Hoyer calls Soler deal rumors bogus

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Hoyer calls Soler deal rumors bogus

MESA, Ariz. Google search the images for Jorge Soler and all you really get is one grainy photo. Such is the mystery surrounding the Cuban defector who will spark a bidding war.

The Cubs are widely viewed as the frontrunner to land Soler, to the point where some media outlets have portrayed it like theres already an agreement in place.

But the 20-year-old outfielder still has to establish residency in the Dominican Republic and be cleared for free agency, a process that insiders have described as far more complicated than the slam dunk its been made out to be across cyberspace.

Solers representatives were preparing to take him to the market at least as far back as the general manager meetings in Milwaukee last November, and the industry is still waiting.

Hes not a free agent, Cubs general manager Jed Hoyer said this week. The rumors that we have a deal with him are just completely bogus. I dont know where that started, but you guys (in the media) should not run with those rumors. Theyre just rumors and they have no merit.

Still, that doesnt mean it wont happen. Theres no denying that the Cubs have targeted Soler for months and done extensive background work on the prospect.

If signed before July 2, Soler would not be limited by the international cap imposed by the new collective bargaining agreement. The general expectation is that he will become a free agent in time to cash in and beat the deadline. But there are multiple layers of government to go through and, obviously, the process has already taken this long.

Because of Solers youth and five-tool potential and with this being the final international shopping spree before the labor deal sets spending limits the Cubs wont be alone in their pursuit.

Dont bet against the mystery team in the age of Internet rumors. The Oakland As shocked the baseball world last month by landing Yoenis Cespedes with a four-year, 36 million deal.

But there are logical reasons to think Soler could learn The Cubs Way and become a key piece in Theo Epsteins foundation for sustained success.

The Cubs were definitely in on Cespedes and felt like they were able to establish a level of trust with the Cuban defector, though they werent as open to a shorter-term commitment.

This month the Cubs finalized a deal with Gerardo Concepcion, a 20-year-old Cuban left-hander who will get 6 million guaranteed in a five-year, major-league contract. Theres a slight chance Concepcion will appear in a Cactus League game this spring, though the organization hasnt decided where he will begin this season in the minors.

It should take closer to Cespedes money to sign Soler, but the Cubs have already shown a commitment to being big players internationally. Several people in the front office have deep personal and professional connections in Cuba and the Dominican, and reputations and relationships should matter there.

Resources that had been earmarked for the draft and international signings will have to be shifted elsewhere. This is the last prize before the business is regulated. Now is the time to go all in. Soon enough, Solers face will be everywhere.

Cubs reportedly set to trade Jorge Soler to Royals for Wade Davis

Cubs reportedly set to trade Jorge Soler to Royals for Wade Davis

It appears as if the Cubs have answered two big questions surrounding Joe Maddon's team this winter.

With so many solid options in the fold to play everyday in the lineup, the Cubs now reportedly have one less guy to worry about in the outfield and one more pitcher to add into the late-inning mix.

USAToday's Bob Nightengale reported late Tuesday night the Cubs and Kansas City Royals had a deal in place with pitcher Wade Davis coming to Chicago and Jorge Soler acting as the return piece, though the deal was not official yet as of Wednesday morning.

[RELATED - Wade Davis trade would give Cubs a proven October closer]

As Nightengale also said, the Cubs gave up a lot for Davis, who will become a free agent after the 2017 season and was limited to only 43.1 innings in 2016 due to forearm issues:

Before the deal can become official, both players would have to be examined by medical staff for each team to make sure Davis' forearm is fine.

Soler has struggled to stay healthy and cash in on his enormous potential during his two-plus years in the big leagues with the Cubs, but he is still young (he'll turn 25 in February) and won't become a free agent until after the 2020 season.

The main question with Soler entering 2017 was going to be where he would play — and how often — given Kyle Schwarber, Jason Heyward, Jon Jay and Albert Almora were already in the outfield mix and the anticipation Ben Zobrist would also see some time in the outfield with Javy Baez locking down second base.

