Blackhawks of the past opening doors for the future

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Blackhawks of the past opening doors for the future

When Cliff Koroll and the late Keith Magnuson decided to form the Blackhawks Alumni Association, it was originally to help assist fellow former players in need.

Then they decided to accept applications and award a college scholarship to a deserving local high school hockey player through the year-round fund-raising done by the BAA. That first scholarship was for 1,500 and went to Tom Dillon.

25 years later, Dillon now organizes the annual luncheon honoring that years recipients, and the Class of 2012 and the All-State team were recognized Monday at the Hyatt Lodge at McDonalds Campus in Oak Brook. Most of the current Blackhawks players were there, many alumni and coach Joel Quenneville as well as the bulk of the front office, including Chairman Rocky Wirtz and President & CEO John McDonough.

We had 71 applications this year, said Koroll, the Associations President. Ten of us went through all the applications. We had a scoring system, and these three kids were way above everybody else.

Congratulations to Laura Brennan, Jacob Wachlin and Stephanie Jackson.

We got another three great kids two females, which shows that women are slowly taking over here, Koroll smiled. I think that gives us eight or nine girls thatve been recipients.

The decision process is based on five categories, with each applicant receiving up to ten points in each category by the ten panelists. Theyre judged based on need, their grades, community involvement, character (through letters of recommendation) and essays they write on what hockey means to them and why they feel theyre deserving. Koroll says four of the top six applicants were females, a statement as to how far girls hockey has come in Illinois.

Im really excited to be part of the organization. When I got the call, I just kept saying thank you over and over again because I didnt know what else to say, said Brennan, who attends Oak Park-River Forest High School but plays defense for Fenwick and has yet to decide where to attend college. (Hockeys) definitely shaped me as a person. Socially, Ive met a lot of friends through hockey, people Ill never forget. But its also helped me become a better thinker. Just playing hockey forces me to make decisions faster and think more critically about things. Its given me opportunities to meet new people, try new things and given me the confidence to do that.

Wachlin was similarly excited upon finding out he got the scholarship.

I was just so pumped (when receiving the phone call), said Wachlin, who is home-schooled in Arlington Heights and plays left wing for PREP (a team formed from students from Palatine, Rolling Meadows, Elk Grove and Prospect). It was just so exciting to get the phone call, I was so pumped after seeing so many Hawks games. Its just cool to get helped out for school by such a cool organization.

Wachlin wants to pursue mechanical engineering at either Michigan Tech or M.I.T., while Jackson, who plays center for the Naper Valley Warriors, plans on attending Illinois and playing for its club team while studying animal sciences for veterinary medicine.

When they called, I didnt get the news. They called my mom, and when she told me, I didnt believe her at first, said Jackson. The next day, I got about 20 emails from people in the (Blackhawks) organization congratulating me.

The Alumni Association has now awarded 82 scholarships, providing more than 1 million worth of education to its recipients.

Resilient Wild make statement with comeback win over Blackhawks

Resilient Wild make statement with comeback win over Blackhawks

The Minnesota Wild have been chasing the Blackhawks for a long time.

They may not be so far away now.

After falling behind 2-0, the Wild scored three unanswered goals to beat the Blackhawks 3-2 at the United Center on Sunday night, and moved into sole possession of first place in the Central Division and Western Conference with 61 points, and still have four games in hand.

But even the Wild had to remind themselves that they're on the same playing surface as the Blackhawks, who eliminated Minnesota from the playoffs for three consecutive seasons from 2013-15, two of which were en route to Stanley Cup wins.

"We were pretty slow," coach Bruce Boudreau said about the team's first period. "I thought we were in a little bit of quick sand. We watched them play. I think it was a little bit more [we were] in awe. It's the Chicago Blackhawks, we're supposed to be in awe."

When they snapped out of it, the Wild looked like the team that has become one of the NHL's best, having now won 17 of their last 19 games.

Wild nemesis Patrick Kane scored the game's first two goals, but Minnesota displayed the type of resiliency every contender needs by evening it up in the second period thanks to a power-play goal by Nino Neiderreiter — his third goal in as many games — and Chris Stewart, who found the back of the net for the second consecutive contest.

