Are student athletes becoming a thing of the past?


Are student athletes becoming a thing of the past?

And with the first pick in the 2013 NFL draft, the Oakland Raiders select 6-5 260 pound Robert Nkemdiche (the nations 1 ranked HS player in the Class of 2013), a defensive end from Grayson High School in Loganville, Georgia.

Although this isn't possible, the trend of NCAA superstars foregoing their final years of college eligibility is growing at a rapid rate and it's beginning to make me think that we are missing the point behind college athletics.

The NFL rulebook states that a player is eligible to enter the draft once they have been out of high school for three years, but no part of that rule states you must attend college in any capacity. In the 2007 NFL draft, there were 38 players who decided to fore go one or more year of collegiate eligibility and enter the draft early. With the exception of 2009, this number has risen every year, reaching an unprecedented 65 early entries this past draft. In the first round alone, 19 of the 32 picks had remaining NCAA eligibility, including 10 of the top 12. Obviously these players are physically ready to play in the NFL, but are they well enough prepared as individuals?

To no surprise, the term "student-athlete" is dying at the Division I level. With the exception of the few players like Robert Griffin III, the majority of players electing to enter the draft early have not finished their college degrees. But between lavish bowl game trips, television interviews, shopping for those glittery watches, attending the draft in New York, and practicing their handshakes with commissioner Goodell, where do they find time to write that sociology paper due Monday? The fact of the matter is the NFL has fully implemented its business-driven tendencies into the NCAA.

Many of these super-star athletes are also lured into an early departure from their universities by the big check waiting for them on the other side of the stage at Radio City Music Hall. While this may seem like the right choice for a player trying to preserve his health while furthering his success in the sport, it very well may not be. The National Football League Players Association reports that players with degrees make between 20 and 30 percent more money throughout their careers. On top of that, the college graduates last 50 percent longer than early entries in the league. So, for college standouts looking for their first big pay day, the cash-in-now approach may not be wisest in the long-term. Lets face it, these are 21 and 22 year-old men who are still maturing both physically and mentally.

Out of the 65 early entries this year, 20 young men were left to test the unforgiving waters of undrafted free agency. According to the NFLPA, even if they were selected, the average NFL career only lasts 3.3 years. So when the rug gets pulled out from under their feet, how many players actually decide to go back and finish their degree?

According to a recent US government study only 55 percent of all Division 1-A players graduate.

The NCAA must hold every athlete to a certain academic standard so that their futures off the field are secured by an education. Players, even superstars, need to be prepared for life after football, because as we have seen, it can be a scary experience when the days in uniform come to an end.
Joe Musso contributed to this article.

Joe Maddon's mom could miss Game 3 of World Series at Wrigley due to delayed flight

Joe Maddon's mom could miss Game 3 of World Series at Wrigley due to delayed flight

The Cubs are hosting their first World Series game since Oct. 10, 1945 tonight, and there's an important family member that may not be in the stands for it.

Joe Maddon's mom, Beanie, was expected to be in attendance, but that's now in jeopardy after Maddon told reporters prior to the game that her flight from Philadelphia to Chicago was delayed due to an aircract that caught fire at O'Hare airport Friday afternoon.

[SHOP: Buy a "Try Not to Suck" shirt with proceeds benefiting Joe Maddon's Respect 90 Foundation & other Cubs Charities]

Operations have resumed, but it's unclear whether her flight will arrive in time for her to make Game 3 when the Cubs battle the Cleveland Indians.

Indians embrace potentially hostile Wrigley Field conditions for Game 3

Indians embrace potentially hostile Wrigley Field conditions for Game 3

With the city drunk on Cubs fever, the Cleveland Indians expect to face hostile conditions when storied Wrigley Field hosts its first World Series game since 1945 on Friday.

But Indians manager Terry Francona said the potential for an unreceptive atmosphere shouldn’t intimidate his club. Francona said Thursday that the makeup of the Indians, a group flush with veterans and and confident young stars, should help the team manage itself in the potentially Unfriendly Confines in Game 3 of the 2016 World Series. Josh Tomlin faces the Cubs Kyle Hendricks in the contest, which begins at 7:08 p.m. CST.

“It will be a tremendous atmosphere,” Francona said. “I don’t think there’s going to be a ton of people cheering for us. But then that’s where it comes in the feeling in the clubhouse because it is going to be us against the world (Friday), but us is pretty good. We have a good feeling. Everybody in there protects everybody else and takes care of everybody else.”

Wrigley Field promises to offer a surreal setting on Friday.

 The Cubs have never played a game this late in the calendar year and they haven’t been to this far in the postseason for several generations.

Fans were lined up for the Cubby Bear as early as 5 a.m. and other local watering holes reached full capacity 4-5 hours before first pitch with patrons paying ridiculous cover charges just to be able to watch the game live from Wrigleyville.

[SHOP: Buy a "Try Not to Suck" shirt with proceeds benefiting Joe Maddon's Respect 90 Foundation & other Cubs Charities]

Still, Cleveland isn’t unprepared for insane playing conditions. The Indians won their only game at always electric Fenway Park in the American League Division Series and then emerged victorious in two of three games at the insanely loud Rogers Centre in front of crowds of 49,507 and 48,800. Veteran first baseman Mike Napoli said he hoped the Indians might face the Cubs in the World Series just so he could experience Wrigley Field in October.

“It's a park you want to come to and play,” Napoli said. “I watched when they clinched to go to the World Series and how crazy it was and seeing the fans in the streets where they had to have police escorts. You could just see the crowd just part ways.

“So it's going to be fun. It's something that I wanted to be a part of, and thought that it would be an unbelievable World Series.”