It's no surprise to see Soler dealt this winter, but as David Kaplan said on Tuesday's CubsTalk podcast, Theo Epstein's front office is all about years of control, but if the deal goes through, they will have traded four years of control of a guy who was their top trade chip for only a year of control on a relief pitcher who has averaged only 61 innings per season the last three years.

However, if the 31-year-old Davis is truly the only return, he helps give the Cubs a boost in 2017.

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Davis — who spent the first four years of his big-league career pitching for Maddon in Tampa Bay — has emerged as one of the premier relief pitchers in baseball over the last three years.

In that span, Davis tallied a 19-4 record with 47 saves in 54 chances, a 1.18 ERA and sparkling 0.892 WHIP. He also struck out 234 batters in 182.2 innings while giving up just three homers. 

As the Cubs look to defend their first World Series title in more than a century, Davis would help shore up the bullpen and given his past experience, would figure to be able to pitch more than just the ninth inning come playoff time (if healthy). Davis would add another elite option alongside Hector Rondon, Pedro Strop and Carl Edwards Jr. in Maddon's remodeled bullpen.

Soler should benefit from a clear path to consistent playing time with the Royals, especially moving to the American League where he can slot in at designated hitter which may ultimately be his best position.
 

Wade Davis trade would give Cubs a proven October closer

Wade Davis trade would give Cubs a proven October closer

NATIONAL HARBOR, Md. — The Cubs are reportedly moving closer toward acquiring Wade Davis — an All-Star closer who’s already notched the final out of the World Series — in a deal with the Kansas City Royals that would involve outfielder Jorge Soler.

The Cubs are making pitching their top priority this week at the winter meetings as they build out the team that will defend the franchise’s first World Series title in 108 years. If healthy, Davis would provide exactly the kind of late-game force the Cubs were looking for when they checked into the Gaylord National Resort & Convention Center outside Washington, D.C.

At a time when Aroldis Chapman and Kenley Jansen are looking to smash the record contract the San Francisco Giants just gave Mark Melancon (four years, $62 million), the Cubs could stay flexible for the future and mitigate risk with Davis, who will make $10 million in 2017 and can become a free agent after that season.

“We’re still talking about a lot of things,” manager Joe Maddon said before the Davis reports surfaced late Tuesday night. “We’re always looking to augment bullpens. Bullpens are so different on an annual basis. And I think every organization — especially after this (postseason) — is looking to reinvent their bullpens in different ways.”

The Royals had been at the forefront of that movement, using Davis as part of a deep, powerful bullpen that helped them shorten games and win back-to-back American League pennants and the 2015 World Series.

Maddon’s Tampa Bay Rays teams originally groomed Davis as a starter before flipping him to the Royals as part of the blockbuster James Shields/Wil Myers deal in December 2012.

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Davis blossomed in Kansas City, putting up ridiculous numbers as a setup guy/closer. He allowed zero homers in 2014 (1.00 ERA) and 2016 (1.87 ERA) and gave up only three in 2015 (0.94 ERA). During that time, he piled up 234 strikeouts against 59 walks in 182 2/3 innings. He has a 0.84 ERA in 32 1/3 career postseason innings.

Davis, 31, dealt with a strained right forearm this year, but injuries have been a recurring issue for Soler, who would be getting squeezed for playing time even when healthy at Wrigley Field.

The Cuban outfielder has shown flashes of his enormous potential since signing a $30 million contract in the summer of 2012. But Soler (.762 career OPS) looks more like a designated hitter who might benefit from a change of scenery to help unlock some of those physical gifts.

Soler still hasn’t turned 25 yet — or come close to playing a full season in the big leagues — but this is why the Cubs stockpiled so many hitters and prepared to make trades for pitching.

Hector Rondon and Pedro Strop almost disappeared during the playoffs, though the Cubs think that can be largely written off as late-season injuries and issues of timing and sharpness. The Cubs believe in Carl Edwards Jr. but still had to carefully manage his innings and appearances during his rookie season.

This wouldn’t necessarily stop with Davis, either. The Cubs plan to give Maddon some shiny new toys in the bullpen.