Quenneville: The refereeing tonight was a disgrace

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Quenneville: The refereeing tonight was a disgrace

Coach Joel Quenneville spoke in a hushed tone, the one he usually falls into after a loss. But his words were anything but quiet.

Quenneville called the refereeing a disgrace, in Game 3, the one in which Marian Hossa was hit high by Raffi Torres and no official saw it or called a penalty in the Blackhawks 3-2 overtime loss. The hit had the Blackhawks angry immediately, as Hossa lay motionless on the ice and Torres wasnt whistled for any infraction Brandon Bollig got two, a roughing and a 10-minute misconduct, when he went after Torres.

It was a brutal hit, Quenneville said. You can have a multiple choice question its All the Above.

Quenneville said the Hossa play happened right in front of him in the first period.

I had a hard time. I saw exactly what happened, he said. How four guys missed it tonight, it was hard. The refereeing tonight was a disgrace.

Quenneville wasnt asked, nor did he talk about, any other calls in the game. But the first one was probably more than enough. While Hossa was back home by the end of the night after underdoing tests at the hospital Dr. Michael Terry said in a statement that Hossas expected to make a full recovery its little consolation. The Blackhawks didnt get a power-play on the ice; now theyll wait to see if Torres gets any supplemental discipline off it.

Several coaches have criticized officials already this postseason. But its easy to see it from their end. This postseason has been rough, brutal in some cases please see the last game between the Pittsburgh Penguins and Philadelphia Flyers. Players are getting hurt, and if things dont change, the NHL runs the risk of worse injuries happening.

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Bears DL Akiem Hicks making the most of a chance the Saints never gave him

Living well is indeed the best revenge, and sometimes nothing feels sweeter than proving doubters wrong. Akiem Hicks is savoring that exact feeling.

When the New Orleans Saints made Hicks their third-round pick in the 2013 draft, they typecast their big (6-5, 318 pounds) young defensive lineman as a one-trick pony.

“There were people in New Orleans that said, ‘You can’t rush the passer,’” Hicks recalled after the Bears’ win Sunday over the San Francisco 49ers. “They told me from my rookie year, ‘You’re going to be a run-stopper.’”

This despite Hicks collecting 6.5 sacks and 3 pass breakups as a senior at Regina in Canada. The Saints forced Hicks into the slot they’d decided he fit – nose tackle – then eventually grew disenchanted with him and traded him to New England last year – where he collect 3 sacks in spot duty.

Interestingly, Bears GM Ryan Pace was part of the Saints’ personnel operation. Whether Pace agreed with coaches’ handling of Hicks then isn’t known, but when Pace had the chance to bring Hicks to Chicago for a role different than the one the Saints forced Hicks into, Pace made it happen.

Pace likely saw those New England sacks as a foreshadowing or a sign that the New Orleans staff had miscast Hicks. The Bears defensive end now is under consideration for NFC defensive player of the week after his 10-tackle performance against San Francisco. Signing with the Bears last March 13 as a free agent was the career break Hicks has craved. For him it was a career lifeline.

“They have given me the ability to go rush the passer,” Hicks said. “So I love this organization – [GM] Ryan Pace, coach Fox, Vic [Fangio, defensive coordinator] – for just giving a guy the capability to put it out there and do what you feel like you can do.”

[MORE BEARS: Back from scary concussion, Leonard Floyd playing like franchise pass rusher Bears craved]

Hicks has been showing what he can do, to quarterbacks. For him the best part of win over the 49ers was the two third-quarter sacks of 49ers quarterback Colin Kaepernick.

Those sacks gave the massive lineman, who the Saints said couldn’t rush the passer, 6 sacks for the season – more than any member of the Saints defense this season. It has been a classic instance of putting a player in position to maximize his skills, not jam someone into a bad fit.

“Akiem has been in a couple of different types of packages before with New Orleans and New England,” said coach John Fox. The Patriots switched from a long-time 3-4 scheme to a 4-3 but “we’re more of a New England-type style. But we’re playing him more at end; he played mostly a nose tackle [in New Orleans]. He’s fit really well for us as far as his physical stature.

"But he does have pass rush ability. It shows a little about his athleticism. So he’s got a combination of both.”

That “combination” has been allowed to flourish at a new level, and the Bears’ plan for Hicks was the foundation of why he wanted to sign in Chicago as a free agent. The Bears do not play their defensive linemen in a clear one-gap, get-upfield-fast scheme tailored to speed players. Nor do they play a classic two-gap, linemen-control-blockers scheme typically built on three massive space-eaters on the defensive line.

They play what one player has called a “gap and a half” system, which requires being stout as well as nimble.

One Hicks rush on Kaepernick featured a deft spin move out of a block, not the norm for 336-pound linemen. He got one sack with a quick slide out of a double-team.

“I’m not freelancing,” Hicks said. “But I’m rushing ‘fast.’ There’s a portion of the defense where you have the [run] responsibility and don’t have the freedom or liberty [to rush]. It’s a great system for me and I love what they’ve let me do.”