Fans must put trust in Rose

749764.png

Fans must put trust in Rose

In Rose we have to trust

I'm trying to find a silver lining. If Derrick Rose believes God does things for a reason, then what is the lesson here? Only Rose can answer that, but I have a few ideas of my own. Surely you can make all kinds of connections between Rose's injury-plagued season and the shortened NBA schedule, managing his minutes properly, and just the sheer nature of his game. But this isn't about blame, it's about getting it right for the future, and that responsibility will fall largely on Rose who needs to take this devastating setback to learn how to come back stronger, better.

It will take patience and it will take trust.

Dr. Michael Terry at the Northwestern University Department of Orthopedic Surgery told Comcast Sportsnet that once Rose's rehab is complete, it will still take him a while to fully trust his knee again. Trust it will do what he wants it to do or expects it do, and we will have to trust Rose: trust him to manage his health, listen to his body, and be smart in securing the longevity of his career.

There is nothing wrong, in and of itself, of being competitive and wanting to go all out, giving the game everything you've got and always wanting to win. This way of thinking is in the blood that courses through Derrick Rose's veins, and coach Tom Thibodeau's too,for that matter. But managing that drive is equally as important.

I'm not suggesting that Rose has to completely change his game or change the way he plays. I'm saying he needs to manage his intensity better.

On a much different level and much smaller scale, I can relate.

Pre-marriage and motherhood, I raced Ironman triathlons. For those of you who don't know what that is, it's an endurance race of 140.6 miles broken down like this: 2.4 mile swim, 112 mile bike and a 26.2 mile run. It was a hobby, but I was obsessed with it. I over-trained and under-recovered until one day I snapped my right Achilles tendon. Different injury than an ACL tear, but the recovery time on a torn Achilles is actually longer. You can't even start running for at least 9 months.

In my stubborn, overly competitive spirit, I was determined to get back to racing as soon as possible. I willed my way through rehab and within 16 months I was racing Ironman Wisconsin. I barely finished the race, so I hopped in Ironman Florida two months later and had a better showing. Both were stupid ideas.

I rushed my recovery and raced on a weak right leg that was not prepared to handle the stress I was putting it under. The entire left side of my body paid a price because of compensation. Needless to say, that was my last Ironman race. Since then, I have had one injury after the other to my left foot, left ankle, left knee, left IT band and left hip.

I implore Rose to not rush his recovery for the sake of getting back onto the court as quickly as possible. Any weaknesses can trigger a whole host of problems. He may be able to come back mid-way through next season, or he may miss the entire campaign. This is one time Rose has to set aside will and determination and defer to smarts, common sense and trust.

He will have to trust in the expert advisors who will guide his rehab and strengthen his body.

He will have to trust what his body is telling him.

He will have to trust whether or not he should tape his ankles or wear the special ankle braces Adidas made for him.

He will have to trust that his coach will manage his minutes properly and if not, speak up.

He will have to trust that backing off in games does not mean he's dogging it.

He will have to trust himself to know when to dial it down and when to ramp it up.

The future of his career depends on all of this. How he handles his rehab and recovery will tell us if he's learned anything from this and if he's serious about preserving his career.

All we can do is trust.

Morning Update: Dwyane Wade comes up clutch in close win vs. Kings

update-121.jpg
AP

Morning Update: Dwyane Wade comes up clutch in close win vs. Kings

Dwyane Wade gets a little help but saves the day defensively vs. Kings

Sunday on CSN: UIC travels to Valparaiso

One-goal victories are great but Blackhawks’ method has to change

Bears numbers don't indicate 3-13, yet still lie

Road Ahead: Blackhawks play three home games before All-Star break

Blackhawks acquire Michael Latta from Kings in swap of minor leaguers

Phillips DT Chris Elmore commits to Syracuse

Dwyane Wade gets a little help but saves the day defensively vs. Kings

Dwyane Wade gets a little help but saves the day defensively vs. Kings

It was a gift and the Bulls weren't going to look it in the mouth as Dwyane Wade was poised to finish off another one of his sterling defensive plays with a breakaway dunk with the game tied and Arron Afflalo and DeMarcus Cousins trailing.

