Bears not OK with Allen's hit on Louis

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Bears not OK with Allen's hit on Louis

When Minnesota defensive end Jared Allen leveled guard Lance Louis with a blindside hit on which Allen launched himself at Louis head, Allen wasnt penalized, although he may be fined by the NFL.

Im sure the league will look at it and give another opinion about what they think, coach Lovie Smith said on Monday.

Whatever the punishment, the Bears were critical of Allen and the hit that resulted in a knee injury to the young guard. They didnt use the word dirty but it was there between the lines.

I saw the play, said defensive end Israel Idonije. It wasnt necessary. There have been a number of rules put in the game now that you cant hit a defenseless player. Lance is clearly, his vision is downfield. Allen hits him on his blind side.

At that point of the game, he could have easily shoulder to shoulder, he could have laid him out with just using his hands to his chest. Lot of options. Lance is quick. Hes fast. But its not a situation where he was just blazing and Allen had to lay him out to make a saving play. He hit him that way because he chose to hit him that way.

Typically players and coaches do not publicly criticize opponents for their hits, say, by an Ndamukong Suh on Jay Cutler. The blows are dismissed as part of the game.

Not this one.

Did Smith view the hit as unnecessary?

Unnecessary? Yes. I did, Smith said. Jared Allen plays the game a certain way, a good player in our league. I think there are some plays when you look at them again, you say, Hey, we could have done without that.

I think our game could do without that play. We have an injured player right now based on it. I think he could have gotten blocked a little bit differently, but thats about all I can probably say about it.

After getting shut down by Buck Farmer, White Sox ninth-inning rally falls short

After getting shut down by Buck Farmer, White Sox ninth-inning rally falls short

The White Sox offense finally came alive in the ninth inning. But it came one run short of completing an epic last-ditch comeback.

The White Sox were silenced by Detroit Tigers starting pitcher Buck Farmer and went to the ninth inning down 4-0. But the South Siders woke up at the last minute for three runs, only to fall with the tying run on third base in a 4-3 decision at Guaranteed Rate Field, the second game of Saturday's doubleheader.

Down a quartet of runs heading to the bottom of the ninth, Jose Abreu led off with a double, and two batters later, Matt Davidson singled, putting runners at the corners with one out. Abreu came home when Tim Anderson singled up the middle, and Davidson and Anderson both scored on Yolmer Sanchez's triple into the right-field corner to make it a one-run game. But Todd Frazier and Adam Engel struck out with Sanchez 90 feet away to end the game.

[WHITE SOX TICKETS: Get your seats right here]

Prior to the late-inning dramatics, the White Sox couldn't do a thing offensively, mostly thanks to the efforts of Farmer, who struck out 11 in his 6.1 shutout innings. He allowed only three hits and two walks in his first appearance of the 2017 season.

White Sox starter Derek Holland allowed just one run and struck out eight but left trailing 1-0. The Tigers scored three more runs off the White Sox bullpen thanks to a sacrifice fly, a wild pitch and a Victor Martinez solo home run.

White Sox courting of Luis Robert leads to 'Christmas in May'

White Sox courting of Luis Robert leads to 'Christmas in May'

When he learned last November that elite talent Luis Robert could be available by June 15, Marco Paddy didn’t hold back: It was time for the White Sox make their move.

Much like with Yoan Moncada before, the team’s international scouting director had an extensive history scouting Robert, who on Saturday signed with the White Sox after he received a $26 million signing bonus. After watching him for five years, Paddy believed in Robert enough to recommend the White Sox pay several severe penalties to sign a player the franchise thinks could be an everyday center fielder with power.

By signing Robert, 19, the White Sox must not only pay a luxury tax of almost equal value to the bonus, but they’re also unable to sign any international prospect for more than $300,000 in each of the next two classes. But given the limited competition and the unique talent he saw, Paddy let the White Sox know Robert -- a potential top-30 prospect in baseball -- was a player they couldn’t afford to bypass. Thus begun the team’s courtship, one the Cuban cited as having a major impact on his desire to sign with the White Sox. Now, the White Sox not only have Moncada after trading for him in December, but they also have another potential cornerstone to build around.

“From the beginning we were very serious about it,” Paddy said. “Knowing we weren’t going to have 29 other clubs competing against us was a good thing for us because we knew our competition pool was a lot smaller. We went in it with everything we had and if we missed out on some guys that’s fine, that’s the risk you take.

