Lockout talks lead to no November games

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Lockout talks lead to no November games

After all of the optimism surrounding the past two days of NBA lockout negotiations, Friday's talks in New York ended--somewhat briefly, compared to Wednesday's marathon session--with a much less positive outlook. League commissioner David Stern subsequently announced that league would cancel an additional two weeks of regular-season games, wiping the November schedule clean, an anticipated measure.

"Our games are cancelled through," said a grim-looking Stern, in contrast to his jovial demeanor after Wednesday's session. "The end of the month of November."

"It's not practical, possible or prudent," he continued. "There will not be a full NBA season."

No further bargaining sessions are scheduled for this weekend--Lakers guard Derek Fisher, the players' association president, told NBA.com he was flying back to Los Angeles--or otherwise. Friday's breakdown occurred because of the continued impasse over the division of basketball-related income--and the animus between the two sides apparently returned.

Union executive director Billy Hunter claimed Stern was "snookering" the media when the commissioner confirmed he was prepared to make a major economic move Friday.

"What he was trying to do was position himself on those other system issues (such as the luxury tax and mid-level exception) so he could get his number on BRI," said Hunter. "It appears that more we give on the system, we may be painting ourselves into a corner."

"They got to the place again where it was, '50-50, take it or leave it,'" he continued. "Today, we're leaving it, like we left it last week.

"Derek and I may it clear that we could not sell a 50-50 deal to our membership, not with the system."

Added Fisher: "We've dropped our BRI percentage from 57 percent to 52.5.

"Right now, it's still not enough for them to feel that this deal should be closed," continued the veteran guard, who cited "artificial pressure" as a reason to not rush through a deal that would last his constituents 10 more years. "We're still not sure if they're at 50 or they're at 47.

"Today just wasn't the day."

Stern confirmed that no further bargaining sessions are scheduled.

"I'm not going to project future negotiations," he said. "We've had, until this afternoon, several good days of give-and-take."

"We've made some major progress on length of contract," the commissioner continued. "We spent a fair amount of time talking about revenue sharing today.

"We made a fair number of concessions."

The commissioner revealed his take on how the negotiations ended for the day.

"Billy Hunter said he wasn't willing to go a penny below 52 percent," he said. "He closed up his books and walked out of the room."

"We were at 47," Stern added. "Today, our offer was 50."

Predictably, Hunter's view on the situation was very different.

"We did what it was the league said they needed," he said. "Their eyes got bigger and they wanted more and more and more, so finally, we had to shut it down and say, 'it can't be.'"

"Our number was our number," Hunter continued. "We just couldn't bridge the gap."

"I know that we have gotten a deal by this weekend, it was very likely, highly probable that we could have gotten a full season."

Ominously, Stern indicated the league's next offer--when the two sides meet again--will be less favorable.

"We're going to have to recalculate," said Stern.

"We've lost approaching 200 million," he continued. "We'll lose several hundred million dollars more."

"You can assume that our offer will change to reflect the changed economic circumstances."

So, despite progress on significant system issues, such as the mid-level exception and even some movement on the luxury-tax policy, it appears that if not back to square one, the two parties are again at odds, with conflicting opinions on their respective stances. One thing, however, is for certain, as Stern glumly summarized.

"The amount of dollars lost to the owners is extraordinary and the amount of dollars lost to the players is also extraordinary," said the commissioner. "In the short run, the owners will not be able to make it back and I know for a fact, in the short run, the players will not be able to make it back, and probably will never be able to make it back."

Neither will the dozens, even hundreds of people employed by the league and its teams or the people making their livelihoods based on games being played, not to mention the fans currently being deprived of NBA basketball.

Michael Jordan voices concern, donates $2 million to police, African-American groups

Michael Jordan voices concern, donates $2 million to police, African-American groups

Michael Jordan has decided to speak out on the country's growing racial and social unrest.

The NBA legend released a statement Monday voicing his concern about the shootings of African-Americans and the targeting of police officers. In the statement, Jordan announced his donation of $1 million each to two organizations involved in efforts to bring police officers and African-Americans together.

