Veteran accountability in Minny


Veteran accountability in Minny

The Bears-Vikings game Sunday may mean nothing more on an NFL level than draft positioning but it will in fact mean quite a bit more within the organization.

Where rookies are the ones primarily under scrutiny in meaningless final preseason games, veterans are also on watch lists now, according to general manager Jerry Angelo.

Im looking at veteran players. Everyone is held accountable, Angelo told team website on Wednesday. So its not just about a young players development. Its also about veteran players continuing to play to their abilities. Everyone is accountable for their performance.

The Bears are expected to be aggressive again this offseason, looking at wide receivers, cornerbacks, defensive linemen and offensive linemen in particular. This places a number of vets under particular scrutiny next Sunday.

Neither Zackary Bowman nor Tim Jennings has solved a major concern at cornerback. Nose tackle Anthony Adams is signed through 2012 but has been relegated to the bench and is a longshot to return, particularly with the emerging play and versatility of rookie Stephen Paea.

Israel Idonije is only signed through the end of this season, wants to play in Chicago but has not come close to his impact eight-sack season of 2010. His place and that of Corey Wootton, hampered by nagging injuries through his two seasons, are in some jeopardy if the Bears can land a pass rusher to station opposite Julius Peppers.

Angelo was pleased with the play of Josh McCown against the Green Bay Packers and McCown can play his way at least into training camp with another solid performance. But Angelo is not handing out backup jobs at quarterback, either.

One thing you dont do when players have good games or poor games, you dont run with things, Angelo said. Well have time to make that decision.

Bears Talk Podcast: What's next for Bears at QB after Brian Hoyer suffers broken arm?


Bears Talk Podcast: What's next for Bears at QB after Brian Hoyer suffers broken arm?

Lance Briggs, Alex Brown and Jim Miller break down where the Bears go at QB following Brian Hoyer’s injury and evaluate the defense’s gutsy performance on Thursday night against the Packers despite numerous injuries. Plus, a look at the big picture and who can help the Bears down the road.

Check out the latest edition of the Bears Talk Podcast here:

Bears Grades: Quarterback woes take offense to new low in loss to Packers

Bears Grades: Quarterback woes take offense to new low in loss to Packers

GREEN BAY, Wisc. – The Bears could scarcely have started off any worse Thursday night against the Green Bay Packers, with exactly one positive play in the entire first quarter.

And then things got bad.

Quarterback Brian Hoyer, having his worst outing since succeeding Jay Cutler, sustained a broken left forearm when he was hit by Clay Matthews and Julius Peppers after releasing a second-quarter pass. Matt Barkley replaced Hoyer, but the focus now centers on Jay Cutler returning from a thumb injury suffered in game two vs. Philadelphia, and Cutler starting a week from Monday in Soldier Field against the currently undefeated Minnesota Vikings.

“When [Cutler’s return] is going to be,” said coach John Fox, “I can’t say.”

Regardless of the quarterback, the offense showed none of the efficiency exhibited in the last four games under Hoyer. The Packers were good enough to encroach before the first snap; after the gratis five yards, the Bears netted exactly zero on three snaps before punting. The Bears failed to gain a yard on eight of their first nine plays

By the end of the first half the Bears were without both starting guards and their starting quarterback, with left guard Josh Sitton inactive due to an ankle injury and Kyle Long sidelined in the second quarter.

[SHOP: Gear up Bears fans!]

The offensive finished with 189 total yards, the lowest Bears total since game three of the 2015 season, in Seattle against the Seahawks (146).

“It was just a weird night,” said tight end Zach Miller.

Quarterback: F-    

Brian Hoyer was uncharacteristically inaccurate in the first half, missing on five of his first six passes and finished with 4-for-11 passing for 49 yards and a 50.9 rating. Worst of all, he overthrew a wide open Josh Bellamy on a seam route in the second quarter with Bellamy well behind the defense.

Matt Barkley, who last threw passes (three, all incomplete) for the Philadelphia Eagles in November 2014, fared poorly, not unexpectedly. Barkley completed six of 15 throws, was sacked once and threw two interceptions.

“I don’t know what’s going to happen the next couple weeks,” said Barkley, alluding to the uncertain status of Cutler. “I know I can do the job. ... I know I’m better than that.”

Running back: D+

With Hoyer gone, the Packers clamped down on the Bears’ rushing plans. But Ka’Deem Carey did an excellent job of gaining yards after contact, both on rushes and pass receptions. Carey finished with 48 rushing yards on 10 carries and caught his only pass target for nine.

Jordan Howard was completely shut down in the first quarter but recovered somewhat with an 11-yard carry and another for nine.

Receivers: B-

Quarterback issues and glaring inaccuracies rendered receivers as largely non-factors. Josh Bellamy gave the Bears their only positive play in the first quarter, with a 25-yard catch for a third-down conversion.

But while Alshon Jeffery was targeted 11 times, he finished with only three receptions. Zach Miller caught two of five. “You have to dial it back a little bit,” Miller said, “but we tried to stick to the game plan.”

Offensive line: D

The line was without Josh Sitton (inactive because of an ankle injury). Eric Kush started at left guard, his second NFL start since coming into the league in 2013.

Protection was about as good as could be expected overall, with Barkley taking one sack and Hoyer taking the huge hit on which he suffered his broken arm. But the Packers managed just five total hits on Bears quarterbacks and the run game averaged 3.8 yards per carry.

Coaching: C

What coaches could have done differently with the personnel available is difficult to analyze. Eventually the defense caved in because of the offense being unable to generate any continuity.