Trestman stays in NFL with Tucker as D-coordinator

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Trestman stays in NFL with Tucker as D-coordinator

The third piece of coach Marc Trestmans senior team clicked into place late Friday when former Jacksonville Jaguars defensive coordinator Mel Tucker was selected as defensive coordinator.

The step leaves out current defensive backs coach Jon Hoke and two college candidates as Trestman continues to lean on the NFL for his top staff additions.

Tucker joins offensive coordinator Aaron Kromer from New Orleans and special teams coordinator Joe DeCamillis from Dallas as the heads of the three phases of Bears on-field ops.

The Tucker hiring was part of a handful of hirings Friday. Dallas running backs coach Skip Peete was signed to replace Tim Jennings as Bears running backs coach.

Andy Bischoff, from Trestmans staff with the Montreal Alouettes, was hired as Bears tight ends coach. Michael Sinclair, defensive line coach with the Alouettes, joins Trestmans staff as assistant defensive line coach.

The Tucker move raised some eyebrows around the NFL because of the abysmal 2012 season that the Jacksonville defense suffered through. The Bears ran up 41 points on the Jaguars in their Oct. 7 game in Jacksonville with a season-high 501 yards and three offensive touchdowns. Jacksonville tied for 29th in scoring defense with nearly 28 points per game. The Jaguars were 28th in yardage allowed and 27th in scoring defense in 2010.

Before his stint in Jacksonville, Tucker was defensive backs coach for the Cleveland Browns from 2005-07 before being promoted to defensive coordinator in 2008 after the firing of Todd Grantham. When the Browns went 4-12, Tucker was let go along with the rest of coach Romeo Crennels staff.

Tucker was co-defensive coordinator at Ohio State in 2004 and was defensive backs coach when the Buckeyes won the national championship in 2002. Before Ohio State he was a member of Nick Sabans staffs at LSU and Michigan State.

Bears, Lions have been totally different teams in fourth quarters

Bears, Lions have been totally different teams in fourth quarters

Apart from any specific player or statistic, one unavoidable part of Sunday’s game against the Detroit Lions looms ominously in front of the Bears, and there is no way they can avoid it: The fourth quarter.

Every game has one, and it has been the blessing of the Lions’ 2016 existence and the bane of the Bears’. The Bears talk constantly about the importance of playing a 60-minute game.

Before last Sunday’s 28-13 win over the New Orleans Saints, the Lions had trailed in the fourth quarter of all seven of their previous victories this season. A team that had traditionally found undisciplined ways to squander games has been finding ways to win them, according to a formula.

As Detroit Free Press columnist Jeff Seidel noted, “every single one of these games has looked the same: There was the drive, the field goal and the huge defensive play or, at least, some variation of those things."

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This is particularly relevant — and concerning — for the Bears, who have been the virtual opposite: Three times this season (at Houston, at Indianapolis, vs. Jacksonville) they have led in fourth quarters and lost those games.

The reasons lie in different phases, not simply cases of one, same unit failing.

"With us it’s not excuses, but we’re young, on our third quarterback, and that can affect it as far as experience and just being in that situation,” said coach John Fox. “To close the game, sometimes it’s just a mindset. When you have young players, it’s learning how to deal with adversity and learning how to deal with prosperity.”

The Bears did not outscore an opponent in the fourth quarter of any of their first 10 games this season, finally getting something going late in the Tennessee and San Francisco games, outscoring those two opponents by a combined 19-3.

“Being able to finish games, that’s something we’re learning and I think I saw examples of it last week in the San Francisco game and even going back to Minnesota, games where we have closed it, even in the first Detroit game, although we made that one interesting,” Fox said. “We found a way. So a lot of it’s experience under pressure and hopefully we’re figuring it out and can figure it out the last four games of the year.”

Beginning Sunday, presumably, against the NFL’s reigning comeback team.

Brandon Marshall doesn't remember 3 TD game from Bears-49ers in 2014 because he was on pain pills

Brandon Marshall doesn't remember 3 TD game from Bears-49ers in 2014 because he was on pain pills

Remember back in 2014 when the Bears rallied from a 14-point deficit in the fourth quarter to beat the 49ers 28-20 in San Francisco on Sunday Night Football?

Well, Brandon Marshall doesn't.

And he had three of the four touchdown catches, two of them coming in the last quarter.

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The former Bears wide receiver, who had been dealing with a high ankle sprain, said he took pain pills before the game and doesn't recall much of it, including the incredible one-handed grab that went viral.

"I don't really remember much about that game because I worked really hard to get back from a high ankle (sprain)," Marshall said during a conference call Wednesday. "I'll say it, I took a couple pain pills that masked the pain. I really wasn't supposed to play. I came back from a high ankle (sprain) within 10 days. I was supposed to be out four to six weeks. I don't remember much from that game. I just remember catching those balls. And that was pretty much it."

If only Bears fans could forget that season entirely, which ended in a 5-11 record and the end of the Marc Trestman era.