Wednesday meeting raises NBA lockout hopes

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Wednesday meeting raises NBA lockout hopes

We've been down this road before. Sure, the situation is different every time -- the players are willing to take an equal split of basketball-related income, NBA commissioner David Stern has the power to tweak the owners' proposal in order to make a deal. According to Yahoo!, a meeting, now in progress, was agreed to before Wednesday afternoon's deadline for the union to take the current offer.

Compared to recent events in sports, like the death of boxing legend Joe Frazier, the awful Penn State scandal, Stevie Williams' racist remarks about Tiger Woods and the aftermath of the epic LSU-Alabama clash (or for the musically-inclined, the passing of Heavy D), the latest developments in the saga of the NBA lockout don't amount to much. But in this sensationalized society, even the comments of lawyers make headlines, as witnessed when union attorney Jeffrey Kessler brought race into his characterization of Stern -- the commissioner defended himself, unlike he did when Bryant Gumbel hurled similar words his way -- before apologizing.

Indeed, the subplots of this drama have alternately enhanced and subtracted from the issues. Being that negotiations take place in New York, at times this feels like the "Gangs of New York," with all of the different factions -- players for union decertification, the so-called NBA middle-class wanting to take the deal, pro-Derek Fisher players, international players urging the players' association to make an agreement, hard-line stars and even powerful agents working behind the scenes to influence union strategy; the two main groups for owners seem to be small-market teams and major markets, or is it "hawks" and "doves," or Michael Jordan and Paul Allen vs. Micky Arison? -- pushing their agendas.

Regardless of all the distractions present, the small groups on both sides in the room Wednesday (doesn't it seem as if small groups have been more effective throughout this process) seemingly have some clarity going into these discussions, even after the players' association Tuesday rejected the deal on the table. The union has continuously conceded on various points of contention, most obviously the revenue split, and now what remains are must-have -- at least for the players -- system issues that won't restrict player movement, such as teams that pay the luxury tax not being prevented from making sign-and-trades or being otherwise discouraged from going over the tax threshold, like not receiving a full mid-level exception.

With so many other points of contention now agreed upon, surely the two parties can swallow their pride and instead of the next announcement being that games are canceled through Christmas, a less frustrating, more positive message will be heard, jamming Twitter, leading local and national news broadcasts and allowing players, employees, fans and media alike to rejoice? It's possible, but even as leaks from the discussions provide third-party insights of any progress, don't get your hopes up just yet.

Michael Jordan voices concern, donates $2 million to police, African-American groups

Michael Jordan voices concern, donates $2 million to police, African-American groups

Michael Jordan has decided to speak out on the country's growing racial and social unrest.

The NBA legend released a statement Monday voicing his concern about the shootings of African-Americans and the targeting of police officers. In the statement, Jordan announced his donation of $1 million each to two organizations involved in efforts to bring police officers and African-Americans together.

"As a proud American, a father who lost his own dad in a senseless act of violence, and a black man, I have been deeply troubled by the deaths of African-Americans at the hands of law enforcement and angered by the cowardly and hateful targeting and killing of police officers. I grieve with the families who have lost loved ones, as I know their pain all too well."

“I was raised by parents who taught me to love and respect people regardless of their race or background, so I am saddened and frustrated by the divisive rhetoric and racial tensions that seem to be getting worse as of late. I know this country is better than that, and I can no longer stay silent. We need to find solutions that ensure people of color receive fair and equal treatment AND that police officers – who put their lives on the line every day to protect us all – are respected and supported.”

As someone who has been known for — and criticized for — keeping a low profile when it comes to social and political advocacy, this is a big public milestone for Jordan.

You can read Jordan's full statement to The Undefeated here.

Doug McDermott reveals jersey number after giving Dwyane Wade No. 3

Doug McDermott reveals jersey number after giving Dwyane Wade No. 3

Doug McDermott is going to have to change his Twitter handle.

McDermott, via his @dougmcd3 Twitter account, announced on Friday that he's switching from Jersey No. 3 to No. 11 for the Bulls next season.

McDermott, who had worn the No. 3 jersey since his days at Creighton and over the past two seasons in the NBA, unselfishly gave up his number to new Bulls guard and future Hall of Famer Dwyane Wade, who has worn the No. 3 every game throughout his 13-year career.

[SHOP: Get your Doug...Dwyane Wade No. 3 jersey]

As for what Wade had to give up in return? McDermott hasn't revealed his prize.

"It's in the works," McDermott said via K.C. Johnson of the Chicago Tribune.

McDermott becomes the first player to wear the No. 11 jersey on the Bulls since Ronnie Brewer in 2014. 

Other notables to wear No. 11 for Chicago include B.J. Armstrong, Sam Vincent, Lindsey Hunter, Clem Haskins and A.J. Guyton.

Derrick Rose believes he's helped form a 'super team' with Knicks

Derrick Rose believes he's helped form a 'super team' with Knicks

I think somebody needs to explain to Derrick Rose what a "super team" is.

In a recent interview with NBA.com, Rose talked about the expectations with his new team — the New York Knicks — and how "they" are saying the Knicks are a super team.

Here's the full quote responding to the question about expectations:

They’re high. I mean, with these teams right now, they’re saying us and Golden State are the super teams, and they’re trying not to build that many super teams, and Adam Silver came out with the statement and this and that. And the expectations I think of us, we just want to win. Talking to Melo and all the guys who’ve been around. You’ve got Brandon who just signed for one year, he’s got to show why he’s there. I’ve got to show why I’m there. Joakim has to show why he’s there. Everybody’s trying to prove themselves. When you’ve got a group like that, it’s like, alright, I know everybody wants to do that, but we’re going to break this down as simple as possible, and try to win every game. I think winning takes care of every category, as far as being an athlete. You look at endorsements, being on the floor, almost everything — I think winning takes care of all that. And if you’re in the league, winning takes care of all the mistakes, or if you have any problems on teams.

So Rose thinks the Knicks — a team that finished 13th in the East and 12 games out of the final playoff spot last season — are a super team now? 

And who is "they"? It's hard to imagine even the most optimistic Knicks fan sitting on a barstool declaring this squad a "super team."

[SHOP: Gear up, Bulls fans]

From that team that went 32-50 last season, the Knicks added Rose, Joakim Noah, Courtney Lee, Brandon Jennings and Justin Holliday.

Sure, that looks like it could be a very solid roster with Carmelo Anthony and Kristaps Porzingis also in the fold and if Rose and Noah show flashes of their former selves, the Knicks may be a force to be reckoned with.

But given the Knicks didn't actually sign Dwyane Wade, not sure how anybody could call that a "super team."

Guess it wouldn't be a basketball offseason without D-Rose putting his foot in his mouth, eh?