"As a proud American, a father who lost his own dad in a senseless act of violence, and a black man, I have been deeply troubled by the deaths of African-Americans at the hands of law enforcement and angered by the cowardly and hateful targeting and killing of police officers. I grieve with the families who have lost loved ones, as I know their pain all too well."

“I was raised by parents who taught me to love and respect people regardless of their race or background, so I am saddened and frustrated by the divisive rhetoric and racial tensions that seem to be getting worse as of late. I know this country is better than that, and I can no longer stay silent. We need to find solutions that ensure people of color receive fair and equal treatment AND that police officers – who put their lives on the line every day to protect us all – are respected and supported.”

As someone who has been known for — and criticized for — keeping a low profile when it comes to social and political advocacy, this is a big public milestone for Jordan.

You can read Jordan's full statement to The Undefeated here.

Doug McDermott reveals jersey number after giving Dwyane Wade No. 3

Doug McDermott reveals jersey number after giving Dwyane Wade No. 3

Doug McDermott is going to have to change his Twitter handle.

McDermott, via his @dougmcd3 Twitter account, announced on Friday that he's switching from Jersey No. 3 to No. 11 for the Bulls next season.

McDermott, who had worn the No. 3 jersey since his days at Creighton and over the past two seasons in the NBA, unselfishly gave up his number to new Bulls guard and future Hall of Famer Dwyane Wade, who has worn the No. 3 every game throughout his 13-year career.

[SHOP: Get your Doug...Dwyane Wade No. 3 jersey]

As for what Wade had to give up in return? McDermott hasn't revealed his prize.

"It's in the works," McDermott said via K.C. Johnson of the Chicago Tribune.

McDermott becomes the first player to wear the No. 11 jersey on the Bulls since Ronnie Brewer in 2014. 

Other notables to wear No. 11 for Chicago include B.J. Armstrong, Sam Vincent, Lindsey Hunter, Clem Haskins and A.J. Guyton.

Derrick Rose believes he's helped form a 'super team' with Knicks

Derrick Rose believes he's helped form a 'super team' with Knicks

I think somebody needs to explain to Derrick Rose what a "super team" is.

In a recent interview with NBA.com, Rose talked about the expectations with his new team — the New York Knicks — and how "they" are saying the Knicks are a super team.

Here's the full quote responding to the question about expectations:

They’re high. I mean, with these teams right now, they’re saying us and Golden State are the super teams, and they’re trying not to build that many super teams, and Adam Silver came out with the statement and this and that. And the expectations I think of us, we just want to win. Talking to Melo and all the guys who’ve been around. You’ve got Brandon who just signed for one year, he’s got to show why he’s there. I’ve got to show why I’m there. Joakim has to show why he’s there. Everybody’s trying to prove themselves. When you’ve got a group like that, it’s like, alright, I know everybody wants to do that, but we’re going to break this down as simple as possible, and try to win every game. I think winning takes care of every category, as far as being an athlete. You look at endorsements, being on the floor, almost everything — I think winning takes care of all that. And if you’re in the league, winning takes care of all the mistakes, or if you have any problems on teams.

So Rose thinks the Knicks — a team that finished 13th in the East and 12 games out of the final playoff spot last season — are a super team now? 

And who is "they"? It's hard to imagine even the most optimistic Knicks fan sitting on a barstool declaring this squad a "super team."

[SHOP: Gear up, Bulls fans]

From that team that went 32-50 last season, the Knicks added Rose, Joakim Noah, Courtney Lee, Brandon Jennings and Justin Holliday.

Sure, that looks like it could be a very solid roster with Carmelo Anthony and Kristaps Porzingis also in the fold and if Rose and Noah show flashes of their former selves, the Knicks may be a force to be reckoned with.

But given the Knicks didn't actually sign Dwyane Wade, not sure how anybody could call that a "super team."

Guess it wouldn't be a basketball offseason without D-Rose putting his foot in his mouth, eh?