Cubs keep their eyes on Epstein and Friedman

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Cubs keep their eyes on Epstein and Friedman

As the Cubs go down this road, they could reach the point of no return. Really, will they find anyone better out there?

That doesnt mean there is only one truly qualified candidate who can do the job. Remember that before Theo Epstein broke the curse and became immortal, he was 28 years old, with zero experience as a general manager.

The Red Sox took a chance on Epstein, who had spent only a few months as Bostons assistant general manager when he came to power in late November 2002.

Epstein was educated at Yale University and the University of San Diego Law School. He had worked in communications and baseball operations for the San Diego Padres after getting his start as a summer intern with the Baltimore Orioles.

Epstein was part of the new wave of young baseball executives crashing into front offices all around the game. In the past nine seasons, the Red Sox have made the playoffs six times and captured two World Series titles. Theyve won at least 90 games seven times and never less than 86.

Its hard to believe that Cubs chairman Tom Ricketts a careful, deliberate businessman who has told employees that hiring a new general manager will take awhile would make a quick, impulsive decision.

Asking for permission to speak with Epstein who has another year left on his contract is one step. If it comes to this, the expectation is that the Red Sox would try to drive a hard bargain and ask for a high-impact, major-league player as compensation.

Internally, the Cubs have also discussed Rays executive Andrew Friedman, and whether hed be willing to leave Tampa Bay and prove himself in a big market.

Even Stuart Sternberg, the teams principal owner, sounded restless after only 28,299 fans showed up at Tropicana Field for Tuesdays elimination game against the Texas Rangers.

This is untenable as a model going forward, Sternberg told reporters inside the losing clubhouse.

Sternbergs words were even stronger in a St. Petersburg Times column, which quoted him as saying: It won't be my decision, or solely my decision. But eventually, major-league baseball is going to vaporize this team. It could go on nine, 10, 12 more years. But between now and then, it's going to vaporize this team. Maybe a check gets written locally, maybe someone writes me a check (to buy the team). But it's going to get vaporized.

Sternberg and Friedman both used to work on Wall Street and theyre said to be tight. Epsteins relationship with Red Sox team presidentchief executive officer Larry Lucchino seems to be more complicated. For years, theyve been portrayed in the Boston media as both rivals and mentor-protg. It could be time for a new challenge.

Epstein is only 37 years old, but he has already spent more than half his life (20 seasons) inside the big leagues. He once briefly left the Red Sox in late October 2005, formally returning to the organization by January 2006. The Cubs could offer a direct report to ownership and the entire run of baseball operations.

While the Rays charged into the playoffs, the Red Sox endured a stunning September collapse. Manager Terry Francona has already been singled out for blame and wont return next season. Its not necessarily a slam dunk that hed become a package deal with Epstein, though its an intriguing idea.

Theres a theory that all the uncertainty around the Red Sox could pull Epstein back in. Francona spoke to WEEI on Wednesday and addressed his relationship with Epstein on the Boston sports radio station.

When you first start, you have that little honeymoon period, Francona told WEEI. The fact that Theo and I made it through eight years together in this environment I think shows in itself how strong our relationship was. I think there were days when he wanted to wring my neck. I dont blame him.

Youre together that much and youre in a situation where you have to give your opinion. That was always afforded. Im actually proud of our relationship. We butted heads sometimes. I think youre supposed to. But I do know when things were rough, I knew where I could go and I did that til the very end. Im proud of the way we treated each other.

Francona who said he doesnt know if he wants to manage in 2012 was asked if he could work with Epstein again.

It depends what the job is I don't want to be a clubhouse guy, Francona joked. I dont want to speak for Theo. Thats not fair. Hes got his things to take care of this week, I know. Thats his business. He knows the respect I have for him.

Patrick Mooney is CSNChicago.com's Cubs beat writer. Follow Patrick on Twitter @CSNMooney for up-to-the-minute Cubs news and views.

Fast Break Morning Update: Cubs visit White House; Blackhawks, Bulls in action tonight

Fast Break Morning Update: Cubs visit White House; Blackhawks, Bulls in action tonight

Here are some of the top Chicago sports stories from Monday:

Five Things to Watch: Blackhawks collide with Avalanche tonight on CSN

Five Things to Watch: Bulls host Mavericks in search of third straight win

Cubs meet President Obama in unforgettable, symbolic White House visit: ‘They said this day would never come’

Blackhawks' rough weekend 'a little bit of a wake-up call'

The state of the Bulls after the first half of the season

Reports: Dolphins assistant Jeremiah Washburn to be Bears' new O-line coach

Does Cubs president Theo Epstein have a future in politics?

President Obama, with Cubs at White House: 'Among Sox fans, I'm the Cubs' No. 1 fan'

At Cubs' White House visit, President Obama touts Michelle Obama's Cubs fandom, shouts out Jose Cardenal

Fire trade for midfielder Dax McCarty

Cubs meet President Obama in unforgettable, symbolic White House visit: ‘They said this day would never come’

Cubs meet President Obama in unforgettable, symbolic White House visit: ‘They said this day would never come’

WASHINGTON – A "Let's go, Cubbies!" chant started at 1:38 p.m. on Monday when the team walked into the East Room. One minute later, a voice from above announced: "Ladies and gentlemen, the President of the United States." 

