Blackhawks breakdown: Daniel Carcillo


Blackhawks breakdown: Daniel Carcillo Blackhawks Insider Tracey Myers and PGL host Chris Boden will evaluate the 2011-12 performance of each player on the Hawks roster. One breakdown will occur every weekday in numerical order.
In one hit on Edmonton Oilers defenseman Tom Gilbert on Jan. 2, Daniel Carcillo received a five-minute major penalty, seven-game suspension and torn ACL that ended his first season in Chicago after just 28 games. While he was on the ice (for an average of 11 minutes, 24 second per game), Carcillo scored two goals and had nine assists. He delivered 76 hits, sat i the penalty box for 82 minutes and fininshed plus-10.

Boden's take: Like Steve Montador, Carcillo's season can't truly be assessed outside of the 28 games he played. He started the season serving a suspension carried over from the 2011 Stanley Cup playoffs, and earned two more sitdowns, including the play that eventually ended his season. As he shuffled between forward lines, he seemed at times to be trying to figure out the fine line between hard, clean play and a style that crept over "the edge." Sometimes it even seemed as though he was thinking whether to be more agitator or playmaker. When he found a comfort zone on the correct side of that line, he was good. Had he stayed healthy, he could have been useful in the playoff series against Phoenix. He's willing to dig in corners and protect the skill guys if he's on the top two lines.

Myers' take: Ah, Carbomb. When he was good, he was pretty good. And when he was bad he was suspended. Carcillo started the season where few expected him to: on a line with Marian Hossa and Patrick Kane. And for the most part, the experiment was a good one. Carcillo provided the protection for the Blackhawks stars and added a little offense of his own. But then there was that other side, the one that has led to 10 suspensions and fines, including three this season. Carcillos last was his most costly, both for the Blackhawks and him personally (seven games and a season-ending knee surgery).

2012-13 Expectations

Chris: Despite being sidelined with his major knee injury, the Blackhawks re-signed him to a two-year, 1.65 million deal, saying if they didn't, they'd be looking for a similar type of player on the market, anyway. He wasn't expected to begin skating for another couple of weeks after his January surgery. The play on which he was injured is a classic example of the quick decisions a player like him must make. He could have won the race to the puck behind the Oilers' net, but in my opinion, chose to slow down to make the physical (and illegal) play on Gilbert.

We know what he's capable of doing from a hell-raising standpoint. If he finds himself too often on the wrong side of discipline, the Blackhawks need to be much better penalty killers than this past season. He doesn't have to do his best Matt Cooke impression and go almost completely choirboy (the Penguin had a career-high 19 goals, but a career-low 44 penalty minutes after 129 and multiple suspensions the year before), but just find a way to play his game, and remain in the lineup.

Tracey: The Blackhawks gave Carcillo a two-year extension because they liked his edge. Now he needs to play on the right side of it a lot more often. His past is what it is, and the suspension lengths will only keep going up if he keeps getting into trouble. Guys like Cooke have shown they can clean up and be a strong -- and still edgy -- contributor to their teams. Carcillo has to do the same.

How do you feel about this evaluation? As always, be sure to chime in with your thoughts by commenting below and check out some of Carcillo's highlights above.

Previously: Duncan Keith, Niklas Hjalmarsson, Steve Montador, Sean O'Donnell, Brent Seabrook, Nick Leddy, Patrick Sharp

Up next: Andrew Brunette

Preview: Blackhawks host Flames Monday on CSN

Preview: Blackhawks host Flames Monday on CSN

The Blackhawks (3-3, 6 points) take on the Calgary Flames (1-4-1, 3 points) on Monday, and you can catch all the action on CSN. Coverage begins with Blackhawks Pregame Live at 7 p.m. Be sure to stick around after the final horn to get analysis and player reaction on Blackhawks Postgame Live.

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Kerry Wood on Cubs World Series berth: 'More emotional than I thought it was gonna be'

Kerry Wood on Cubs World Series berth: 'More emotional than I thought it was gonna be'

Kerry Wood couldn't resist a 5 Outs joke. 

The iconic Cubs pitcher was a huge part of that 2003 team that famously came just five outs from the World Series before a Game 6 meltdown in the National League Championship Series.

As if to toy with history and laugh in its face, Joe Maddon made the five outs drama last even longer Saturday night.

Kyle Hendricks gave up a one-out single in the eighth inning with the Cubs up five and Maddon came out to make a pitching change. 

Of course, it all turned out just fine. The Cubs went on to win and silence any talk of curses or jinxes and made Steve Bartman and that 2003 just another chapter in history.

"I was good once we got past five outs away," Wood joked with reporters outside the champagne-soaked Cubs clubhouse about 90 minutes after the Cubs clinched a trip to the World Series for the first time in 71 years.

"These guys got to experience what we didn't get to experience. We got to play in this game, we just didn't get to celebrate after. Obviously extremely happy for the city. These guys have cemented themselves in history and they're gonna be linked forever.

"It's just great. We got four more to go and it's the right group to go with."

Wood said he "felt" it coming to the game, predicting with his buddies that the Cubs would jump on Clayton Kershaw and score on him early in the game.

The Cubs scored twice in the first, once in the second and then added on with solo tallies in the fourth and fifth innings off Kershaw.

"They don't listen to the history," Wood said. "It doesn't bother them. These guys come out and seem unaffected by the history. So, obviously, we're in a good place we haven't been in a long time. It's a great night.

"It's mind-blowing. Being out there with the crowd, it's such a cool experience."

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Wood pitched 12 seasons for the Cubs, but if you include the year he missed for injury (1999) and the time he's worked for the organization since retirement in 2012, he's spent nearly two decades on the North Side of Chicago.

So when he saw the Cubs record their final out and put history in the rearview mirror, Wood was overcome with emotion.

"Surprisingly a bit more than I was expecting," he said. "Just watching the guys do their thing on the field and celebrate. [MLB chief baseball officer] Joe Torre's talking and tryin to do his thing and the guys just split up and spread out and went and saw the fans - which is exactly what they should've done.

"It's a little more emotional than I thought it was gonna be."

Wood said he really started believing it was all possible when Addison Russell and Anthony Rizzo woke up with the bats in Game 4 in Los Angeles and the Cubs looked like they got their mojo back.

He also marveled at the team's youth and how poised they were throughout the entire season, especially in the face of adversity.

"I don't think [the weight of history affected them]," Wood said. "That's the key. And not saying it affected us. I don't think it affected us either. We'd go out there and play the game.

"S--t, half these guys weren't born when this stuff was going on. It's great. They got a young group and I think Joe leads them in the right direction and doesn't let them get caught up in the off-the-field stuff. It's just a great combination top to bottom."

Wood threw out the first pitch before the historic Game 6 Saturday night, wearing a Ron Santo jersey.

Three hours later, he was still wearing the jersey, even celebrating with fans:

And he plans right on wearing the No. 10 jersey for at least another week.

"Ronnie didn't get to see this," Wood said of Santo, who died in 2010. "He didn't get to witness this night. Definitely going to wear it all the way through. Hopefully that will let him experience it a little bit with me. 

"I expect big things and I'll see you guys in Cleveland."