Tom Izzo calls Michigan State's performance 'humiliating' after loss to Penn State

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Tom Izzo calls Michigan State's performance 'humiliating' after loss to Penn State

After a strong start to Big Ten play that saw wins over Minnesota, Northwestern and Rutgers, Michigan State got back in the loss column Saturday.

It was a unique game not just because Penn State beat Michigan State, something that hadn't happened since March 2011. The Spartans and Nittany Lions clashed in the Palestra, the famous Philadelphia arena that's been hosting college hoops games since the 1920s.

The arena's legacy is so impressive that it's dubbed the Cathedral of College Basketball.

The setting seemed to make Saturday's 72-63 loss by Michigan State sting even more for head coach Tom Izzo, who let his team have it in his postgame press conference, calling the Spartans' effort "humiliating" and apologizing to the fans and even the building.

"This was humiliating for me to be in such a great city and in a great basketball venue, and our players did not play and I didn't have our players ready to play," Izzo said, his comments published by MLive.com. "The whole thing falls on me. But I'm just so tired of trying to explain why I don't see the daylight at the end of tunnel. I see us getting better, and then the minute I say it, we take that for granted.

"My apologies to this magnificent facility. ... I feel like we cheated those of you who have seen great teams and great coaches and great players play here. You got robbed today."

Penn State led for pretty much the whole game and shot better (46.4 percent compared to 41.1 percent). The Lions scored 16 points off 17 turnovers by the Spartans. Penn State had a 38-28 rebounding edge.

All those things drove Izzo nuts.

"I am embarrassed that in a city where basketball is like this that my team would play like they did in that first half," Izzo said. "We guarded nobody. We played with no energy. I was totally frustrated with the way we played. I guess I'm going to have to live with some of it and that's the problem with freshmen — up and down. But it was very discouraging."

Izzo started all four of his highly touted freshmen in Saturday's game. Miles Bridges played in his second game back from an ankle injury, and the rust has most definitely not worn off, Izzo evaluating his star at around 80-percent health.

But Bridges' effort was as much a topic of conversation as his health. This from MLive.com's Brendan F. Quinn:

Multiple times, Bridges was caught standing and watching, instead of running and rebounding. He missed one loose ball in the second half and got blistered on the court by junior point guard Tum Tum Nairn, and then sent to the bench.

But it sounds like Bridges was hardly the only one in green and white not to live up to Izzo's expectations.

And that's becoming an upsetting season-long theme for a program that annually challenges not just for conference championships but for a national championship.

This was the sixth loss of the season for Izzo's crew and the second that's come in somewhat embarrassing fashion. Non-conference losses to Arizona, Kentucky, Baylor and Duke could be excused due to the quality of the competition. But this loss to Penn State feels a little more like the defeat at the hands of Northeastern than it does other of those aforementioned losses.

This doesn't yet seem like your typical Izzo team, and while there's still time to iron these issues out, questions of effort and readiness with a young roster might linger long enough to yield a far less rosier than usual outlook for Michigan State come March.

Urban Meyer: Big Ten is 'night and day what it was' when he took over at Ohio State

Urban Meyer: Big Ten is 'night and day what it was' when he took over at Ohio State

The Big Ten finally got a heaping helping of national respect last season, when three of the conference's teams finished in the top six of the final College Football Playoff rankings.

It had been a bit of a challenge in previous seasons — and not always without merit — for the league to get talked about in the same way the national media loves talking about the SEC. But now the conference boasts some of the healthiest programs in college football and some of the most attention-grabbing head coaches in the sport.

Certainly Urban Meyer and his Ohio State Buckeyes fall into those categories. But Ohio State is joined in the highest levels of national conversation by Jim Harbaugh's Michigan program and Paul Chryst's stellar work at Wisconsin. That's without mentioning the reigning conference champion Penn State Nittany Lions and Mark Dantonio's oft-contending Michigan State program.

With the Big Ten now annually having several national championship-caliber teams, Meyer can't help but notice how the league and the league's status has changed since he took the head-coaching gig in Columbus ahead of the 2012 season.

"It's night and day what it was," Meyer told CSN's Pat Boyle at Monday's Golf.Give.Gala in St. Charles, hosted by Michael Phelps and Jason Day. "And I was actually shocked at the disrespect and the lack of respect that the Big Ten had. I never looked at that. I grew up here.

"There's a lot of reasons why that's happened. The schools have hired very good coaches, the recruiting is off the chart now compared to the way it used to be. There's a lot of credit. And you better show up every week now, and it wasn't that way when I first got there in 2012."

Meyer's Buckeyes are again expected to be in the championship hunt this fall after reaching the College Football Playoff in two of the past three seasons and winning the whole thing to cap the 2014 campaign.

Certainly, though, the conference's powerhouses aren't the only programs that have contributed to the league's health as a whole. Coaching hires since Meyer got to Ohio State include former NFL head coaches in Lovie Smith and Mike Riley, as well as high-profile up-and-comers like James Franklin and P.J. Fleck.

Add those names to the already-existing leaders like Meyer, Dantonio and Northwestern's Pat Fitzgerald, and the coaching is as strong as any conference in the country.

On the latest episode of 'Harbaugh Being Harbaugh,' Michigan football coach helps deliver a calf

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On the latest episode of 'Harbaugh Being Harbaugh,' Michigan football coach helps deliver a calf

Harbaugh gonna Harbaugh, guys. That's just how the Michigan football coach rolls.

You might remember that Jim Harbaugh has an endorsement deal with a milk brand — because of course he does — and stars in a commercial for fairlife milk in which he breaks down the tape of his wife, Sarah, pouring some fairlife milk for the couple's kids.

You can watch it right here. It's actually pretty funny.

Well, as part of Harbaugh's relationship with fairlife, he got to visit Fair Oaks Farms in Indiana, a spot you know well if you've ever traveled down I-65 en route to Indianapolis.

While visiting the farm, Harbaugh got his hands dirty — or maybe not, he seems to be wearing gloves — while helping to deliver a calf.

Yeah, that's right. Jim Harbaugh helped deliver a calf.

This comes as little surprise to those who know Harbaugh's antics well. He's always up to something ridiculous, be it reciting lines from "Gladiator" in Rome, shouting for peanuts in the middle of a mall or starring in a Michigan-themed rap video.

While Harbaugh's known for asking his players, "Who's got it better than us?" he can definitely answer with confidence "Who has more fun than he does?"

Keep it coming, coach.