"They said this day would never come," Barack Obama said once he got in front of the podium. "Welcome to the White House, the World Series champion Chicago Cubs."

With those words that still sound weird more than two months later, Obama began his last official event at 1600 Pennsylvania Ave., rolling through a speech that lasted almost 22 minutes and delivering a powerful message on Martin Luther King Jr. Day.

"Sometimes people wonder: 'Well, why are you spending time on sports?'" Obama said. "Throughout our history, sports has had this power to bring us together, even when the country's divided. Sports has changed attitudes and culture in ways that seem subtle, but ultimately made us think differently about ourselves and who we were.

"It is a game and it is a celebration. But there's a direct line between Jackie Robinson and me standing here. There’s a direct line between people loving Ernie Banks and the city being able to come together and work together."

As Washington prepares for Donald Trump's inauguration – with the neighborhood turning into a maze of risers, fences and barricades – this became a parting gift from the White Sox fan in chief to all the Obama staffers and alumni who love the Cubs and are now facing life after the White House.  

"Listen, I made a lot of promises in 2008," Obama said, "and we managed to fulfill a large number of them. But even I was not crazy enough to suggest that during these eight years we would see the Cubs win the World Series.

"But I did say that there's never been anything false about hope."

After a searing election, Obama stood front and center in between Cubs board members Laura Ricketts (a Hillary Clinton superdelegate) and Todd Ricketts (Trump's pick to be deputy commerce secretary). With a booming voice and some good speechwriting, Obama commanded a room filled with Hall of Famers (Billy Williams, Fergie Jenkins, Ryne Sandberg) and Illinois politicos (Mayor Rahm Emanuel, Sen. Dick Durbin, Rep. Mike Quigley, Attorney General Lisa Madigan, senior White House advisor Valerie Jarrett).        

Obama mentioned how his administration had hosted at least 50 championship teams in the Oval Office. Until the Cubs showed up, FLOTUS hadn't participated in any of those ceremonies, but she did make time for a private meeting with the group that ended the 108-year drought for her hometown team.    

"The last time the Cubs won the World Series, Teddy Roosevelt was president," Obama said. "Albert Einstein and Thomas Edison (were) still alive. The first Cubs radio broadcast wouldn't be for almost two decades. We've been through World Wars, the Cold War, a Depression, the space race and all manner of social and technological change.

"So the first thing that made this championship so special for so many is the Cubs know what it's like to be loyal and to persevere and to hope and to suffer and then keep on hoping.

"It’s a generational thing (that) Michelle is describing. People all across the city remember the first time their parents took them to Wrigley, their memories of climbing onto their mom and dad's lap to watch games on WGN.

"That’s part of the reason, by the way, why Michelle wanted to make sure Jose Cardenal was here, because that was her favorite player. Back then, he had a big Afro and she would describe how she would try to wear her hat over her Afro the same way.

"You could see (it in) the fans who traveled to their dads' gravesites (and) wore their moms' old jerseys to games (and) covered the brick walls of Wrigley with love notes in chalk to the departed fans whose lifelong faith was finally fulfilled."       

Obama gave shoutouts to David Ross – "we’ve both been on a yearlong retirement party" – and "my fellow 44, Anthony Rizzo." Obama congratulated newlyweds Kris and Jessica Bryant and described how chairman Tom Ricketts met his wife, Cecelia, in the Wrigley Field bleachers "about 30 years ago, which is about 30 years longer than most relationships that begin there last."

Obama turned toward groovy manager Joe Maddon, who wore a black turtleneck and an olive coat, and said: "Let's face it, there are not a lot of coaches or managers who are as cool as this guy. Look how he looks right now."

"He used costume parties and his shaggin' wagon," Obama said. "He's got a lot of tricks to motivate. But he's also a master of tactics and makes the right move at the right time, when to pinch-hit, when to pinch-run, when to make it rain."

The no-shows included Jake Arrieta, Jon Lester and John Lackey, but 22 players stood behind Obama. Dexter Fowler – the first African-American Cub to play in the World Series and now a St. Louis Cardinal – brought Obama a personalized pair of Air Jordans. The group photo included guys from Puerto Rico (Javier Baez), Venezuela (Miguel Montero and Willson Contreras), Cuba (Aroldis Chapman) and the Dominican Republic (Pedro Strop) who will be remembered together forever.

Before Obama exited the stage and the Cubs went to visit the wounded warriors at Walter Reed National Military Medical Center, the president delivered a final thought.

"Sports has a way of sometimes changing hearts in a way that politics or business (can't)," Obama said. "Sometimes it's just a matter of us being able to stay relaxed from the realities of our days. But sometimes it also speaks to something better in us.

"When you see this group of Cubs – different shades, different backgrounds, coming from different communities and different neighborhoods all across the country and then playing as one team and playing the right way and celebrating each other and being joyous in that – that tells us a little something about what America is. And what America can be."