Ask Aggrey: Boozer, Stoudemire trading places?

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Ask Aggrey: Boozer, Stoudemire trading places?

It's the second round of the playoffs and I don't have a flight to catch, a hotel to check into, a morning shootaround to attend or a daily commute on the Edens Expressway to the Berto Center. For the last part, I'm especially thankful, but watching the second round of the playoffs, it feels strange to already be back in Chicago for good. I'm not complaining about being able to sleep in my own bed for consecutive nights, but I had prepared both my mind and body to be going through the daily grind of the NBA's second season into June or so.

Even after Derrick Rose got hurt, I thought the Bulls had a good chance to get back to the conference finals and after Joakim Noah's injury, I figured a conference-semifinals appearance was still possible. But all that's in the past and while I'll still be covering the happenings of the Bulls throughout the offseason, things will definitely slow down and until training camp, this mailbag will become a monthly occurrence, instead of weekly.

Don't be a stranger, as I'll still be here to answer your questions about free agency, potential trades, the upcoming draft, the Olympics, summer league and even the other teams still in the playoffs. By the way, the Professional Basketball Writers Association, a group yours truly is a member of, recently announced the winners of their annual awards, minus the J. Walter Kennedy Citizenship Award, which will be released later in the week.

Phoenix's Steve Nash won the Magic Johnson Award for the player who best combines on-court excellence with cooperation with the media over Minnesota's Kevin Love, San Antonio's Manu Ginobili and Chris Paul of the Clippers, Boston's Doc Rivers won the Rudy Tomjanovich Award for essentially the same qualities in a coach over Denver's George Karl, Orlando's Stan Van Gundy and Rick Carlisle of the Mavericks, and the Milwaukee Bucks won the Brian McIntyre Award for the league's top media-relations staff over fellow nominees Oklahoma City, Memphis and none other than the Bulls. On to this week's mailbag:

Could there be any talks between the Knicks and the Bulls about a Carlos Boozer for Amar'e Stoudemire deal? -- Eric C.
Eric, as much as Bulls fans are down on Carlos right now, like Rip Hamilton, it's highly unlikely that he's going anywhere this summer. Look, it's no secret around the league that he doesn't have a great contract, particularly if he declines as a player toward the end of the deal. The Knicks know this and while they've had issues meshing Stoudemire and Carmelo Anthony, Carlos doesn't necessarily help them get better, as his jump-shooting, face-up game mirrors Stoudemire's, minus the athleticism and with less post-up play. Also, while Stoudemire might be somewhat of an upgrade, he's also injury-prone and if the Bulls passed on him in free agency two years ago, they aren't more likely to take a gander on him now, with all of that uninsured money left on his contract.

Do you think that the Bulls can get O.J. Mayo this off-season? -- Irron C.

Irron, I know that since Mayo's name came up as a potential Bulls target before last season's trade deadline, he's been discussed amongst fans and media alike as a potential addition. However, I'm pretty sure that ship has sailed for a number of reasons, foremost being that the Bulls already have a starting shooting guard for the upcoming season in Rip. Furthermore, assuming Memphis' asking price hasn't changed, Omer Asik or Taj Gibson are not even remote possibilities to be dealt in any type of sign-and-trade scenario.

Mayo's reputation has improved since he so willingly accepted and thrived in a reserve role after his ill-fated team plane card-game fight with teammate Tony Allen, but the Bulls value character so highly, the front office would be hard-pressed to bring in a player who could even potentially disrupt the team's chemistry. Lastly, the Bulls have little financial flexibility, so unless the restricted free agent's market value is far less than expected, it's unlikely that he'll end up in Chicago.

There's been a lot of talk around the NBA about players flopping (cough LeBron cough), do you think it's becoming a bigger problem? -- Tyler E

Tyler, I don't know if flopping in the NBA is more of a problem than it's been in the past, especially when I think back to the heyday of the Sacramento Kings a decade or so ago, when several of their players, most notably Vlade Divac, took it to a new level. I actually think this season's playoffs have been pretty physical thus far, though I may be biased from watching the Bulls, a team that almost never exaggerates contact, play all year. That said, I have taken notice of some of the obvious flopping by some of the other playoff teams, including the Heat. I'm no Jeff Van Gundy, but I do agree that it should be officiated somehow and maybe penalized with a delay of game as a warning, then subsequent technical fouls.

Something related that I think needs to be watched more closely is offensive players intentionally drawing contact on "rip-through" moves and also using pump fakes to get their man in the air, then drawing contact with no actual intention of making the shot, the former of which was supposedly a point of emphasis for officials heading into the season.

When do you think we will see D-Rose next on the court? I've heard everything from February of next year to him missing a whole season. -- Evelyn T.

