Rose day-to-day with back spasms


Rose day-to-day with back spasms

NEWARK, N.J. After being seen doing extra stretching with the Bulls training staff during the teams win in Milwaukee Saturday -- something also witnessed earlier in the road trip, during the Bulls in Washington last Monday -- Derrick Roses status was a topic of conversation entering Mondays game against the Nets.

However, both Bulls head coach Tom Thibodeau and Rose downplayed the significance of his back pain before the game and Rose started the contest.

While he committed two fouls early in the game and had to take a seat, all seemed fine. That is, until the 2:54 mark of the second quarter, when Rose left the game, never to return after being diagnosed with lower back spasms.

Right now, I feel all right. Just back spasms, nothing to worry about. Tuesday we have a day off, get treatment, get a massage and hopefully Ill be playing next game, Rose said afterwards. It was tight the whole game. Its just something where Ive got to get a massage and stretched the right way, and hopefully itll be gone.

I cant remember when it happened. I was tight a couple of games ago, but tonight was pretty tough and intense, he continued. For right now, Ill be playing next game. Its nothing like Im going to be sitting out. I always want to think positive, just try to keep things going our way.

Thibodeau was also cautiously optimistic.

Just some back stiffness, day-to-day, so well see how he is Tuesday, said the coach. Bulls trainer Fred Tedeschi thought he landed on one of his layups, but hes had some stiffness now.

Youre always concerned, certainly with him, but no more than every other player, too. Health is a big concern. Hes done a great job of taking care of himself this year, doing a lot of extra conditioning, lifting, rehab, massage, rest, so were hopeful that this is a very short-term thing.

Rose believes the symptoms started probably even before the Wizards game, but while he cant pinpoint when they occurred, he explained what he thinks the cause is.

Its pretty tight. Im a guy thats not flexible, so if one thing fails on meespecially when it has something to do with my legs; tendonitis or whateverit tends to use the other parts of your body a little bit more and these last couple of days, its been my back, he said.

I think Thibs has been doing a great job of managing us, making sure were getting rest. We havent been practicing that much and when we do practice, we dont move around as much. He tells us its more like a mental practice, where he challenges us mentally in knowing what we have to do when we go into every game we play.

Bulls announce signing of shooting guard R.J. Hunter

Bulls announce signing of shooting guard R.J. Hunter

Minutes before they opened their regular season Thursday against the Celtics, the Bulls announced the signing of shooting guard R.J. Hunter.

Hunter was a first-round pick of the Celtics in 2015 but was waived this preseason. In his lone year with the Celtics he appeared in 38 games. He struggled from the field, shooting just 36.7 percent from the field and 30.2 percent from deep. He ultimately lost out on a roster spot this preseason in a crowded Celtics backcourt.

"Not surprised he got picked up," Celtics head coach Brad Stevens said. "We said the other day, we had more than 15 NBA players (in training camp) and so it was just a matter of time who he was going to get picked up by. It was good that he did."

Fred Hoiberg was asked at Thursday morning's shootaround about the possibility of adding a player like Hunter. And while he couldn't specifically mention Hunter - as the deal was not official - he did discuss the continued need for outside shooting.

"It’s something that obviously we feel that we’ve got some shooting with this team but you can never have enough, so I’ll say that," Hoiberg said. It’s something where if we can get our playmakers in the paint to be able to spray it out to guys that can spread the floor, that’s obviously something that can help our team.

"So again we feel good about where we are with our playmakers and if we can get some guys to knock down shots I think we have a chance to have an effective year."

Hunter was the darling of the 2015 NCAA Tournament playing for his father at Georgia State. Hunter hit a game-winning 3-pointer against Baylor to propel the 14th-seeded Panthers to an opening-round win.

Hunter was a two-time Sun Belt Player of the Year, averaging 19.7 points per game as a junior.

Hunter's first chance to suit up with the Bulls will be Saturday when they host the Indiana Pacers.

Dwyane Wade ready to balance minutes, substitution patterns with Bulls

Dwyane Wade ready to balance minutes, substitution patterns with Bulls

Dwyane Wade’s minutes per game have decreased in each of the last four seasons, and he’s missed a combined 102 since the start of the 2011-12 season. Those facts are hardly surprising for a 14-year veteran who will turn 35 before this year’s All-Star break, and one who has dealt with knee injuries much of his career and has logged nearly 37,000 minutes between the regular season and postseason.

Wade still has plenty left in the tank, as witnessed by his impressive performance in last year’s postseason and the fact that he played in 74 regular-season games, the most since 2010 when LeBron James and Chris Bosh first joined him in Miami. The Bulls showed this summer they believe Wade has something to offer when they gave him a two-year, $47.5 million deal to return home.

Wade averaged 22.3 minutes per game in six preseason games, playing between 24 and 27 minutes in the five games after he logged 12 minutes in the preseason opener. He also sat the second of a back-to-back in Milwaukee. It’ll be up to Wade, head coach Fred Hoiberg and the coaching staff to come up with a plan to keep Wade as fresh as possible over the course of the next five-plus months while also allowing putting the Bulls in the best position to win each night.

“(Hoiberg) hasn’t said, ‘You’re going to play 30 minutes exactly,’” Wade said at Thursday’s shootaround. “A lot of it is just, looking at preseason, I think I’m going to be around 30-32 minutes just by the substitution patterns that (Hoiberg) is thinking about for me. I’m good with it. We haven’t had a (direct) conversation, but we’re both cool with it.”

Wade said that those substitution patterns will be more important than the total number of minutes he logs each night. He joked that in a perfect world the Bulls would have a big enough lead where he could sit the entire fourth quarter. How the game plays out will dictate the number of minutes Wade plays, but both he and Hoiberg will do their best to keep Wade fresh by timing when he subs out and returns to the game over a 48-minute span.

“I’m not a kind of guy that wants to stay out for 10-12 minutes on the clock because I’m gonna get a little stiff. I’m also not a kind of guy that wants to go for 12 minutes straight, so I think (Hoiberg) is learning me, and we stay in constant communication about when I’ve got a little break and I’m ready to go again.

“I don’t need to be out there the whole quarter neither. Take me out when you need to, I’ll get a break and I’m ready to go again. So it’s all about figuring it out and we’re doing a good job of it.”

[SHOP: Gear up, Bulls fans!]

When the Heat got off to a 15-9 start last season Wade played fewer than 30 minutes in 11 of the 23 games he appeared in, and five of the first eight contests to begin the year. So while he may take some time to get his legs underneath him, Hoiberg noted that on multiple occasions in the preseason Wade asked to return to the game in the second half to build up a rhythm for the regular season.

“A lot of it will depend on how he’s feeling. We have an idea about where we want him with his minutes, we’ve talked about that with him,” Hoiberg said. “But if he’s feeling great, maybe one game he’s not feeling so good, we’ll go away from it. But we’ve got an idea of where we want him with his minutes and we’ll try to stick to it.”

Wade said he doesn’t have a particular goal in mind for the number of games he’d like to play this season. But after 13 years in the league he has found the best way for him to attack the game each night while also keeping an eye toward the bigger picture, when the Bulls will need him down the stretch in April and potentially into the postseason.

“I want to take advantage of every moment and opportunity as I can and help get my team a chance to win,” he said. “So it’s my job to try to take care of my body away from the game of basketball, and then when I’m on the court I pray and knock on wood that I don’t get injured and can stay out there.”