Forte OK with franchise tag

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Forte OK with franchise tag

On Thursday, Matt Forte said he would be fine the Bears slapping the franchise tag on him if leads to a long-term deal in the future. Last offseason Forte turned down a contract from the team that was worth 13 to 14 million in guaranteed money.

Forte talked to WMVP-AM 1000 about the franchise tag.

"It depends on the motive. If they are doing the franchise tag just to get more time in order to negotiate a long-term deal, then I would be OK with it. But, if it's just to hold me another year and just, 'Let's throw some money at home right now to keep him quiet,' that's not going to solve anything," Forte said.

On Tuesday, Bears CEO Ted Phillips called into Chicago Tribune Live to talk about Forte's status and mentioned that he isn't going to let him hit free agency:

Forte mentioned that his agent has spoken with new Bears GM Phil Emery and is hopeful a long-term deal gets done.

"I would expect a new GM to affect the talks positively. As we all know when Jerry was here we didn't get a deal done. He's not here anymore, but I would expect it to go positively because we have more time to negotiate a new deal. Hopefully if we don't reach a deal by the time the franchise tag has to be placed, if they do franchise me it's in order to get a deal done," Forte said.

Last season, Forte finished with 997 rushing yards, 490 receiving yards and four total touchdowns. His season was cut four games short after suffering a sprained right medial collateral ligament in the team's loss to Kansas City on Dec. 4.

Chicago has until Feb. 20 to make a decision on using the franchise tag on Forte.

Bears make front office changes

Bears make front office changes

The Bears announced in a press release on Wednesday that the team has made numerous changes in their front office this offseason.

One such move included the hiring of Brandon Faber as the VP of Communications. Faber was with the Blackhawks communications department since 2008, where his most recent position was Senior Director of Communications and Community relations. 

"The club created a new executive layer of SVP’s to better lead and develop various areas of business with a focus on innovation & strategy," the release detailed. "The club promoted Scott Hagel, Karen Murphy, Cliff Stein and Lee Twarling to the newly created SVP level. The Bears have also added three new members to the VP level, promoting Doug Carnahan to VP of Corporate Partnerships and Jake Jones to VP of Finance and hiring Brandon Faber as the VP of Communications."

Hagel has been promoted to SVP, Marketing and Communications after 20 years with the Bears. Murphy has been promoted to SVP, Business Strategy and CFO. She has been with the Bears for 17 years.

Stein has been with the Bears for 14 years and has been promoted to SVP and General Counsel. He is the legal advisor for all of the club.

Twarling, who has been with the club for 12 years, has been promoted to SVP, Sales and Customer Relations. 

Food for thought on Bears training camp

Food for thought on Bears training camp

Bear-ly Possible?  Maybe Not…

As the Bears prepare to take the field for the first time in Training Camp-apalooza 2016, we present a little food for thought here that Leonard Floyd was too full to finish.  As Ryan Pace continues to build this roster, this team’s injury margin for error remains smaller than the Minnesotas, Green Bays, Carolinas, Seattles and Arizonas of the NFC.  Idle football off-season minds can start working with actual news and reality as teams charge toward the first full week of September.  But here are a few thoughts about this team that’ve passed between my ears over the past week or so, and you can decide whether I should’ve slathered the top of my head with sunscreen, too.

2nd and 3rd before 1st

As we anxiously await Saturday’s first contact practice at camp to see how Leonard Floyd stands up to attacking NFL linemen, the thinking here is guard Cody Whitehair and defensive linemen Jonathan Bullard will play a greater role for the Bears this season than their top draft pick.  Even with his role simplified compared to what it was at Georgia, there’s still a physical and mental learning curve that might not be as steep for the two guys in the trenches.  Whitehair started for four years at Kansas State, Bullard the equivalent of three at Florida, and many scouts believed both could’ve been drafted even higher than where they landed with the Bears.  I’m still confident Vic Fangio can turn Floyd into the player the team projects, and will make some impact plays in 2016.  I just think the steadier contributions will come from the other two.

White will be a Beast

….eventually.  Call him an “advanced” rookie because he had to settle for just being around the team, getting a knack for NFL life, as well as mental playbook reps and a month of actual on-field practice.  And that will help him now.  He had an big-target NFL body before his injury a year ago and that size and speed figures to win a lot of battles down the road, along with his share this season.  But his limited route tree he had at West Virginia has to grow, and how quickly that happens immediately affects the level of his impact this fall.  Is 65 to 70 catches (4-plus per game) too much to ask?  If….if…he, Alshon Jeffery, Eddie Royal and Zach Miller don’t miss significant time and those weapons are available options all season, White’s numbers could exceed that.