“It’s a dream come true to be honest with you, having those guys with that kind of ability together. There’s still a lot of work that needs to be done. But I saw Moncada about the same age I saw Robert and it’s like Christmas in May.”

The pursuit of Robert -- a player general manager Rick Hahn describes as a “dynamic, potential talent” -- began in December at the winter meetings at National Harbor, Md. Having learned that Robert would potentially be a late addition to the 2016-17 international class, Paddy asked for a meeting with Hahn, executive vice president Kenny Williams and chairman Jerry Reinsdorf. Paddy and Hahn had previously held several similar state-of-the-international-picture meetings to determine when to make a splash on the market.

This was different.

“Marco approached us and said, ‘This is the guy,’ ” Hahn said.

It was still a “what if” proposition because Robert not only had to establish residency, but he also had to receive clearance from Major League Baseball to be part of the 2016-17 class, a critical factor. Under the old Collective Bargaining Agreement, teams could spend whatever they wanted on a player as long as they paid a luxury tax. But under the new CBA, teams are limited to a maximum of $5.25 million for bonuses.

While the White Sox felt Paddy’s familiarity with Robert would give them a chance if he wasn’t eligible until July 2 (the next class), they knew they’d compete against fewer teams for his services under the old rules. Hahn said back in March the White Sox intended to be a player either way. On Saturday, he said it was Paddy’s initial determination that spurred him into action.

“Marco personally was willing to suffer the penalties that it has on his world for the betterment of the organization,” Hahn said. “Marco’s evaluation and presence and willingness to sacrifice potential future signings for this reinforced the notion that this was the right move to make.”

Then everyone else got involved and the White Sox went overboard to recruit Robert.

If Saturday’s pregame presentation is any indication, the White Sox pulled out all the stops.

As Robert was introduced for his press conference, he sat in front of banners featuring current and former White Sox from Cuba, including Alexei Ramirez, Minnie Minoso, Jose Abreu and Moncada.

Once he was on the field to throw out the first pitch, the team played a short video that was filmed Friday night on the scoreboard with numerous White Sox fans welcoming Robert to Chicago. As Robert trotted to the mound to throw his pitch to Abreu, team employees stood atop the home dugout with a sign that read “bienvenidos” and holding Cuban flags.

But the post-signing efforts were nothing compared to the team’s full-court press of Robert last month.

[MORE: Luis Robert will start journey through White Sox organization in Dominican Summer League]

Hahn and Williams brought several showstoppers with them when they traveled to the Dominican Republic for a private workout with Robert last month. Included were a power point production and an iPad with a video presentation that the White Sox communications department put together in six days, Hahn said. Manager Rick Renteria narrated the short video in Spanish and it included personal messages for Robert from Abreu, Moncada and Michael Ynoa, who shares the same trainer (Edgar Mercedes) and worked out with Robert in the offseason.

“It was a beautiful video,” Robert said through an interpreter. “The part (that stood out) the most was when Ricky Renteria was talking straight to me, saying they need me here to win several championships.”

But more than the video, Robert said the desire displayed by the White Sox made his decision easy. Hahn said the White Sox felt confident heading into the final 24 hours that they were in the lead for Robert. Not only had they bid aggressively, Hahn thought the White Sox made a strong pitch. That feeling only increased last Saturday morning when Robert changed his Instagram avatar to a picture of him wearing a White Sox cap.

“The video helps a lot, but the thing that made me make a decision was who was the team that showed more interest,” Robert said. “That was something that made me feel good.”

Paddy had seen enough in five years to feel confident in pushing the White Sox to be a player for Robert.

He first scouted Robert at the under-15 Pan American Championships in 2012 in Chihuahua, Mexico. Paddy’s interest in the 6-foot-3, 175-pound center fielder only grew as Robert matured physically. Paddy suspected that once Hahn and Williams would be on board once they saw the passion with which Robert played.

Robert described himself on Saturday as player who likes to fight and “give all that I have for my team.” Paddy said it wasn’t a difficult call to push Hahn when he considered the player’s tools and makeup, as well as the last opportunity to spend big on an international talent.

“You put all those things together, it becomes easy,” Paddy said. “As I watched him over the years grow, get stronger and get better, it became evident to me that if we had an opportunity to sign this guy, it would be a good thing for the organization.

“The level of ability, the tools that I saw that he had, and the past and now present, it’s something you don’t see every day.”