Korver an assist man away from the game

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Korver an assist man away from the game

Bulls sharpshooter Kyle Korvers annual winter coat drive, which took place at the United Center prior to Saturdays home win over the Bobcats, seems like a nice gesture, the type of thing people will remember. But while the initiative, which benefited Victor Herbert Elementary School and the Mercy Home for Boys and Girls fans who donated either a new childrens coat or at least 15 were entitled to meet Korver afterwards and get an autograph got more visibility because of its timing, charitable work is just the norm for the swingman.

In past his past NBA stops, Philadelphia and Utah, Korver put his stamp on the community through his organization, the Kyle Korver Foundation. While with the Sixers, Korver was known for his work with youth in impoverished sections of North Philadelphia, and when he played for the Jazz, the three-point specialist was active in work with the handicapped community of Salt Lake City.

In Chicago, however, Korver has taken a different approach. Instead of starting entirely new initiatives, his foundation has mostly partnered with local organizations and enhanced ongoing efforts.

Well, we havent started our own initiative or anything, like we did in the other cities, but we found some really great organizations and weve partnered with them. Theres this school called Brown Elementary and its right over by the United Center, and weve done several things with them, partnering with a local church Soul City in the West Loop and also just some other random people, he told CSNChicago.com recently. We helped put together a couple Christmas stores, where we got a whole bunch of things donated, bought a bunch of things and let the families from that school come and buy all their Christmas presents, but a really discounted rate. So, you could buy a pair of Chuck Taylors Korver is an endorser for Converse for like two bucks, stuff like that. So, they still come, they still buy their stuff, but then we took the money and donated it to the school, too, and started a little art program, built a parents lounge, trying to get the parents more involved in the school and weve got a couple other projects weve been helping out with, with them.

Theres an organization called Breakthrough, which is also on the West Side. Its a great organization. Weve done several things with them, partnered with them in this thing called The Hunt, in like a month or two. Its basically a big scavenger hunt, sending people all over the place, raising money for Breakthrough and awareness, and things like that. It ends up in Wrigley Field, Korver continued. Klayton Korvers younger brother is working on a bunch of stuff. Were helping put together some concerts and selling our clothing line Seer, so weve got a bunch of these things going on. We havent found that one thing that were really angling for, like we did in the other cities because Im kind of waiting for the right opportunity.

But whether in Chicago or elsewhere, the devoutly religious Korver, who got married over the summer, believes he can always give back to the less fortunate.

People have been great. I think playing all across the country, theres people everywhere that want to do good things. I think lots of times, they dont know how to get involved or what to do. I think one of the biggest things that we try to do is just find ways to get a lot of people involved and partnering with people who already have great things going, and try to help them, but overall, theres good people everywhere. Youve just got to find them, he said. I think its just a part of my faith. Its just a big part of who I want to be. I feel like Gods given me a great platform and a lot of gifts, a lot of opportunities and you just try to take advantage of them. Its justtry to live out the Golden Rule.

After loss to Mavs, Wade says Bulls 'keep putting (their) hand on the hot stove every day'

After loss to Mavs, Wade says Bulls 'keep putting (their) hand on the hot stove every day'

Dwyane Wade sounded every bit like a frustrated 35-year old father when talking about the repeated ills and so-called growing pains of his Bulls, as they surrendered yet another game against a sub-.500 team.

Sometimes it's the New York Knicks whom the Bulls are offering temporary refuge. Or maybe the Minnesota Timberwolves as they are all-too-generous to roll out the welcome mat for returning figures to Chicago.

Tuesday it was the Dallas Mavericks, the second-worst team in the Western Conference, who stormed into the United Center and escaped with a 99-98 win, courtesy of Wesley Matthews' triple with 11.7 seconds left followed by him locking down Jimmy Butler on the ensuing possession.

Wade was forced to take a contested 21-footer that went awry, but the Bulls' ills went far beyond the last two possessions, when the Mavericks exploited their strategy yet again.

"Either you learn the lesson or figure out," Wade said. "Keep putting your hand on the hot stove every day.

