Thibodeau talks possible trade targets for Bulls

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Thibodeau talks possible trade targets for Bulls

MILWAUKEE - Prior to Wednesdays thrilling win over the Bucks, Tom Thibodeau was asked about one particular player and whether the Bulls would make a move to acquire him at the March 15th trade deadline.

Im not sure yet, he said. Were going to look at a lot of different options.

Vague, as expected. But who was Thibodeau talking about? Dwight Howard, who visits the United Center for Thursdays tilt against the Magic? For those panicking about Rip Hamiltons health status, maybe a shooting guard, such as Golden States Monta Ellis?

No and no. Thibodeau was talking about Mike James.

Its likely, unless another team snatches him up first, that the Bulls re-acquire the 36-year-old point guard later this month, along with a bargain-priced veteran backup big man. Something more significant is unlikely to occur.

When you study personnel, you also study the make-up of the players and can they fit in. Our managements going to study whats available and as I mentioned before, if we dont do anything, we feel very good about the people that we have, he said. Thibodeau and the Bulls front office talk every day. Their job is to study the league, field calls and often times, if you have a good team, you have good players, people want them, they call. That doesnt mean were going to do anything. We listen and if we think it can make the team better, well consider it. If not, were more than happy with the roster that we have. We feel very good about that.

That doesnt mean players on other teams, particularly title-starved veterans, dont covet an opportunity to play for the Bulls. Take Bucks swingman Stephen Jackson, a name bandied around in the past as a potential Bulls target.

At the present time, Jackson is wasting away on Milwaukees bench, the result of an ongoing feud with Bucks head coach Scott Skiles, ironically a former Bulls coach. Whether youre of the opinion that Jackson is a career malcontent or, as future Hall of Famer Tim Duncan would tell you the pair won a championship together in San Antonio hes one of the best teammates one could have, his talent is undeniable.

Who wouldnt want to play with Derrick Rose? Right up the street; it would be a great fit for me. I dont think anybody in the league would say they wouldnt want to do that, but me, at the end of the day, I just want to play. Ive been a competitor my whole career, Ive won everywhere Ive went, so at this point, I just want to get back on the court and do what I do best, wherever that is, Jackson told CSNChicago.com Wednesday morning. Im just here, working out every day, just waiting for my opportunity, so I can be ready, but thats always my goal, to win a championship and I know being on a team like that, it wouldnt be that hard.

Its been tough with me because Ive been in a situation where I havent been playing, a situation that doesnt fit me and the good thing about it is hopefully something happens in the next couple of weeks where I can get somewhere where I can play. At the end of the day, Im here supporting the team right now and just trying to stay professional until something changes, continued the versatile veteran. Ive heard a lot, but its kind of hard because teams dont really say too much to me, especially this organization, but Im just keeping my fingers crossed, just continuing to keep my body ready for when its time.

When asked about Jacksons situation, Thibodeau refused to take the bait, stating, Hes a talented player, but I have enough to worry about with our team.

Now, before anyone gets the wrong idea, theres no evidence at least not from this writer that the Bulls are currently interested in Jackson. The organization has confidence in Hamilton returning from his latest injury, a fluke occurrence, and believe hes an excellent fit on and off the court, as well as possessing a postseason pedigree that can help them get over the hump, particularly because of his numerous playoff battles with Miami shooting-guard counterpart Dwyane Wade.

Injuries are part of the game. You have no control over that. You look at Milwaukee: center Andrew Bogut being out is significant. I think were fortunate, where we have a lot of depth. Ronnie had a great training camp and when we went into training camp, we didnt even know wed have Rip, said Thibodeau. Ronnies done a great job, both starting and coming off the bench. We have Kyle, Lu, Jimmy. We can play C.J., go small. Theres a lot of things that we can do. You deal with the things that happen as they come along and you have to respond to every challenge.

It comes down to, I think, in the end, the teams that are playing the best and are the healthiest, Thibodeau concluded. Whatever the circumstances are, you can always fit somebody in. They may not have a full understanding of everything, but you can design specific packages for those guys, when theyre in the game, and thats not uncommon. You deal with that throughout the course of the season, whether you bring in a guy for a 10-day contract or theres a trade made."

