Toews eager to get back on the ice, forget the lockout

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Toews eager to get back on the ice, forget the lockout

Jonathan Toews spent four months talking about the lockout, about up-and-down negotiations and about what he was going to do if there was no NHL hockey this season.

So, was it nice for the Blackhawks captain to talk training camp and the upcoming Blackhawks season on Wednesday instead of the L word?

Sure is, said Toews, who along with Duncan Keith, Brent Seabrook and Niklas Hjalmarsson, returned to Johnnys IceHouse West for informal skates.

Its just more of a relief, Toews continued. There are two sides of it. Theres the excitement just around the fact that we havent played hockey in so long, and were so excited to get back in front of our fans. But its also to be together on a daily basis.

Theyll soon be together plenty. League training camps are expected to begin on Sunday, and the Blackhawks will get a tough test out of the gate when they face the Stanley Cup-champion Kings in Los Angeles on Jan. 19.

For Toews, the frustration and anger for how long it took to get the season going again is still somewhat there. He said both sides need to learn from this lockout, to have a mutual understanding, respect and work hard together for the fans and for the good of the game. But after using the lockout to stay sharp physically and recharge mentally and not to play in Europe -- Toews is looking forward.

Some guys feel like they need to keep playing. For me, I felt it was good for my body and mind to rest and get myself in a place that Ill be in control of what Im able to do on and off the ice for the next handful of years, Toews said. I dont feel burnt out by any means. Im excited to play hockey.

Now the real fun begins: a short training camp followed by a 48-game regular season. As Patrick Sharp said on Tuesday, its whoever can adjust the quickest and get off to a good start. Toews said it could resemble the midway point of the 2010-11 season, when the Cup-defending Blackhawks were fighting for their playoff lives from winter to spring.

The next thing you knew we found ourselves in the playoff hunt with six or eight teams, whatever it was. It felt like a playoff game every single night from beginning of February to the end of the regular season, Toews said. I see some similarities there. Its a race to the finish.

Whatever it is, Toews is ready for it, as are the rest of his teammates. Its been a long time coming. But the focus is on whats coming up, not the dreaded L word that already took away too much of this season.

Im back to that place where I love the game and Im excited to show up to the rink every day. Sometimes to get away from it for a little bit was a good thing, Toews said. So for me, that was a huge thing to try and take my physical abilities to the next level. Now its time to translate that into how I play on the ice.

Eric Semborski gets his own hockey card as Blackhawks' emergency goalie

Eric Semborski gets his own hockey card as Blackhawks' emergency goalie

Eric Semborski lived out his childhood dream by calling himself a National Hockey League goaltender for one day, and he will never forget it.

Now there's proof nobody will.

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Topps revealed Wednesday that it has produced a trading card for the 23-year-old after he signed a one-day contract on an amateur tryout basis to serve as the emergency backup goaltender for the Blackhawks in Saturday's contest against the Philadelphia Flyers.

While he didn't see any action, Semborski said after the game that absorbing shots during warmups from some of the best players in the league was “the best 20 minutes of my life.”

Add this to the memory bank of a story that keeps getting better.

Jonathan Toews donates $1 million to community center in Winnipeg

Jonathan Toews donates $1 million to community center in Winnipeg

Jonathan Toews was the highest paid player in the NHL this past year, and he's giving back to the community that helped him become one of the best players in the league.

The Blackhawks captain donated $1 million to the Dakota Community Centre in Winnipeg, where he was born and raised, making it the largest ever private donation to a community centre in Manitoba.

“From my earliest days playing hockey, Dakota Community Centre has always played a pivotal role in my upbringing and my career," Toews said in a statement. “Today, I continue to be honoured to have my name associated with the Sportsplex on the Dakota campus. My parents have instilled in me the importance of giving back, and I believe that in supporting Dakota, we will see endless possibilities for the Community Centre’s future and transformation in the lives of our community members.”

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Toews will also serve as the honorary chairman for the Dakota Futures Capital Campaign, which will support the construction of a new 60,000-square-foot, $20-million fieldhouse and future development of the campus.

The fieldhouse will include a 30,000-square-foot gymnasium that will contain multiple court sports, such as basketball and volleyball, sport training and conditioning, all of which will be connected to the Jonathan Toews Sportsplex. It's expected to open in the fall of 2017.

The Sportsplex was named in Toews' honor in 2010, and includes two indoor ice rinks, a gymnasium, and strength training facilities, among others.

“We are so proud that Jonathan has chosen to give back to the community in this way," said Toews' parents Andrée Gilbert and Bryan Toews. "Our family has such fond memories of hockey practices and friendships made at the Dakota Community Centre. We look forward to the opening of the new Fieldhouse and the continued growth of the Dakota  campus. Through programs for all ages and acting as a gathering place in our community, the Dakota Community Centre transforms thousands of lives each year."