Evelyn, the timetable for recovery from ACL surgery can vary from athlete to athlete -- I remember seeing current Houston Rockets guard Kyle Lowry bounce back from the same injury and play at a high level in summer leagues in four months while he was a college player at Villanova -- but after Derrick's procedure, it was reported that he should be back in 8-10 months and back to the court by early December at the earliest. Personally, as bad as I can imagine Derrick is aching to play basketball again after the rough season he had, I'm guessing that no part of the process is rushed and he actually starts playing for the Bulls again around the All-Star break, though he could certainly start working out and then practicing long before that. Ultimately, his body will dictate his return, but I guarantee you that all attempts at caution will be exercised by the team, no matter how the Bulls are faring at the time.

Taj Gibson really impressed me, especially when Joakim went down. Will we see him have a bigger role next season? -- Marty H.

Marty, Taj really rises to the occasion in the playoffs, doesn't he? From last year's postseason, particularly in the conference finals against Miami, to this season's first-round series against Philadelphia, he's truly stepped his game up on a national stage, which should result in the Bulls having to pay a high price to keep him when he hits free agency next summer. But as far as him getting a bigger role, while I believe Tom Thibodeau really trusts him, especially on the defensive end of the court, the Bulls simply don't have enough frontcourt scoring with both him and Joakim on the court together for an extended period of time.

With Derrick and possibly Luol Deng out to start next season, the Bulls will have to rely upon Carlos (and Rip, for that matter) for scoring, which means Taj's role will probably stay the same, though a slight bump in minutes wouldn't shock me. Now, if he can continue to develop his mid-range jumper and back-to-the-basket game, he may have more of a featured role while he's on the floor, which would really benefit both Taj and a potentially retooled "Bench Mob" when he's playing against second-unit players.

After wild seventh, Carson Fulmer wants another big-time opportunity for White Sox

After wild seventh, Carson Fulmer wants another big-time opportunity for White Sox

The White Sox called up Carson Fulmer from Double-A Birmingham a week ago with the expectation he could add a strong, powerful arm to the back end of a bullpen that’s been taxed quite a bit this season. 

After he struggled in his first high-leverage appearance in the majors, though, the White Sox remain confident their 2015 first-round pick will be an important part of the team’s bullpen down the stretch this summer. 

Fulmer only threw 12 of 30 pitches for strikes and allowed three game-deciding runs in seventh inning of the White Sox 7-5 loss to the Detroit Tigers in front of 22,611 at U.S. Cellular Field Friday night. The leverage indexes of Fulmer’s first two appearances on the West Coast — which spanned 2 2/3 scoreless innings — were .01 and .05 (a leverage index of 1 is average), with those coming in a 8-1 loss and a 6-1 win. On Friday, Fulmer’s leverage index was 2.98. 

Fulmer said nerves weren’t behind his erratic outing, in which plenty of those 18 balls weren’t close to the strike zone. 

“I want to be in those situations,” the 22-year-old Fulmer said. “When you go out there and don’t do your job, it’s obviously frustrating. But you have to have a quick memory and throw it over your shoulder and prepare yourself for tomorrow.”

Fulmer’s electric mid-90’s fastball and wipeout curveball were rendered ineffective by his inability to command them in his two-thirds of an inning. He walked Justin Upton, gave up a single to Tyler Collins and walked Jarrod Saltalamacchia to load the bases with nobody out, and after a pair of groundouts brought a run in, he walked Cameron Maybin to re-load the bases.

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After that walk, Fulmer was pulled in favor of Nate Jones, who surrendered a go-ahead, ultimately game-winning two-run single to Tigers All-Star first baseman Miguel Cabrera. 

At some point, the White Sox were going to have to test Fulmer. With starter Jacob Turner only lasting 3 1/3 innings, and Fulmer looking comfortable in his first two appearances in the majors, manager Robin Ventura calculated that the seventh inning Friday was a prime opportunity. 

“He’s going to have to have it sooner or later,” Ventura said. “From the way the first (two) went, we felt comfortable he was going to come in there and be able to do that. But tonight, that doesn’t happen. But you have the confidence he can come back from this and be very effective in that spot.”

Morneau, who’s provided offense for bullpens over 14 major league seasons, agreed with his manager’s confidence in Fulmer. 

“We see a lot of good things in him,” Morneau said. “It’s obviously not up to me, but hopefully we get him back out there quick and let him settle back down and get comfortable, because he can really help this team.” 

White Sox relievers entered Friday with the fifth-highest leverage index in baseball, a product of the high volume of one-, two- and three-run games this team has found itself in this season. All those stressful innings — as well as Jake Petricka’s season-ending injury and Zach Putnam’s elbow issue from which he isn’t likely to return anytime soon — have put a considerable strain on Jones, Dan Jennings, Matt Albers, Zach Duke and David Robertson.