Since Thibodeau isnt a head coach with total control over personnel moves, he wisely left the door open for a transaction to happen, but the truth of it is, the current Bulls roster is probably the one hell finish the season coaching, give or take a few low-impact moves for depth purposes.

Additionally, while the team has won without Hamilton in the lineup, there wasnt a better available fit on the market when the Bulls acquired him in December - his perpetual-motion game allows the ball to remain in Derrick Rose's hands, yet he's an underrated playmaker, as well as defender, and gives the team the perimeter-shooting presence they so desired last season - so at least this season, its time to either stay on the ride and see where the team takes it or jump off the bandwagon right now.

Making adjustments nothing new for new Bulls star Dwyane Wade

Making adjustments nothing new for new Bulls star Dwyane Wade

Dwyane Wade has always had eclectic tastes in threads, but considering the career adjustments he’s had to make, the 34-year old might decide to be a tailor when he hangs up his Way of Wade kicks.

Going from point guard to shooting guard after his rookie year? No problem.

Assuaging the sensitive ego of Shaquille O’Neal after O’Neal’s rocky breakup with Kobe Bryant? Child’s play.

Allowing LeBron James to take over his team and his city after two seasons where he averaged 28 points, seven assists, five rebounds and two steals? Sure, since it meant more rings.

Adjusting to his knees robbing him of his transcendent explosiveness? Excuse him while he walks to meet the media with both knees wrapped in ice — while wearing a smile.

Being introduced first, second or last? Doesn’t matter, as long as Tommy Edwards says “from Chicago” as a nod to Wade’s hometown roots.

So in making the biggest geographical change to date, moving back to Chicago after 13 years in Miami, Wade is prepared to shift again — even if it means being a 3-point shooter, even if it means playing different roles to suit the changing needs of this roster.

“My game translates anywhere,” Wade said after Wednesday’s morning practice, “I’ve played with so many different players before. I’m not worried about that. It’s me trying to understand offense, understand what we’re trying to do. Get to know my teammates. But I know where my sweet spot is, when to get aggressive, etc. One thing I’m trying to get used to is that 3-point shot is going to be open a little bit more for me, and coach is telling me to shoot it. That’s a little new era for me.”

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Bulls fans probably remember Wade hitting his share of devastating 3-pointers against them over the years, even though his 386 career makes only account for .05 percent of his made field goals.

There was the four-point play in Game 5 of the 2011 Eastern Conference Finals at the United Center when Wade’s Heat stormed back late to clinch a trip to The Finals. Very few can forget the heartbreaking, buzzer-beating running triple after a blindside steal from John Salmons in the 2008-09 season, so it’s not that he lacks the ability.

The Charlotte Hornets and Toronto Raptors found that out last spring when he hit 12 in 14 playoff games for the Heat.

“In the playoffs they take things away, right,” Wade said. “In the regular season, you play so many games teams sometimes don’t get a long time to prepare for you, so they may try and take one thing away.”

The logic was followed by a little hubris, earned considering he’s risen to such heights without having to rely on it.

“For me a lot of people have talked about me not shooting threes, but no one has been able to take away what I wanted to do. So why would I do something else?” Wade queried. “But then when you take it away I have the ability to knock it down. I’m not Doug McDermott. I’m not Niko (Mirotic). But I’m comfortable with the shot, and I’m going to shoot it. I know it’s going to be there, so I have a better chance of knocking it down. Coach has been on me about it.”

Wade will have to take the shot to keep defenses from sagging too far down on Jimmy Butler drives, and the hope is Butler goes back to shooting 38 percent from the long line as he did in 2014-15 as opposed to the 31 percent he shot last season.

For things to work in a potentially awkward situation, Wade has to be willing to step a little outside himself and seems prepared to.

“Normally I had to be the guy that would put it on the floor, but more so than that just pick my spots,” Wade said. “Understand when to be aggressive, but I’m a play-maker as well. I’m always looking to make plays for my guys.’’