Lightly touched by the small of his back by Cousins, Wade miscalculated his liftoff and missed the dunk but was bailed out by the refs for a foul with 14 seconds left.

Then, he bailed the Bulls out.

Wade had his fifth fourth-quarter defensive play, stripping Cousins on a steal on the ensuing possession with the Sacramento Kings having a chance to win, leading to a Michael Carter-Williams dunk and finishing a 102-99 win Saturday night at the United Center.

It was a clock-turning performance for Wade on both ends of the floor, even if his missed dunk is a reminder that he is 35 years old. 

"I took off too far as I look at the instant replay," Wade said. "I should've took maybe one more dribble. Can't say I felt 35, I just took off too far (laughs). But hey, sometimes you get calls, sometimes you don't. I'm a person who hasn't gotten a lot all year so I'm not gonna apologize for nothing."

Stripping Cousins on his spin move was the finale, but he swatted an Arron Afflalo corner triple in the fourth, smothered Ty Lawson at the rim twice for blocked shots to end the third and tortured Lawson again in the fourth for another steal that led to him following up a Jimmy Butler missed layup with a follow and foul.

"Just a read," said Wade on stripping Cousins. "We knew he was gonna go to DeMarcus at that point. Once we forced him left, I knew he had to come back to the right hand. And being in the right place at the right time, the ball was right there for me."

Wade played like a desperate and motivated man, putting up 30 with six rebounds and four assists on the second night of a back-to-back is proof positive he took Friday's loss to Atlanta personally and used his play to back up those feelings.

He took to twitter to apologize for the poor effort against the Hawks, producing his best all-around performance as a Bull.

"We've been good in desperate moments," Wade said. "We haven't been good in non-desperate moments, when we win three in a row or playing a team that we should beat. But (in) the desperate moments I like us."

He scored 13 in the fourth, along with the last of his four blocked shots and all three of his steals took place in the final 12.

"I thought he was terrific," Bulls coach Fred Hoiberg said. "He was aggressive all game long, taking the ball to the basket, getting to the line 15 times. He came up with two big plays."

Hoiberg threw out different lineups and rotations, playing Paul Zipser as a sixth man and having the second-round draft pick close the game. Zipser took advantage, hitting three triples and scoring 13 points.

"I thought it was night and day from last night," Hoiberg said. "Our energy was really good all night long. We got just enough stops to find a way to win."

Cousins dominated the game with 42 and 14 rebounds in 35 minutes, the only Kings player in double figures all night.

"He was pretty much unguardable for the majority of the game, Taj did a solid job on him," Hoiberg said. "When Robin was on him, they put him on the perimeter and let him shoot threes. He's a monster."

Back-to-back triples from Cousins gave him 40 and tied the game at 97, as a third one rimmed out with a little under two minutes left.

Cousins dominated the start of the third quarter, hitting midrange jumpers over Lopez and taunting the Bulls bench after hitting a jumper to put the Kings ahead, 70-63 midway through the third.

But the Bulls stayed close, with Hoiberg choosing to sit Rajon Rondo for the second half after playing him six minutes in the second quarter, using Wade as a point guard and going with Carter-Williams for defense, along with Zipser, who didn't look scared of the moment.

"I like the wrinkle coach put in there, putting him in early," Wade said. "He gave him an opportunity and he helped us big time."

Butler scored 23 with seven assists and five rebounds in 39 minutes, didn't have to play the hero for once and made fun of Wade's apology tweet.

"He was due for a big night," Butler said. "He can tweet again if he can come out again and give us 30 and some big steals and big dunks."

"I think that's what called of him, to score baskets and guard. It's kinda sneaky. You never really expect it until it happens."

It looked like the worst was over when the Bulls made a short run to end the third, surviving the onslaught from Cousins — and surviving their own experimenting with Zipser instead of going with Denzel Valentine, switching things up altogether.

But the tone was set by the leaders, who can only manufacture but so much urgency on a nightly basis.

"I like this team when we're desperate," Wade said. "A desperate team, we're not bad."