'Ridiculous' search? Maybe. Maybe not.

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'Ridiculous' search? Maybe. Maybe not.

The Bears coach search has now gone to at least 13 names, which is by any standard a lot. But maybe not by all that much.

The search firm entrusted with developing GM candidates in 2001 (culminating with the Jerry Angelo hiring) came up with a portfolio of 10, which Ted Phillips trimmed to three finalists.

After the Bears fired Dave Wannstedt in 1998, Mark Hatley was ordered by Michael McCaskey to begin a search for candidates. Hatley went on the road, talked to more than a dozen (including Bill Belichick, Brian Billick and Jim Haslett hows that for a list of ones that got away?), and eventually developed five candidates to bring to Halas Hall for final interviews: Gunther Cunningham, Dick Jauron, Sherm Lewis, Dave McGinnis and Joe Pendry.

The current search process is directed toward developing 2-3 finalists.

An old friend from my long-ago days in corporate work, a senior executive with vast experience in matters of hiring and interviewing, shared some observations on the Bears process so far looking for a new head coach.

Bottom line, he said, whether the Bears have someone in mind or not, 13 candidates is ridiculous! My former company clients, when retaining a search firm to look for a new executive, would usually look at anywhere between three and six candidates before they found the best candidate; on rare occasion the company would request to see additional candidates.

I also think the new GM doesnt want to make a major size mistake; isnt this his first major hire since he took over running the Bears?

This definitely is Emerys first major hire. He did hire some personnel staff but the most-major moves there were promotions of Chris Ballard and Marty Barrett from area scouts to directors of pro and college scouting, respectively.

This is from outside the organization. And as too many organizations can attest, a wrong hire is worse than a slow hire.

Report: CB K'Waun Williams fails physical with Bears

Report: CB K'Waun Williams fails physical with Bears

The Bears search for cornerback depth will continue.

K'Waun Williams, who the Bears were awarded off waivers from the Cleveland Browns on Tuesday, failed his physical and will now become a free agent, according to the Chicago Tribune.

The 25-year-old Williams was suspended by the Browns for two weeks after he refused to play due to an injury in the team's preseason opener against the Green Bay Packers. Following the team-issued two-week suspension, the Browns waived Williams.

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Williams, who signed with the Browns as undrafted free agent out of Pittsburgh in 2014, served as the Browns starting nickel cornerback over the past two seasons. In 26 career games, Williams amassed 60 tackles, two sacks, three forced fumbles and two passes defended.

The Bears will have to look elsewhere for cornerback depth as starters' Tracy Porter (concussion), Kyle Fuller (knee) and nickel corner Bryce Callahan (hamstring) are currently sidelined.

The Bears roster now stands at 74.

Bears claim Browns castoff defensive back K’Waun Williams

Bears claim Browns castoff defensive back K’Waun Williams

This could be interesting.

Bears coach John Fox made a passing reference to “owies” last week, an apparent reference to the typical nicks and bruises that players suffer, presumably falling on the safe side of the pain-vs.-injury line. Coaches like players to play when they can.

The Cleveland Browns suspended K’Waun Williams this offseason for two weeks after the former No. 1 Cleveland nickel cornerback refused to play in the Aug. 12 Browns preseason opener against the Green Bay Packers.

Now the Bears have claimed Williams, 25, waiving cornerback Kevin Peterson, and hope Williams is past what the Browns look to have deemed just their version of an “owie.”

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Williams’ release comes after a convoluted disagreement between player and team, with Williams obtaining medical opinions that he needed surgery to remove bone spurs from an ankle. The team said that Williams never informed them of his ankle problems until the day after the Green Bay game.

The Bears have struggled mightily this preseason to find anything close to a healthy cornerback. Starters Kyle Fuller (knee) and Tracy Porter (concussion) are currently sidelined along with nickel corner Bryce Callahan (hamstring). Jacoby Glenn started for Fuller at New England but also left with a concussion.

Bears O-line will benefit from ripple effect whenever Kyle Long returns

Bears O-line will benefit from ripple effect whenever Kyle Long returns

Pro Bowl right guard Kyle Long continued doing work on the side of Bears practice on Tuesday. He won’t play Thursday at Cleveland, but he represents a looming one-man shakeup of the offensive line — in a positive way — when he returns from a shoulder injury, presumably next week.

Coach John Fox demurred from saying that Long will be in the lineup when the Bears open the regular season Sept. 11 in Houston.

“We’re anticipating him at least being back out there to get ready for Houston,” was as far as Fox would go on Tuesday.

But Ted Larsen, who has filled in for Long at right guard while Cornelius Edison worked as the No. 1 center, has been taking some snaps at center, a hint that Long might be on course for a return for Houston.

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When that happens, it will effectively improve all three interior-line positions at the same time.

The upgrade at right guard is immediate and obvious. When Long was pressed into an emergency shift to right tackle the week before the opener vs. Green Bay last year, it sent Vlad Ducasse into the starting lineup at Long’s preferred spot. Long now represents an obvious upgrade over Larsen.

Installing Larsen at center, where he went after Hroniss Grasu suffered his season-ending knee injury, upgrades the center position over Edison, who has never played an NFL game.

The third upgrade happens at left guard, where rookie Cody Whitehair has settled in at the job he stepped into when Larsen was out late in the offseason. Whitehair is a rookie; Larsen, who has played center during his career, is better able to help Whitehair than Edison, certainly at this point in the latter’s career.