Wade understands Fred Hoiberg’s offense is more equal opportunity than isolation-based but knows the instances will come when he must be the primary scorer — particularly late when he’s one of the league’s premier fourth-quarter scorers.

“Last year I averaged 19, the other 21.5. I can score, that's fine with me,” Wade said. “I'm willing to do whatever it takes. Scoring is one of those things that comes natural. It just depends on how high field-goal percentage I shoot. I'm not concerned about that. If coach wants me to score, then thank you.”

New tone set in Bulls training camp marked by role adjustments

New tone set in Bulls training camp marked by role adjustments

With eight new players and likely three new starters for the Bulls, an adjustment period of roles has started to take place in the opening days of camp.

Shot creators turn into shot makers.

Full-time ball handlers revert back to being part-time dominators.

First-time leaders are supplemented by experienced leaders who bring an instant credibility and speak with a bluntness that wasn’t as present last year—even from the coach.

A new tone of sorts was set when Dwyane Wade didn’t give the stock “nobody cares what happened last year” spiel after being asked if he wondered about what went wrong on the floor and off with the Bulls.

“You ask the guys that were here last year, how rotten it was,” Wade said. “You want to hear from their perspective, whatever it was last year from the standpoint of losing. You don't do that. I come from a different place and a different culture. Things are done differently different places. So I sat down and listened to guys.

“But the thing is, some of the things they talked about I know are not going to take place. Not while I'm here, not while (Rajon) Rondo's here, not while Jimmy (Butler) continues to grow as a leader.”

It adds light to some of the thoughts that Butler expressed after Tuesday’s first practice, and what anyone with a set of eyes could see last season when the Bulls looked like a fractured group that didn’t enjoy playing with each other anymore.

There wasn’t outright disdain, but some of the damaged relationships were never repaired as the season went on. Putting that into an alphabet soup with losing, bad habits and injuries and it spelled out “something’s gotta give.”

“You definitely gotta like each other. If you don’t, and you can say this doesn’t happen, but I feel like if you don’t like a guy you’re not going to pass him the ball,” said Butler, who had some rocky moments last season as a leader. “I think there’s a lot of liking on this team. Like I said, everybody wants everybody to be successful. Do we like each other too much? I hope so.”

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Refreshing honesty is a change at the Advocate Center, with Wade and Rondo being the adults in the room. The two have the latitude from Bulls coach Fred Hoiberg to stop practice to get on guys, and they did so Tuesday.

“You just want to cut down all the chatter; it’s early,” Rondo said. “Only a couple of guys should be talking in practice. As far as disrupting when they do stop practice, coach has the voice then assistant coach has the voice and then the other players.”

It’s not a surprise given Hoiberg won’t be one change his ways overnight, and having a player-run team are often the most successful, assuming everyone is on the same page.

It sort of speaks to Bulls vice president John Paxson’s statement on media day about the Bulls’ rebuilding their culture from the ground level.

“You talk about last year, but at the same time, last year doesn't matter,” Wade said. “We have a different core, and I think our culture is fairly different. We have guys now, Rondo's won a championship, I've won championships, we demand respect on the court. But we've got a lot of young guys as well, so they'll listen.”

Wade and Rondo have both said the Bulls are Butler’s team, but it doesn’t mean they’ll be wallflowers if they see things they don’t like. Wade has been a vocal leader in some form for the last decade and Rondo has rarely, if ever, held his tongue.

Rondo, along with being a primary facilitator for Butler to make scoring easier, imparted some wisdom to help Butler in his ever-evolving role as a leader.

“Not doing it with my mouth but with my actions, being consistent; I told Jimmy a leader can’t pick and choose when he wants to lead,” Rondo said. “He has to come out every day, every practice; we’re having two a days. If you are down, need something to get your head right, you have to bring it every day, every day.”

Hoiberg said there has to be a mutual respect amongst the team, which can lead to chemistry and camaraderie.

“It takes a lot of those moments when we all make mistakes and the coach is on us, that's when we come together,” Wade said. “In the locker room, when we're in there talking about anything, talking about whatever. it takes a lot of being on the road, traveling together. You're on a road trip, you go out dinner together. It's going to take a lot of moments to get the chemistry that we need.”