O'Donnell likely won't return to Hawks, but still wants to play in NHL

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O'Donnell likely won't return to Hawks, but still wants to play in NHL

Its unlikely that Sean ODonnell will wear a Chicago Blackhawks uniform in 2012-13. But the veteran defenseman would still like to play somewhere next season.

ODonnell played in a diminished role for the Blackhawks last season, something he figured would likely happen when he signed with them last summer. And while it appears his time is done in Chicago, ODonnell, who will turn 41 in October, is still hoping to play his 20th NHL season somewhere.

I would like to play; I think I showed I can still play in the right circumstance, ODonnell said on Sunday. Maybe Im not even an 82-game guy or a 20-minute guy. But the right fit, a good system hopefully I can play.

Playing a lot of games was never a problem for ODonnell; prior to last season he played in 70 or more games every season since 2002-03. But ODonnell suited up for just 51 games with the Blackhawks, his lowest games played since his 1996-97 season with Los Angeles (55 games). He had no goals and seven assists, and finished minus-6, in those 51 games.

The Blackhawks are always looking for depth at defenseman, and theyll also look to adding size along the blue line next season. Theyve already re-signed Johnny Oduya to a three-year extension, and Dylan Olsen made good strides in his rookie season. But its unlikely ODonnell is part of the plans moving forward.

There are no hard feelings, but I think its one and done, ODonnell said of his time here. I saw a situation where I thought I could help the Blackhawks. It didnt quite work.

Like other players, ODonnell will be waiting to see what happens with the CBA talks, and if it affects the length of the 2012-13 season. But if there is hockey to be played, ODonnell would like to be a part of it.

July 1 is going to roll around, and maybe something will happen, he said.

After 20 years, Dan Sharp steps down as Joliet Catholic head coach

After 20 years, Dan Sharp steps down as Joliet Catholic head coach

Joliet Catholic Academy head football coach Dan Sharp has resigned his coaching position at the school and will retain his athletic director position.

"It was time," Sharp said. "It's been a long, great and wonderful coaching career for me coaching the Hilltoppers, and now it's the right time to step aside. It's been an emotional drain handling both jobs. I'm going to miss the kids and the coaches, but also it was just time."

Sharp hired assistant coach Jake Jaworski as the school's next varsity football coach. Jaworski, a teacher at Joliet Catholic Academy, was also a multi-sport athlete and starting defensive back on Joliet Catholic's state-championship teams in 2000 and 2001.

"It's not very often that you are allowed to hand-pick your successor," Sharp said. "Jaws is more than ready to take over the program and bring in some excitement, and I know that I'm leaving the football program into great hands."

Sharp, who posted a 199-51 record in 20 seasons at Joliet Catholic (223-69 record overall in 24 years), is also excited to help his new head coach take over the reins of one of the state's traditional power programs.

"I'm looking forward to getting Jake off to a good start."

White Sox chairman Jerry Reinsdorf knows 'it will be very hard to trade' Chris Sale

White Sox chairman Jerry Reinsdorf knows 'it will be very hard to trade' Chris Sale

NATIONAL HARBOR, Md. — The baseball world has come to suburban DC for the winter meetings. In a hotel just steps away from the Potomac River, the White Sox are holding onto the biggest fish available.

But trading their ace Chris Sale might be tougher than it seems because of the White Sox steep asking price. Will any team meet their demands? That’s the question.

"You have to have four prospects who can’t possibly miss to get one," White Sox chairman Jerry Reinsdorf told CSN. "I’ve seen so many players over the years who were going to be phenoms, they were going to be future Hall of Famers, and we don’t even remember what their names are anymore. That’s why when you’re trading a player of stature you’ve got to get multiple can’t-miss prospects back. That’s why it makes it tough to trade a player of great stature."

With the meetings in their hometown this year, the Washington Nationals could make quite the splash by acquiring Sale, which would give them a dominating 1-2 punch with Sale and Max Scherzer, not to mention Stephen Strasburg. The Nationals have the pieces to pull off such a deal, but they’ve reportedly been unwilling to trade their top prospect, Trea Turner, a 23-year-old who slashed .342/.370/.567 in 307 at-bats after getting called up last season. He can play second base, shortstop and center field. Oh, and he also stole 33 bases.

But Sale is no slouch himself. He’s finished in the top six in AL Cy Young voting in each of the last five seasons. And then there's his salary. He’s owed $12 million for 2017, with club options for each of the following two seasons at $12.5 million and $13.5 million. That’s three years for $38 million. Compare that with top free-agent pitcher Rich Hill, who is 10 years older than Sale and reportedly got a three-year, $48 million contract when he signed with the Los Angeles Dodgers on Monday. This is one of the weakest free-agent classes for starting pitchers we’ve ever seen.

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On the surface, the White Sox hold all the cards. But so far teams are holding onto their top prospects like gold and have been unwilling to deal them even for one of the best pitchers in the game.

Knowing what Sale has meant to the franchise, Reinsdorf admitted "it will be very hard to trade him."

For it to happen, the White Sox don’t sound like they are willing to put Sale in the clearance section.

"We’d have to really feel we were coming back with a lot of goods, a lot of merchandise," Reinsdorf said.

But for the first time, the White Sox are open to trading Sale, an idea few could fathom a year ago.

"I’ve said it many, many times, I’ve only had one player that couldn’t be traded (Michael Jordan), and the only reason he couldn’t be traded was that I would have been shot dead the day after,” Reinsdorf said. “We love our players, and we want our players when their careers are over to say that 'the best place I played was with the White Sox.' But again our obligation is to the fans to make our teams as good as we can make them, and we have to look at the players basically as assets and if we can make a team better by trading somebody no matter how much we love the guy, we have to go ahead and do it.

"Having said that, I don’t know what’s going to happen here."