retired six batters in a row.

And there were those pesky first-inning wild pitches that resembled something out of ‘Bull Durham.’

But all in all, Rodon and the White Sox ultimately saw enough in the first outing to be pleased.

“Great stuff, great life, but the goal is to put it in the zone and let them swing it to get guys out early,” Rodon said. “That’s not what happened. I’ll get back to that.”

“It’s a tough loss, but it’s better to be with the guys out on the field grinding than sitting on the couch and watching, for sure.”