Trestman should be a serious candidate for Bears

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Trestman should be a serious candidate for Bears

The coaching career of Marc Trestman deserves a look from Phil Emery because its littered with success. Born just north in the land of 10,000 lakes, Trestman has served as head coach of the CFLs Montreal Alouettes the last five seasons while taking part in the cottage industry of preparing quarterbacks for the NFL Draft.

He taps into his great understanding of the position as Trestman played quarterback for the University of Minnesota Gophers before transferring his senior year to Minnesota State University Moorhead.

MOON: Thoughts on Dennison, Trestman and why no Lovie?

Timing more than anything else, has been Trestmans biggest nemesis in the NFL, not his ability to coach. Everywhere Trestman has been hired to correct offensive issues, the head coach was fired. Through his travels, Trestman has tutored some of the NFLs greatest quarterbacks like Bernie Kozar, Steve Young and Rich Gannon.

Trestman even brought productivity to average quarterbacks like the Lions' Scott Mitchell who threw for 3,500 yards under Trestmans guidance or rookie quarterbacks like Arizona Cardinals' Jake Plummer, who burst onto the scene under Trestman.

For good measure, Treastman was so fed up with the NFL he went to Canada to finally call his own shots as head coach of the Montreal Allouettes, who have three Grey Cup Championship appearances in Treastmans five seasons.

Treastmans Allouettes have won two of those three Grey Cup Championships plus his quarterback Anthony Calvillo won back to back CFL MVP awards during the process.

Many who do not know, will downplay the CFL claiming it is not NFL caliber. Its simply not true because at the end of the day, its still football. Six-time NFL Executive of the Year Bill Polian spent time in the CFL winning Grey Cups also.

If anything, it improves Trestmans resume, as he is a championship head coach who can build a team while being heavily involved in the decision making process of a winning organization. Furthermore, for Trestman to adapt to the CFL style of play under a different set of rules is impressive.

These are all strengths for Trestman, not weaknesses. Plus two of Trestmans pre-draft protoges were on the Bears' roster at the end of the season. Both Jay Cutler and Jason Campbell utilized Trestman during pre-draft workouts before both were selected in the first round of the annual NFL Draft.

Lastly, I talked with one of Trestmans former quarterbacks, Gannon, who spent two stints with Trestman during his NFL career. One stop was in Minnesota, where Gannon spent two years with Trestman stating, "It was young in Trestmans career where he did not have the ability to be more hands on. He couldnt call the shots."

The other stop was in Oakland, where Gannon went on to win the NFL MVP award while the Raiders marched to a Super Bowl appearance against the Tampa Bay Buccaneers. Trestman was seasoned at this point in his coaching career from all of his prior coaching stops. Gannons analysis of Treastman was glowing when he said, He was smart, innovative, quarterback friendly and pass protection-conscious.

In summation, Treastman is a serious contender to be the Bears' next head coach. Gannons last statement alone will perk up many Bears fans, when pass protection is mentioned as a priority.

Treastman is an quality coach who should be coaching in the NFL, but as many know, timing is everything and it has not been in Treastmans favor. He has worked well with every quarterback hes coached and productivity has followed.

Lastly, Treastman may even be able to work his own contract as hes been a member of the Florida Bar since 1983 when he graduated from the Miami School of Law while coaching Bernie Kozar and the Hurricanes to the National Championship.

Bears numbers don't indicate 3-13, yet still lie

Bears numbers don't indicate 3-13, yet still lie

In doing some post-season wrapping up of my Nerdy NFL Notebook as we begin turning the page to the 2017 season, part of it involves compiling where each team finished in big-picture team offensive and defensive categories: overall ranking (total yards), as well as team rushing and passing ranks on both sides of the ball.

So if the Bears wound up ranked 15th overall in total yards gained and allowed, they should've finished…oh, 8-8, right? It adds to the deception of some of the deeper issues that focus on a lack of playmakers, which tied into their inability to make plays when it matters most. In John Fox's 9-23 start, 18 of those games have been decided by six points or less. They've won just six of those games. 

Offensively, the Bears ranked higher in total offense than five playoff teams: Kansas City (20), Detroit (21), Miami (24), New York Giants (25) and Houston (29). They wound up 17th in rushing offense, better than four teams who advanced: Seattle (25), Green Bay (26), New York Giants (29) and Detroit (30). And their 14th-ranked passing offense ranked better than the Giants (17), Kansas City (19), Dallas (23), Miami (26), Houston (29).

On the other side of the ball, they'd be even better off before allowing 109 points over the final three losses. Their total defense ranked better than Detroit (18), Green Bay (22), Kansas City (24), Atlanta (25), Oakland (26) and Miami (29). After being gashed for 558 rushing yards the last three games, they fell to 27th in the NFL against the run (better than only 30th-ranked Miami). But the seventh-ranked pass defense, despite collecting a measly eight interceptions (among only 11 turnovers), was better than nine playoff teams: Miami (15), Pittsburgh (16), Kansas City (18), Detroit (19), the Giants (23), Oakland (24), Dallas (26), Atlanta (28) and Green Bay (31).

[SHOP: Gear up Bears fans!]

What do all the hollow numbers indicate? A lack of complementary, opportunistic football, playmakers on both sides of the ball, a minus-20 turnover ratio, and a lack of quality and continuity at the quarterback position — to name a few. All of those playoff teams have more impact players (or kept more of their impact players healthy) than the Bears in 2016.

While some of the numbers aren't that bad to look at, and some even raise an eyebrow, there's still a deep climb from the most significant numbers: 3-13.

Bears' best rookies will have another learning curve

Bears' best rookies will have another learning curve

There's a sense of irony and, to a certain degree, concern about what changes the Bears' coaching staff has undergone.

Think of the best of Ryan Pace's 2016 rookie class: Leonard Floyd, Cody Whitehair, and Jordan Howard. They were brought along under the position group tutelage of outside linebackers coach Clint Hurtt, offensive line coach Dave Magazu and running backs coach Stan Drayton. The latter was the first to depart, shortly after the season ended, to return to the collegiate ranks on Texas' new staff.

He's been replaced with former 49ers and Bills offensive coordinator Curtis Modkins (also serving as that position coach in Detroit, Buffalo, Arizona and Kansas City). Howard certainly adapted to the NFL game well, more than anyone expected, as the NFL's second-leading rusher. One would think Drayton played a part in that.

Longtime John Fox assistant Magazu was also let go after the season despite the impressive move of second-round pick Whitehair to center the week of the season opener after Josh Sitton was signed following his release by Green Bay. Whitehair was sold as a "quick study" following his selection out of Kansas State, where he was a four-year starter at three different positions (but not center).

[SHOP: Gear up Bears fans!]

Like Howard, he wound up making the All-Rookie team, but whether he remains in the middle of the line or not, he'll be getting his orders now from Jeremiah Washburn.

Rounding out the trio of All-Rookie selections was Floyd, who was brought along by Hurtt. He impressed Fox enough to be kept around from Marc Trestman's staff, and moved from defensive line to outside linebackers.

That's where he assisted Willie Young in morphing to a foreign role, yet still managing 14 sacks over the last two seasons. The Bears have yet to name a replacement for Hurtt, who's joined the Seahawks in taking over one of their strengths in recent years, the defensive line.

These three were already good, and the jewels of last year's draft. But if they're to grow and ascend into impact contributors if and when this team becomes a regular playoff contender, it'll come from new faces, new voices in their respective classrooms and position groups.