"We just gotta figure out not to put our hands on that stove. And understand when we come in the kitchen, that stove is hot, don't touch it. As I continue to say, this is a very young team and they have to play in these games and have to go through these moments. The one thing you want, whether it's this year or next year, is to not make the same mistakes."

The Bulls are apparently insistent on touching the stove and keep burning themselves, the most recent time with the confusion or the bad strategy in defending the Mavericks' final offensive possession.

Deron Williams found himself with Nikola Mirotic defending him off a switch from Jimmy Butler. Not the quickest afoot, Mirotic gave Williams an easy path to the basket and Wade was the backside help, not wanting to leave Matthews on the wing for a triple.

But with the bench commanding Wade to help, Williams easily found Matthews for an open 3 as Wade had no help for his man. With the Bulls up two, one could see how Wade didn't want to leave Matthews.

"I'll have to go back and watch, but it looks like Deron got downcourt, Wade went over to help and we didn’t rotate accordingly," Bulls coach Fred Hoiberg said. "We obviously need to do a better job of staying in front of the other end."

Mirotic was supposed to be brought back slowly in his return from strep throat, but he played the entire fourth quarter and 22 minutes overall, having lost eight pounds with his illness that had him miss four games.

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Their issues were game-long and have been seasonlong as the Mavericks were supposed to absorb a shellacking from a Bulls team that felt a 25-point beatdown in Texas last month.

Instead, they would've been happy with settling for an escape when Butler rose up over his college teammate Matthews for a 20-foot wing jumper with 22.8 seconds left.

Butler nearly added a triple-double and clutch moment to his growing resume with 24 points, 12 assists and nine rebounds but was dogged by Matthews all night, the defender who wouldn't give him airspace, went chest-to-chest and even earned a technical foul when he felt Butler exaggerated some contact in the third quarter.

"He took away my space, wouldn't let me get to my spot," Butler said of Matthews. "Good for him. I should've did something different."

Wade missed 13 of his 21 shots, scoring 17 with five rebounds on his 35th birthday

With scoring at a premium, Robin Lopez had a season-high 21 points being guarded by Dirk Nowitzki — and they were necessary considering the Bulls were without Taj Gibson (ankle injury) and Doug McDermott couldn't repeat his 30-point showing from Sunday in Memphis.

Rick Carlisle has long been regarded as one of the top strategic coaches, and though he doesn't have the usual personnel from the Mavericks' salad days, he had enough tricks up his sleeve to throw the Bulls off.

Six Mavericks scored in double figures, led by Harrison Barnes' 20 points and Seth Curry's 18, as Barnes, Matthews and Curry combined for eight triples — spreading the Bulls out and picking them apart defensively.

The Mavericks started Nowitzki at center, going to an almost all-small lineup. And though Lopez scored 14 points in the first half, trying to feed him seemed to take the Bulls out of it in the second half.

The energy was tardy to the party, as they shot just 41 percent in the first half but woke up a little in the third quarter — continuing their all-too familiar trend of half-hearted efforts against lesser teams.

And it looks like the ever-optimistic Wade is dishing out some realism, probably something that comes with the perspective of turning 35.

"You can't keep getting stressed out or frustrated. We've been going through this all year. We'll get back in in the morning.

"Once you realize who you are, you're better off. I sleep better at night. Once we want to be a better team and start winning games, we will. I'm not mad, I'm not frustrated, I'm not stressed. Just taking the hits."

Bulls' Rajon Rondo oddly runs behind back of former coach Rick Carlisle

Bulls' Rajon Rondo oddly runs behind back of former coach Rick Carlisle

Is Rajon Rondo avoiding his former coach?

During Tuesday night's Bulls-Mavericks game, Rondo awkwardly ran behind Mavs coach Rick Carlisle as the third quarter was winding down.

Take a look at the play in the video above.

Rondo, who played with the Mavericks in the 2014-15 season, had a weird relationship with Carlisle. Most notably, he and Carlisle had a heated exchange during a game on Feb. 24, 2015 against the Toronto Raptors. It eventually led to Carlisle saying that Rondo was a bad fit for the Mavericks and that the team should have never traded for him.

On Tuesday, Rondo apparently shook Carlisle's hand before he checked in the game for the first time in the first quarter. 

All is well, it seems, but that was still weird.