Beliveau hoping to make Cubs take notice


Beliveau hoping to make Cubs take notice

MESA, Ariz. Jeff Beliveau remembers exactly where he was when Dave Roberts stole second base against Mariano Rivera and the New York Yankees.

Beliveau, who grew up in Rhode Island, had traveled to Arizona with his parents for a showcase tournament for high school prospects. They watched Game 4 of the 2004 American League Championship Series at Flemings steakhouse in Scottsdale.

That ninth inning became an iconic moment to so many people from New England. The Boston Red Sox began to erase a 3-0 series deficit and take down the Evil Empire. A self-proclaimed band of idiots reversed the curse and gave Red Sox fans their first World Series title in 86 years.

That meant a lot to me and my family, Beliveau said Monday. Im pretty excited about whats going to happen the next few years.

Fast forward to last months Cubs Convention, where a fan asked Theo Epstein to name one under-the-radar prospect in the system who could make an impact. The new president of baseball operations identified Beliveau. The 25-year-old left-handed reliever will be given an opportunity to win a spot in the Cubs bullpen.

Beliveau has gone from being an 18th-round draft pick out of Florida Atlantic University in 2008 to the organizations minor league pitcher of the year in 2011. He went 6-1 with a 1.89 ERA at Double-A Tennessee, finishing with 69 strikeouts against 13 walks in 57 innings, numbers that would make Epstein take notice.

Cubs manager Dale Sveum has mentioned how Beliveaus disappearing fastball should play at the next level. Beliveau has tried to model himself after retired closer Billy Wagner, with a short-arm delivery thats hard to pick up out of the left hand.

Beliveau was playing for Team USA last fall while the Epstein compensation negotiations dragged out. He thought about how it would be cool to meet the guy who helped build that forever Red Sox team.

Near the start of his first big-league camp, Beliveau met with Epstein, Sveum, general manager Jed Hoyer and pitching coach Chris Bosio in the managers office. Each player had a meeting to go over expectations. The message was loud and clear.

They told me: Dont come here just for the experience. You have a chance to make the team. You had a great year last year keep it going.

Booze ban?

After an epic collapse last September generated sensational stories about the fried chicken and beer culture around the Red Sox, new manager Bobby Valentine banned alcohol in the clubhouse.

Cubs players have been spotted drinking the occasional beer after games in the clubhouse its not widespread and the team doesnt serve alcohol on charter flights headed back to Chicago at the end of road trips. Sveum was asked Monday if policies have been discussed for 2012.

No, we havent talked about anything like that, Sveum said. Thats up to the front office and myself and I dont know, to tell you the truth, the policies that have been here before. So I dont really have much comment on that right now.


Rodrigo Lopez is scheduled to start Sundays Cactus League opener vs. the Oakland As, followed by Ryan Dempster (Monday vs. As) and Matt Garza (Tuesday vs. the Colorado Rockies). Sveum said this isnt an indication of who will start Opening Day, a decision that should be announced by the middle of camp. Starlin Castros right arm was said to be fine after being hit by a Kerry Wood fastball during live batting practice on Monday at Fitch Park. Paul Maholm (flu) was sent home after throwing on Monday before his bunting tournament matchup against Lopez while Geovany Soto (groin) continues to be limited during workouts. Wood lost to Sveum in a first-round match in the bunting tournament. Also advancing were Soto, Dempster, Jeff Baker, Marlon Byrd, David DeJesus and Carlos Marmol.

Briefly: What to know about how Trevor Bauer matches up against the Cubs

Briefly: What to know about how Trevor Bauer matches up against the Cubs

CLEVELAND — Trevor Bauer is confident his pinky finger won’t burst open in Game 2 of the World Series, as it did in his abbreviated start in the American League Championship Series after he sliced it while repairing his drone. 

If that bizarre storyline is put to bed Wednesday night in the cold, damp conditions at Progressive Field, then what can the Cubs expect from the eccentric 25-year-old right-hander?

Bauer appeared in 35 games for the Cleveland Indians in 2016, starting 28 and throwing 190 innings with a 4.26 ERA and 3.99 FIP. But those numbers are skewed a bit: Bauer had a 3.20 ERA in 101 innings in the first half of the season with 35 walks, 91 strikeouts and eight home runs allowed. In 89 innings in the second half of 2016, covering 15 starts, Bauer had a 5.36 ERA with the same amount of walks (35) and more home runs allowed (12). 

