Bulls to pick up Thibodeau's option for next season

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Bulls to pick up Thibodeau's option for next season

In the midst of Tuesday's press conference to discuss Derrick Rose's recovery from ACL surgery, Bulls general manager Gar Forman dropped an interesting nugget, not that it escaped notice: Tom Thibodeau's option for next season will be exercised by the team.

However, Forman didn't resolve the ongoing saga of whether the Bulls head coach would receive a contract extension in the near future.

"It hasnt changed since we talked, I think it was a month or two ago," Forman said Tuesday at Rush University Medical Center. "Toms option will be picked up and we started having conversations about an extension with him in the fall, and we hope to continue those discussions now that were in the offseason. We value Tom greatly. We values what he brings to the organization, what hes brought to the team. We think hes one of finest coaches in the league and were hopeful that hell be our coach long-term.

Thibodeau chimed in on the situation: "Im not worried about that. Those things all take care of themselves."

In his first public comments since the Bulls' season ended at the hands of Philadelphia last Thursday, Thibodeau reflected on his team's campaign, which was riddled by injuries and ended in a disappointing first-round playoff exit, though the Bulls again had the league's best regular-season record.

"In the end, there will be one team thats satisfied. As I said at the end of the season, I was disappointed in our loss, but not disappointed in our team. Our team gave everything they had and thats all you can ask of your team, so we fell short and we have to look forward to the challenge next year," he said.

"You dont want to look backwards. You want to obviously learn and move forward. Going into the playoffs, the two things that you have to have is one, you need to be playing well and two, you have to have your health. Those things are critical, so we fell short, but we had a number of guys that were injured and I thought our bench was terrific all year long, and I think we fell short in the end, but overall, I thought our team did fine."

The notoriously hard-charging coach did say that he'll take some time for himself before returning to the grind of preparing for next season, as well as next month's draft and the summer's free agency.

"I will," he admitted. "Right now, I wanted to be around with Derrick going through this and then, Ill take some time and then, decompress for a week or so, and then get back at it."

Progress and Promise: Title IX at 40, a White Paper

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USA TODAY

Progress and Promise: Title IX at 40, a White Paper

Title IX emerged from social and cultural shifts in the American gender order. Its legal ripples created controversy and pushback from many men who sat atop sport infrastructures from Little Leagues to the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA). It has provided women and advocates of female sport participation with a legal tool to advance opportunity for girls and women in education and sport.

Over time, many parents, educators, administrators and government leaders fell in step with its vision and ethic of fair play. Today, thanks to a growing body of research, the advocates for reform in sport and education increasingly base their claims and visions on evidence rather than myth or ideology. And it is out of these historical changes, knowledge production and celebration of its inception that the 2012 Title IX at 40: Progress and Promise—Equity for All conference was born.

Download the full White Paper to learn how far we’ve come…and what work is left to do.

LEARN MORE AT WOMEN’S SPORTS FOUNDATION

The Decade of Decline: Gender Equity in High School Sports

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USA TODAY

The Decade of Decline: Gender Equity in High School Sports

“The Decade of Decline: Gender Equity in High School Sports,” a study co-authored by Don Sabo, Ph.D., Director, Center for Research on Physical Activity, Sports & Health (CRPASH), D’Youville College, and Philip Veliz, Ph.D., Post-Doctoral Fellow, University of Michigan, analyzes data from the Department of Education’s Office for Civil Rights (OCR) Data Collection on girls’ and boys’ high school athletic opportunities between the 1999-2000 and 2009-10 school years. This is the second in the “Progress Without Equity” research report series.

Key findings from “The Decade of Decline: Gender Equity in High School Sports” include:

  • Athletic participation opportunities expanded across the decade, but boys’ allotment grew more than girls. By 2009-10, 53 athletic opportunities were offered for every 100 boys, compared with 41 opportunities for every 100 girls.
  • Despite the level of economic resources, the opportunity gap between girls and boys continued to increase. By 2010 girls participated in greater numbers than in the beginning of the decade; however, girls’ share of total athletic opportunities decreased across the decade as compared to boys’ share. During a decade of expanding athletic participation opportunities across U.S. high schools, boys received more opportunities than girls, and boys’ opportunities grew faster than those of girls.
  • By 2009-10 boys still received disproportionately more athletic opportunities than girls in all community settings—urban, suburban, towns, and rural communities.
  • In 2000, 8.2 percent of schools offered no sports programs, the percentage nearly doubled by 2010, rising to approximately 15 percent. Additionally, schools with disproportionately higher female enrollments (i.e., the student body is 56 percent female or higher) were more likely to have dropped interscholastic sports between 2000 and 2010.
  • Seven percent of public schools lost sports programs between 2000 and 2010, while less than one percent added sports to their curriculum. Given this trend in the data, it is estimated that by the year 2020, 27 percent of U.S. public high schools (4,398 schools) would be without any interscholastic sports, translating to an estimated 3.4 million young Americans (1,658,046 girls and 1,798,782 boys) who would not have any school-based sports activities to participate in by 2020 if the trend continues.

 

LEARN MORE AT WOMEN’S SPORTS FOUNDATION