Top 10 “D”

Consider Coordinator Vic Fangio taking over a unit that had its two worst seasons in franchise history, and taking it from 30th overall in 2013 and 2014, to 14th in 2015.  And he didn’t have close to the pieces he needed.  So many square pegs for round holes.  Now, add Danny Trevathan and Jerrell Freeman as an inside linebacker tandem that can’t be surpassed elsewhere around the league.  Throw in an end who can anchor one side of the line in Akiem Hicks to pair with an ascending young nose tackle in Eddie Goldman.  Pernell McPhee’s knee needs to be ready, with Willie Young and Lamarr Houston rotating in.  With health, that’s a front seven to be excited about for the first time, post-Lovie.  Now, the secondary is another issue, needing Tracy Porter to stay healthy, Kyle Fuller to put it all together and Adrian Amos and a safety-to-be-determined required to make more plays on the ball.  Between the improved first two lines of defense and Year Two of defensive back tutorship under Ed Donatell, I’m sayin’ there’s a chance.

Four-win First

The Houston Texans are a better team than the Bears right now, and should be a better team this season.  But if they open the season without J.J. Watt (back surgery), Brock Osweiler feels the weight of $72 million ($37 million guaranteed) with a green receiving corps outside of DeAndre Hopkins, and the new-look Bears defense can create some chaos and uncertainty for the hosts, it’s not out of the realm of possibility the Bears could steal that opener, depending on their health going in.  So after that?  It’s Philadelphia at home, what should be a dreadful Cowboys defense in Dallas, then Detroit at Soldier Field.  Of course, this franchise has to figure out a way to beat the Lions, which they haven’t done since 2012.  The biggest test to a four-win first month would seem to be the first one.  They pull that off, maybe that baby bear baseball team won’t steal all the attention come October.  If they get there.

In closing, I have not been sipping the Bears Kool-Aid that on-air partner Dan Jiggetts loves to swig.  But who knows?  Maybe I needed to shampoo with some of that sunscreen, after all.

Bears approaching 2016 with change in attitude

Bears approaching 2016 with change in attitude

BOURBONNAIS, Ill. – When John Fox succeeded Marc Trestman as Bears coach early last year, at the top of his to-do list was changing what was a palpable losing culture that had come to hang over the organization and Halas Hall. That involved changes of personnel, practices and even to the point of placing an emphasis on winning preseason games, not simply treating them as evaluation exercises.

This year, attitude adjustment is the least of his concerns. Besides the improvements even amid a season that ended 6-10 but was within a pair of missed field goals of going past .500, the additions of critical players have brought with them exactly what Fox wants, beginning with inside linebacker Danny Trevathan, bringing a Super Bowl ring from the Denver Broncos.

“I’ve experienced a lot of new attitudes here the past few years,” said guard Kyle Long. “This is above and beyond my favorite attitude that we’ve adopted.

“People throw the word ‘culture’ around, [but] it’s just taking pride in what you’re doing. You don’t get paid to play. You get paid to win. I’ve heard John Fox say that a million times and I’m sure I’ll hear him say it 2 million times this year.”

Culture means nothing unless it translates into wins because of a collective mindset. Trevathan, linebacker Jerrell Freeman, defensive lineman Akiem Hicks, offensive linemen Ted Larsen and Bobbie Massie – all came from going to the playoffs at least twice in the past four years, Freeman and Trevathan three times.

The change was particularly evident during offseason sessions when members of the defense worked at a practice level that initially irritated some on offense, with coaches even joining in the chirping.

“I’m all about attitude and hustle and just playing ball,” said Trevathan. “I don’t care what happened before. You can always make up for it, just go 100 miles per hour and have fun.

“This game is short. Your attitude carries over to the team. There’s a lot of time when a team’s down you put your head down. I hate that. Even if we’re down we’re going to fight until the end. That’s what it’s all about, having that band of brothers and that attitude and going to, I won’t say ‘war,’ but going out there and battling together.”

[SHOP: Gear up for the 2016 season, Bears fans!

One word that surfaced from multiple players during offseason sessions was “hungry.” That was not something that was heard even as recent as last season despite the change in coaches. Without that as a starting attitude, mediocrity was not surprising in recent seasons.

“I think with this group the thing that kind of stands out is just how good a group a group of guys it is, and how important football is to them,” said quarterback Jay Cutler.

“I think you look at OTAs and you look at minicamp and you saw how competitive offense and defense and even special teams were. There weren’t any days where guys were laying off of it. Every single day, guys were getting after it trying to get better, and the competition level I felt was extremely high for being in OTAs and minicamp. Whether that’s gonna translate to wins, I guess we’ll have to wait and see.”