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Bauer is prone to wildness, having issued three or more walks in nine of his appearances this year, including a five-walk, eight-run start against Minnesota Aug. 3. Still, Bauer averaged 6 1/3 innings per start in the regular season, averaging just under four pitches per batter faced. 

The biggest key for the Cubs’ patient lineup, though, may not be forcing his pitch count up — it’ll be getting to him early, given Terry Francona’s aggressive bullpen management means they may not face him a third time through the order. That’s where Bauer’s been the most vulnerable, allowing a .283/.338/.481 slash line (an .820 OPS) compared to a .671 OPS the first time through and a .675 OPS the second time through. Even if Andrew Miller, who threw 46 pitches on Tuesday, isn’t available, it’d be a surprise to see Bauer stay in beyond 80 or so pitches, assuming his finger holds up. 

“I don't think that finger's going to be the reason he wins or loses,” Francona said, though he added he thought that before Bauer’s ALCS Game 3 start, too. 

In Game 1, Jon Lester doesn't quite live up to his World Series reputation: 'We got a long ways to go'

In Game 1, Jon Lester doesn't quite live up to his World Series reputation: 'We got a long ways to go'

CLEVELAND – While the Cubs came into this World Series as the heavy favorites, the team with the global following and baseball’s best roster on paper, Jon Lester understood the challenge ahead. The Cleveland Indians would counter with their own Game 1 ace, a dynamic reliever changing the way we think about bullpens and a future Hall of Fame manager.

That’s how it played out in a 6-0 game that felt a lot closer, Corey Kluber pitching like a Cy Young Award winner, Andrew Miller handling the seventh and eighth innings and Terry Francona improving his record to 9-0 in World Series games.     

Welcome to “Believeland,” where the Fourth Street bars on Tuesday were buzzing more than seven hours before first pitch. That night, LeBron James and the Cavaliers would get their championship rings and watch the banner-raising ceremony at Quicken Loans Arena, just up the street from Progressive Field.

By the first inning – when pitching coach Chris Bosio had to walk out to the mound to talk to Lester – the red video ribbons lining the stadium said: “CLEVELAND AGAINST THE WORLD.” With the bases loaded, Lester had just drilled Brandon Guyer with a pitch, forcing in a second run, a sequence set in motion by walks to Mike Napoli and Carlos Santana and Jose Ramirez’s soft infield single up the third-base line.

It didn’t matter that Lester would eventually settle down and pretty much control this Cleveland lineup. (Except for that rocket Roberto Perez launched off the left-field railing for a solo homer and a 3-0 lead in the fourth inning.) Or that the Indians didn’t run all over the bases, with Francisco Lindor going 1-for-2 in stolen bases. (“Whatever, it’s happened all year," Lester said.)

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This is Cleveland’s blueprint for October, maybe its only chance to win its first World Series since 1948.

“It’s always important (to get a lead), no matter what time of year it is,” Lester said. “It makes a manager’s job a lot easier. It makes your job a lot easier. When you give a guy like Kluber – who’s locked in from pitch one – two runs in the first, it makes his job a lot easier. I know the feeling on the other side. You’re just able to attack differently.

“With the bullpens and all that stuff that they’re setting up nowadays, all you got to do is get through six.”

Lester kept it a 3-0 game, but didn’t finish the sixth inning, a rare October night where he didn’t seem to be automatic. Until Tuesday night, he had gone 3-0 in three World Series starts, allowing only one earned run in 21 innings.

Lester won his two World Series rings with the Boston Red Sox, overlapping with Francona and Miller at different points. This is why the Cubs gave Lester a $155 million contract, to set the tone on the mound and within the clubhouse.

Near the end of a 103-win regular season – and even after winning the franchise’s first pennant in 71 years – Lester has offered colorful versions of: We haven’t done anything yet.

But Lester – the National League Championship Series co-MVP after putting up a 1.38 ERA against the Los Angeles Dodgers and watching the Cubs win both of those starts – also doesn’t do overreactions to losses.

“We got a long ways to go,” Lester said. “If we win tomorrow, we’re right back in it. Just like LA – everybody counted us out after Game 3. They said we were the worst best team in baseball. We’re here. We’re not giving up.

“I know my guys. I know my team. And I know that nobody in this clubhouse is giving anything up.”