Super Bowl Chicago contd. What will the President say?


Super Bowl Chicago contd. What will the President say?

The seating capacity of Soldier Field is one thing working strongly against Chicago hosting a Super Bowl. The stadium lost 5,000 seats in the remodeling, which had the feel of a white flag on a Super Bowl at the time, apart from any feelings about the overall revised Soldier Field.

The stadium has increased the seating to about 63,500 since then. But the capacity on the field is a bigger problem.

The Soldier Field turf is a tiresome, repeating annual story. Its 2011 iteration began during training camp last year with the canceled Friday night practice for fans to watch.

The Super Bowl is the NFLs showcase; the Soldier Field turf is an embarrassment to the city. Those are hard to reconcile.

What it suggests indirectly is leverage for the Bears, or rather for the Park District. If Mayor Rahm Emanuel wants the game, the league can be expected to demand a world-class playing surface.

True Chicago politicking would have the situation being a way for the City to kick in for field turf. The Mayor can use the rationale of money brought into the local economy by a Super Bowl would more than offset the Citys share of paying for a pro teams playing surface.

In any case, the overall is a win-win for Emanuel.

If Chicago gets the game, its a catch that would have made Hizzoner proud.

If Chicago doesnt, Emanuel will always be the guy who made the pitch and garnered some attention for the City even with the request itself.

Dont look for Barack Obama to weigh in too heavily with the NFL, even with his Chicago connection.

For one thing, he may not be President by the time the next available game is played (2016). He may not be President when the 2016 game is even assigned by the NFL.

If Obama takes one citys side over, say, Cleveland, Buffalo or Pittsburgh, he may irritate some votes in those towns at a time when Mitt Romney is in a position to make him pay for lost support.

Best guess: POTUS will express his liking the idea of a Super Bowl in Chicago but Commissioner Roger Goodells NFL phone wont be ringing with a push from 1600 Pennsylvania Ave.

Three keys and prediction: Notre Dame - Miami

Three keys and prediction: Notre Dame - Miami

1. Get DeShone Kizer back on track. Notre Dame can’t afford a third consecutive sub-optimal game from its star quarterback, who followed his understandingly-ineffective game in Hurricane Matthew at N.C. State with a head-scratching benching in ideal conditions against Stanford. Miami has a good passing defense (13th in S&P+) that will provide a stiff test. The hope here is that Kizer returns from the bye week feeling refreshed, and that translates into the kind of showings he had in Weeks 1-5. But without a successful game from Kizer, Notre Dame will have an awfully difficult time beating Miami. 

2. Pressure Brad Kaaya. While all quarterbacks are, of course, far less effective under pressure, Kaaya’s splits are significant: A 67.5 completion percentage with no pressure and a 32.4 completion percentage under pressure. Miami ranks a mediocre 63d in adjusted sack rate, though Notre Dame’s defense ranks 119th at getting to the quarterback by the same measure. Notre Dame did have some success pressuring Stanford’s quarterbacks two weeks ago, but that was against a surprisingly weak Cardinal offensive line. If Notre Dame can’t make Kaaya uncomfortable on Saturday, he should have no problem picking apart the Irish secondary. 

3. Finally come up with “a play.” Notre Dame’s five losses have all been by eight or fewer points, and in each of them, the Irish have had a chance to win or tie late. Coach Brian Kelly feels like his team is only a play or two short of having beaten Texas, Michigan State, Duke, N.C. State and Stanford a year after making them against lesser opponents like Virginia and Temple. The onus is on Kelly and his coaching staff to get this still young team in better positions to make and execute those critical plays that could start flipping losses to wins. 

Prediction: Miami 27, Notre Dame 23. DeShone Kizer plays better but struggles to finish drives while Miami’s offense rides a second half surge to a comeback win to deal the Irish their sixth loss of the season. 

What life was like the last time the Cubs hosted a World Series game at Wrigley Field

What life was like the last time the Cubs hosted a World Series game at Wrigley Field

25,950 days ago.

That's how long it's been since Wrigley Field last saw a World Series game played in front of the ivy.

Sure, 71 years is a long time, but when you break it down by days, it seems even more daunting.

For starters, take a glance at a snapshot of what Wrigley - and the world - looked like on the day of the last World Series game on Chicago's North side:

#FlashbackFriday: 71 years ago, the last time Wrigley Field hosted a #WorldSeries game.

A photo posted by MLB ⚾ (@mlb) on

Obviously, that was well before Wrigley got lights (1988).

[SHOP: Buy a "Try Not to Suck" shirt with proceeds benefiting Joe Maddon's Respect 90 Foundation & other Cubs Charities]

Here's some more perspective on how stunningly different life was back in 1945:

—The average cost of a new house was $4,600.

—The average salary was $2,400 per year per person.

—Gas cost 15 cents a gallon.

—New cars were just over $1,000.

—Life expectancy was 65.9 years (life expectancy in America is 79.3 years in 2016).

—Population of the U.S. was just shy of 140 million (In 2016, America's population is more than 324 million).

—Major League Baseball had only 16 teams, including zero teams west of St. Louis.

—The Giants had yet to move to San Francisco and were still in New York. The Dodgers had yet to move to Los Angeles and still made their home in Brooklyn.

—Washington had a baseball team, but they were called the Senators, not the Nationals.

—St. Louis, Boston and Philadelphia each had two baseball teams, including the St. Louis Browns, Boston Braves and Philadelphia Athletics.

—Tigers pitcher Hal Newhouser won American League MVP honors while Cubs first baseman Phil Cavarretta took home the NL MVP with only six homers, though he did hit .355 with a .949 OPS.

—The first Super Bowl was still 22 years away from being played.

Among world events, 1945 was also when Adolf Hitler died, Germany surrendered in World War II and the U.S. dropped atomic bombs on Japan.

America was also getting used to Harry S. Truman as president after Franklin D. Roosevelt died in office in April 1945.

Of course, if we go as far back as the last time the Cubs won the World Series, life would be quite a bit different even in the 37 years between 1908 and 1945.