Jason Pominville, who hadn't scored in 19 straight games, registered the game-winner early in the third period to cap off a Wild victory. It's Minnesota's eighth straight win against Chicago, a feat that even its coach can't explain.

"To beat this team eight times in a row is really something," Boudreau said. "I don't understand how you could do it. I wish I would have had that knowledge a couple years ago. But it's a new year and it's just one in a row right now."

That's one of many reasons why the Wild have been so successful this season. They're taking it one game at a time, and no matter what the score is, they continue to play the same way and have the belief they can win any game.

Less than 24 hours before their win over the Blackhawks, the Wild jumped out to a 4-0 lead in Dallas and squandered it in the third period. They found a way to bounce back, however, to take home a 5-4 victory in regulation.

So, how do they keep doing it?

"I don't know," Boudreau responded. "We're supposed to. If you want to win, you've got to come back, right? You got to believe. I think the biggest thing is believing you can, and that's the first step. If you don't believe you can come back, you never come back. If you always believe there's a chance, there's a good chance you can do it."

Said Stewart: "I just think we're a confident bunch. We believe in ourselves. We know we didn't get the start that we wanted, but we got one to crawl back in it and all this team needs is a little bit of life."

There's no better measuring stick than to beat a team in your division that's won three championships since 2010, and has been powerhouses in the West for nearly a decade.

And it's something the Wild hope — and believe — they're in the process of achieving.

"It's always a big rival," Neiderreiter said. "You always want to beat the Hawks. They won a few Stanley Cup in the past few years, and that's something we want to accomplish someday. To do that, we have to make sure we beat top teams like that."

Five Things from Blackhawks-Wild: Start strong, finish fizzles

Five Things from Blackhawks-Wild: Start strong, finish fizzles

Well, that weekend didn't go as planned.

The Blackhawks played a lot better on Sunday night but suffered the same fate as Friday, coming away with no points and losing first place in the Western Conference in their 3-2 loss to the Minnesota Wild.

Let's dispense with the frivolities. Here are Five Things to take away from the Blackhawks' loss to Minnesota.

1. Strong start. The Blackhawks needed to come out strong in this one, mainly because their Friday game against the Washington Capitals was so bad but also because the Wild were coming off a frenzied 5-4 victory over the Dallas Stars on Saturday night. The Blackhawks got the appropriate start, outshooting the Wild 14-8 and leading 1-0 on Patrick Kane's goal. Speaking of which… 

2. Kane with the great evening. The Blackhawks dressing seven defensemen meant one thing: Kane was probably going to get a lot of ice time. That he did, double-shifting with the second and fourth lines in the first period and giving the Blackhawks a 2-0 lead with first- and second-period goals. Kane finished with a career-high 12 shots on goal in 27:09 of ice time. "You know you're going to play a lot. I don't know if [27] minutes is that amount you want to be playing, but at the same time, you're not going to say no when he calls you to go out there too," Kane said.

3. The Wild respond in the second. Minnesota didn't have the best start but they regained momentum and erased a deficit in the second period. It's not that their chances were that much better than the Blackhawks – it was a fairly even period in every way, from shots on goal (16-15 Blackhawks) to overall play. But coach Joel Quenneville didn't like how the Blackhawks played on Nino Niederreiter or Chris Stewart's goals, calling the mistakes made on them, "cardinal sins."

[SHOP: Gear up, Blackhawks fans!]

4. Quiet night for the top line. Outside of Marian Hossa, the Blackhawks' top line didn't do much on Sunday night. Hossa had two shots on goal. Jonathan Toews had none, as it was another too-quiet night for the Blackhawks' captain. 

5. Minnesota keeps the rivalry edge. Remember those three consecutive springs in which the Blackhawks dispatched the Wild? Well, the past two seasons may not be equal in payback terms but the Wild are nevertheless tilting the rivalry – at least in regular-season games – in their favor. The Wild won all five games last season and took the first of this season, as well. Minnesota made some good offseason moves, including acquiring Eric Staal in July. Full marks to the Wild: right now, they are the cream of the Western Conference crop.