Fulmer, by virtue of being in the White Sox bullpen, will get another opportunity at a high-leverage inning. And while his first foray into a pressure-packed relief appearance didn’t go well, he hopes to quickly get a chance to put Friday in the rearview mirror. 

“I can’t ever use the excuse of it being my first big-time experience, especially for me being put in that situation,” Fulmer said. “Hopefully I get the opportunity to do it again. I’ll continue to stay prepared, just like I was tonight, and hopefully the odds turn in my favor. That’s all I can control.” 

Sky see winning streak snapped in loss to Connecticut Sun

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Associated Press

Sky see winning streak snapped in loss to Connecticut Sun

ROSEMONT, ILL. 

Jonquel Jones had her first-career double-double with 20 points and 10 rebounds — both career highs — and Alex Bentley scored 21 points to help the Connecticut Sun beat the Chicago Sky 94-89 on Friday night.

Alyssa Thomas and Jasmine Thomas added 16 points apiece and Chiney Ogwumike had 10 for the Sun (8-16).

Jones scored five consecutive points to cap a 13-4 run that gave Connecticut a 78-74 lead with 4 minutes left and the Sun led the rest of the way. Connecticut hit all eight of its free-throw attempts in the final 42 seconds to seal it.

Elena Delle Donne led Chicago (11-13) with 20 points. Cappie Pondexter added 16 points, and Tamera Young had 14.

The Sun, ranked 11th in the AP WNBA power poll, made 26 of 32 free-throw attempts — both season highs and committed a season-low seven turnovers.

The fifth-ranked Sky shot 52.3 percent (34 of 65) from the field.

Game changer: Dexter Fowler’s return fuels Cubs in Milwaukee

Game changer: Dexter Fowler’s return fuels Cubs in Milwaukee

MILWAUKEE – Cubs fans, Dexter Fowler feels your pain: “It sucks being on the couch and watching your team struggle.”

It only took five pitches on Friday night at Miller Park before Fowler answered the questions about how much this lineup missed his presence and how long it would take him to get back into a rhythm.

“You go, we go” is what manager Joe Maddon tells Fowler, and a sellout crowd of 42,243 roared when the All-Star leadoff guy hammered a 94-mph Jimmy Nelson fastball off the black batter’s eye in center field, setting the first-inning tone in a 5-2 win over the Milwaukee Brewers.

“I was just happy to be back around the boys,” Fowler said after going 3-for-4 with a walk, three RBI and two runs scored in his return. “It’s like being back home.”

Fowler’s strained right hamstring alone doesn’t begin to explain all this, because he had been hitting .207 in June, the rotation cooled off, the bullpen became unreliable and a 24-games-in-24-days stretch wore this team out before the All-Star break. But the Cubs were 27 games over .500 and had a 12.5-game lead in the division on June 19, the night Fowler went on the disabled list with what sounded like a minor injury.

If panic didn’t completely set in around a first-place team, underlying issues kept bubbling to the surface, the Cubs losing 15 of their last 21 games before that summer vacation.

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But the second-half Cubs (58-37) now look energized, beating the American League’s best first-half team (Texas Rangers) and the defending National League champs (New York Mets) at Wrigley Field before rolling up Interstate 94 for a virtual home game.

Now here comes Fowler, who jumpstarted the offense again with the bases loaded in the second inning, lining a two-run double down the left-field line and saying postgame that he felt no lingering issues with the hamstring.

“He’s an asset at the top of the lineup,” winning pitcher Jason Hammel said. “Tough at-bat. And he can get you. It was nice to see him run around out there again.”

Yes, Hammel (9-5, 3.35 ERA) ate a handful of potato chips to help prevent cramping in the 86-degree heat, lasting five innings before five relievers combined to hold the Brewers (40-54) scoreless the rest of the night. For all the buzz about Theo Epstein’s front office upgrading the bullpen by the Aug. 1 trade deadline, Maddon may already have a shiny new toy in Carl Edwards Jr.

The skinny right-hander entered the game in the sixth inning, with a runner on second, and cut through the heart of Milwaukee’s order, forcing Ryan Braun to ground out and striking out Jonathan Lucroy and Chris Carter on six pitches combined.    

Just like that, the Cubs are getting answers from within, after all the outside noise screamed: Do something! The fans chanted “Let’s go, Cubbies!” before closer Hector Rondon got the final out and his 17th save. This is again looking like the team Fowler envisioned when he turned down the Baltimore Orioles for a one-year, $13 million guarantee, shocking the industry by showing up in Arizona in late February.     

“It’s really apparent how important he is to us,” Maddon said. “It just looked right.”