The critics dont bother Aramis Ramirez

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The critics dont bother Aramis Ramirez

PHOENIX Aramis Ramirez doesnt know how he will be received when he steps into the box at Wrigley Field on April 9 wearing a Milwaukee Brewers uniform. He doesnt really care either.

I have no clue, Ramirez said Saturday. Thats part of baseball. Ive been booed before when I left Pittsburgh. Its been nine years and every time I go back I still get booed. I dont know how theyre going to take it. I dont really worry about it. I cant control that stuff.

Ramirez never showed much emotion, which is why it was so surprising that he nearly fought Carlos Silva the last time the Cubs drove over to Maryvale Baseball Park. It was a bad image to project, a team unraveling after the first inning of the fourth game in spring training.

You certainly cant draw a direct line to Mike Quade and Jim Hendry getting fired.

But in the 12 months since that dugout altercation, you can look back and think the cracks were beginning to show for a first-year manager and the long-time general manager, who was close with Ramirez. The mix wasnt quite right for a team that would finish in fifth place again.

New president Theo Epstein made it clear to Ramirez agent last fall that the Cubs planned to go young and werent interested in a 16 million mutual option for 2012, or renegotiating a new deal. So Ramirez got his money from the Brewers, a three-year 36 million insurance policy against losing Prince Fielder.

In the past, Ramirez has said that you cant rebuild in big market, that you need a name product to fill 40,000 seats every game. How long will Cubs fans really stay patient with Epstein?

Thats a good question, Ramirez said. Im not a fan. Im a player. I dont know. Its going to take time, hopefully sooner than later. Hes been successful before in Boston. Im sure hes got a good plan. Hes got something working right now.

For Ramirez, it was always just business. He was their third baseman for eight consecutive Opening Days beginning in 2004; the Cubs had seven different ones in the eight years before that. Ian Stewart will be there April 5.

How come Ramirez never really connected with the fans the way, say, Tony Campana did as a rookie extra outfielder last season?

Because Im slow, man, they like the fast guys, Ramirez said with a smile. No, I dont know. I cant really point at anything. I just tried to do my job, and I think for the most part I did it. Thats all you can ask from a player. I cant really answer that question.

Ramirez hit 239 homers for the Cubs which ranks sixth all-time in franchise history and drove in more than 800 runs during his time on the North Side. He played in the Bartman game in 2003 and was a force on teams that won back-to-back division titles in 2007 and 2008.

The Ramirez critics questioned his hustle, desire and defense. The loudest may have been television analyst Bob Brenly, who managed the Arizona Diamondbacks to a World Series title in 2001 and is appreciated by viewers for his candor.

I dont care, Ramirez said. Hes a broadcaster. He should just worry about calling the game. Hes not a coach. Hes not a manager. He should just call the game. The coaches, the managers, the GMs they should take care of the other stuff.

There has been a lot of talk about changing the culture at Wrigley Field. Ramirez will turn 34 this summer and doesnt have time for that. He wants to win a ring.

The only difference is these guys won 96 games last year, Ramirez said. Its different because theyre ready to win now. Theos got different plans. They want to go young. Here, theyre going in a different direction.

Road Ahead: Blackhawks play three home games before All-Star break

Road Ahead: Blackhawks play three home games before All-Star break

CSN's Pat Boyle and Steve Konroyd preview the Blackhawks' three upcoming games in the Road Ahead, presented by Chicagoland & NW Indiana Honda Dealers.

The Blackhawks have three home games before the NHL All-Star break, which takes place in Los Angeles.

The Blackhawks have dates between the Vancouver Canucks, Tampa Bay Lightning, and Winnipeg Jets. All three opponents are out of the playoff picture, sand Steve Konroyd is looking for the Blackhawks to step up in a certain part of their game: scoring.

See what Boyle and Konroyd had to say in the video above.

Bears numbers don't indicate 3-13, yet still lie

Bears numbers don't indicate 3-13, yet still lie

In doing some post-season wrapping up of my Nerdy NFL Notebook as we begin turning the page to the 2017 season, part of it involves compiling where each team finished in big-picture team offensive and defensive categories: overall ranking (total yards), as well as team rushing and passing ranks on both sides of the ball.

So if the Bears wound up ranked 15th overall in total yards gained and allowed, they should've finished…oh, 8-8, right? It adds to the deception of some of the deeper issues that focus on a lack of playmakers, which tied into their inability to make plays when it matters most. In John Fox's 9-23 start, 18 of those games have been decided by six points or less. They've won just six of those games. 

Offensively, the Bears ranked higher in total offense than five playoff teams: Kansas City (20), Detroit (21), Miami (24), New York Giants (25) and Houston (29). They wound up 17th in rushing offense, better than four teams who advanced: Seattle (25), Green Bay (26), New York Giants (29) and Detroit (30). And their 14th-ranked passing offense ranked better than the Giants (17), Kansas City (19), Dallas (23), Miami (26), Houston (29).

On the other side of the ball, they'd be even better off before allowing 109 points over the final three losses. Their total defense ranked better than Detroit (18), Green Bay (22), Kansas City (24), Atlanta (25), Oakland (26) and Miami (29). After being gashed for 558 rushing yards the last three games, they fell to 27th in the NFL against the run (better than only 30th-ranked Miami). But the seventh-ranked pass defense, despite collecting a measly eight interceptions (among only 11 turnovers), was better than nine playoff teams: Miami (15), Pittsburgh (16), Kansas City (18), Detroit (19), the Giants (23), Oakland (24), Dallas (26), Atlanta (28) and Green Bay (31).

[SHOP: Gear up Bears fans!]

What do all the hollow numbers indicate? A lack of complementary, opportunistic football, playmakers on both sides of the ball, a minus-20 turnover ratio, and a lack of quality and continuity at the quarterback position — to name a few. All of those playoff teams have more impact players (or kept more of their impact players healthy) than the Bears in 2016.

While some of the numbers aren't that bad to look at, and some even raise an eyebrow, there's still a deep climb from the most significant numbers: 3-13.