Blackhawks breakdown: Sean O'Donnell

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Blackhawks breakdown: Sean O'Donnell

Over the next five weeks, CSNChicago.com Blackhawks Insider Tracey Myers and PGL host Chris Boden will evaluate the 2011-12 performance of each player on the Hawks roster. One breakdown will occur every weekday in numerical order.

Sean O'Donnell, 40, appeared in 51 games and averaged 13 minutes and 31 seconds of ice time per game. He did not score a goal and finished with seven assists. O'Donnell registered 46 hits, 44 blocked shots and 23 penalty minutes while finishing minus-6. He played in Games 1 and 4 of the playoff series vs. Phoenix, failing to record a point while going minus-3 with one hit and two blocked shots.

Boden's take: ODonnell and the coaching staff found themselves in a Catch-22 situation with the 40-year-old defenseman. They wanted him for depth, and the price (850,000) was right for a veteran of 104 playoff games, including a Stanley Cup. But they also wanted to preserve him from injury so he could be available for what was expected to be a longer postseason run. Whether ODonnells game simply slipped noticeably from his previous 15-plus NHL seasons or he just couldnt get into the right rhythm by suiting up for just 51 games, it didnt work out. You could see what the Hawks were thinking with the move, but the spot duty resulted in spotty play. He was a good voice for the locker room, and became the wise spokesman on more than one occasion even when he wasnt playing regularly. Hes an interesting guy to listen to, always willing to share his thoughts when asked, drawing on an NHL career that began in 1994-95 with the Los Angeles Kings.

Myers' take: Another veteran the Blackhawks hoped would bring depth to the defensemen corps, ODonnell did that for part of the season. Bringing more than 1,000 career games and Cup experience, ODonnell was a great locker-room presence. But on the ice, it looked like the seasons were catching up to ODonnell. Theres no doubting his hockey smarts, but time has slowed him.

2012-13 Expectations

Chris: Like another veteran brought in to fill a more regular role up front in Andrew Brunette, ODonnells Blackhawks career will be one-and-done. Their salary cap space will be more limited than a year ago, requiring greater impact in the depth they need to add this time around.

Tracey: Will the 40-year-old ODonnell play another NHL season? Thats uncertain at this point. Either way, it seems unlikely that hell play another game in a Blackhawks uniform. ODonnell is a great ambassador of the game; and if his playing days are over, hed make a great front-office presence for someone.

How do you feel about this evaluation? As always, be sure to chime in with your thoughts by commenting below.

Previously: Duncan Keith, Niklas Hjalmarsson, Steve Montador

Up next: Brent Seabrook

Go behind the scenes with Kendall Gill at The Big 3 in Chicago

Go behind the scenes with Kendall Gill at The Big 3 in Chicago

CSN Chicago's Bulls analyst Kendill Gill played in The Big 3 in Chicago's UIC Pavilion on Sunday and gave CSN some inside access.

Gill was mic'd up in warm-ups and talked to CSN's Mark Schanowski after the game. Gill's Team Power picked up another win to improve to 3-1.

Watch the video above to see the behind the scenes footage and the interview with Schanowski.

With mysterious injury behind him, Kyle Hendricks has returned to the Cubs and brought jokes

With mysterious injury behind him, Kyle Hendricks has returned to the Cubs and brought jokes

Kyle Hendricks has returned at the turn of the tide for the Cubs and he brought his sense of humor.

Hendricks hasn't pitched since June 4 and is slated to return to the Cubs rotation Monday against the White Sox after missing the last seven weeks with inflammation in his pitching hand.

Basically, his middle finger hurt every time he threw certain pitches.

"That's probably the problem — flipping the bird to people," he joked. "Maybe it's too much driving in Chicago, I don't know."

Joe Maddon cracked up when he found out his stoic pitcher delivered a joke.

"He didn't say that. He did? That's very tongue-in-cheek, Dartmouth-in-cheek, right?" Maddon said. "He's like the most mild-mannered, wonderful fellow. It's just such an awkward injury to get and come back from.

"Right now, he's feeling great. [Cubs trainer PJ Mainville] feels really good about it, also. I think his velocity was up a bit also in the minor leagues in a couple starts. All that are good indicators. An unusual injury, but we're happy to have him back."

Kris Bryant injured his finger diving into third base Wednesday, but only missed one full game, using his freakish healing powers to do what Hendricks struggled to do in a month.

"100 percent [wish I could heal like Bryant]," Hendricks said with a smile. "I wish it wasn't the middle finger. If it was another finger, maybe it would've been easier. But a lot of things you wish, I guess, at the outset.

"But you just have to look at it — it was what it was and I'm done with it now. Now just go play."

The finger/hand injury is still largely a mystery to both Hendricks and the Cubs. They don't know how it popped up, beyond just excessive throwing (including pitching into November last season). 

He said he felt the issue pop up right before he went to the disabled list and it affected him every time he threw his curveball or sinker, because he used his middle finger more on those pitches. But with his changeup and four-seamer, there was next to no pain.

Moving forward, Hendricks will still throw the curve and sinker just as much in bullpens, but he will cut back on how much he throws overall in between starts, etc. It's too early to address the offseason, but Hendricks — who likes to throw a lot during the winter — will likely have to fine-tune that as well.

Hendricks returns right as the Cubs have appeared to turn their season around. They won the first six games coming out of the All-Star Break and after a rough loss against the Cardinals Friday, pulled off an epic, 2016-esque comeback Saturday vs. St. Louis.

The Cubs trotted out Jose Quintana Sunday and will do the same with Hendricks Monday, making it back-to-back starts from guys who weren't a factor in the Cubs rotation for most of June and July.

"I understand the cliche, but it's actually true this time [that players coming off the DL gives a team a boost]," Maddon said. "To get these two guys coming on board at this time in the season. 

"Getting Kyle back with this particular group is really interesting to watch right now. I think that's also gonna be a shot in the arm with the group, just like Jose in Baltimore. You definitely could feel the difference in attitude and I think when Kyle takes the mound, you're gonna feel the same thing, too."

Immediately after hitting the DL, Hendricks had to endure weeks of doing nothing and waiting around until the inflammation subsided. Then he spent the next few weeks building his arm strength back up after going so long without throwing. 

"It's just an obstacle and you have to look at it as positive in a way," he said. "I used it to get my body in shape, get my cardio going, get my shoulder work and my arm strong. Just try to take every positive out of it that I could. 

"Take a little breather in a way, too. Get away from it. But now, I'm ready to go. Mentally, definitely need this, need to be back and need to have baseball back in my life."

Hendricks and the Cubs are also optimistic his time off could mean he's strong for the stretch run.

Maddon and Co. had been looking for ways to bring the starting pitchers along slowly this season after pitching so many innings so deep into last fall.

The starters were held back in spring training, have been held under 100 pitches in most outings this season and get an extra day off whenever possible.

"The guys are all grinding it out while I'm sitting here getting healthy," Hendricks said. "They're wearing down a little bit, so the guys that are healthy by the end of the year, they can provide a little extra for us."