Jeff Samardzija is just getting started

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Jeff Samardzija is just getting started

MESA, Ariz. This had to be the impression Jeff Samardzija wanted to leave in the minds of Cubs coaches and executives before they gathered in the room.

Its unclear if Samardzijas spot in the rotation was ever really in doubt. But he responded by shutting down the Cleveland Indians for six innings in a 2-0 victory at HoHoKam Stadium that became the run-up to Wednesday nights meeting to finalize the roster.

Well see what happens, Samardzija said, but Im really not too worried about it.

The Cubs took the long view and recognized Samardzijas potential, ignoring their glaring need for a power arm in the bullpen to get the ball to closer Carlos Marmol. They saw a 6-foot-5-inch, 225-pound freakish athlete. They had to find out if he could give them 200 innings instead of 70.

This could be an insight into their thinking: Randy Wells, who was supposed to pitch in relief on Wednesday, didnt get the chance to make a final impression. He was pushed back to start on Sunday and seems to profile well as the long man.

The answers will be revealed on Thursday, after manager Dale Sveum sits down with team president Theo Epstein, general manager Jed Hoyer and other club officials.

Well all be in the meeting and give our two cents, Sveum said. We got 22 or 21 guys that are pretty much decided and well spend more than four hours on the other four guys.

You go back and forth in all kinds of scenarios and sometimes a guy brings (one up) and youre like, Oh, I didnt think of that one and you got to cover your butt (and) you might spend 45 minutes on (that).

Will they spend much time on Samardzija? He showed that he learned something from his last outing seven runs on 10 hits in four innings against the Colorado Rockies and kept a left-handed Indians lineup off-balance.

Samardzija struck out five, walked one and allowed only three hits. He even tripled and showed off the speed (its still there) that made him a football star at Notre Dame.

Thats what Ive been preaching for years now, Samardzija said. I want to be an athlete. I want to hit. I want to run the bases. I want to field my position (and) show I can do it.

Instead of relaxing after a breakthrough season (8-4, 2.75 ERA), Samardzija purposely moved to his place in Arizona and trained at the Cubs complex. He worked out alongside Ryan Dempster, the leader of the pitching staff.

He really wants it bad, Dempster said. Hes come a long way as a pitcher. Hes 27, but hes got like a 24-year-old arm, because he didnt pitch all those years when he was too busy scoring touchdown passes.

Youve seen huge improvements. Hes got tremendous stuff, great makeup and a lot of confidence. He can do some special things.

From the moment you walked into Fitch Park six weeks ago, you noticed Samardzijas sense of urgency. It almost became a running joke: Looks like Samardzijas headed to the rotation just ask him.

I really learned a lot over these past five spring trainings, he said. Being a young guy, you got to come into camp like spring is the season. Unless youve got a six-year deal and eight years in the big leagues, nothings for sure in camp.

I didnt take anything for granted this year. I just wanted to be ready to go, (so) I knew that whatever happened, I left it all out there.

The new decision-makers are intrigued by how much is still left. The ironic part is that Samardzija was aligned closely with former general manager Jim Hendry, who structured a five-year, 10 million contract that convinced him to not pursue the NFL.

In 13 months, the conversation has gone from the Cubs having to carry Samardzija on the roster, to the team thinking he could lift the rotation.

Ive been in meetings where they can get really heated, because some people are attached to somebody and that means a lot, Sveum said. But sometimes you have to put your feelings aside when it comes to these decisions and (remember) whats best for the 25 guys and the organization.

That likely means Samardzija will get what he wants.

CSN will air six Cubs spring training games in 2017

CSN will air six Cubs spring training games in 2017

Cubs fans will get to see 10 spring training games on TV in 2017 as they begin their World Series title defense, including six contests on CSN.

The Cubs released their spring broadcast schedule Monday afternoon, featuring 10 games on TV, 10 on the radio on 670 The Score and then 27 internet radio broadcasts on Cubs.com.

Len Kasper and Mick Gillispie will be the broadcasters for Cubs.com games while Kasper and Jim Deshaies will serve as the announcers for all TV contests.

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Here are all six of CSN's broadcasts (all game times in Mountain Time Zone): 

—Wednesday, March 15 (7:05 p.m.) vs. Diamondbacks
—Sunday, March 19 (7:05 p.m.) vs. Royals
—Wednesday, March 22 (6:05 p.m.) vs. Reds
—Saturday, March 25 (1:05 p.m. PT) vs. Reds
—Tuesday, March 28 (1:05 p.m.) vs. Giants
—Friday, March 31 (1:10 p.m. CT) vs. Astros

Here's the complete Cubs spring schedule:

Cubs' Carl Edwards Jr. looks to follow in Mariano Rivera's footsteps

Cubs' Carl Edwards Jr. looks to follow in Mariano Rivera's footsteps

Carl Edwards Jr. couldn't dream up a better pitcher to try to emulate than Mariano Rivera.

Not for a young right-hander who is still getting used to being a reliever with a cutter as his bread and butter pitch.

After picking up his first career save late in 2016, Edwards mentioned how he has been watching video of Rivera. At the Cubs Convention earlier this month, Edwards name-dropped Rivera again in response to a fan question and went into more detail with exactly what he's aiming to accomplish by watching Rivera tape.

Let's be clear: Mariano Rivera is inimitable. He's a once-in-a-lifetime talent and there almost assuredly will never be a better closer in Major League Baseball.

But Edwards knows that. 

"He's great. He's a Hall of Famer," Edwards said. "He goes out there like he has the world in the palm of his hand. He's very competitive; I've never seen him back down. That's one [takeaway] for myself — I'm gonna go out and never back down.

"I don't really get into trying to be like him. I just look more into how he goes about his business. That's something that I can control — how I go about my business."

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Cubs coach Mike Borzello was there with Rivera in 1997 when the now-legendary cutter was born.

It's not fair to compare Edwards' cutter to one of the greatest pitches ever, but his version is pretty nasty in its own right:

The Cubs are still searching for long-term answers in the rotation, but don't have any intentions of moving Edwards back to a role as a starter.

Like Edwards, Rivera began his career as a starting pitcher coming up through the Yankees system. But Edwards actually has a leg up on baseball's all time saves leader: Edwards' first save came in his age 24 season while Rivera didn't tally his first save until age 26 in New York.

Edwards also struck out 13 batters per nine innings in 2016 while Rivera never posted eye-popping whiff totals (a career 8.2 K/9 rate).

As Edwards gets set for what he and the Cubs hope will be his first full season in the big leagues in 2017, his maturation will be important in an age of baseball where relief pitchers have never been more valued.

Rivera pitched in the playoffs nearly every year, routinely working more than one inning and posting ridiculous postseason numbers: 0.70 ERA, 0.759 WHIP and 42 saves while taking home the World Series MVP in 1999 and ALCS MVP in 2003.

The Cubs hope Edwards will be pitching in the postseason on a regular basis, too.

For now, the 25-year-old is still reveling in the glory following the 2016 Cubs championship.

He served as honorary drummer at the Carolina Panthers game in November.

"That was pretty amazing. That's a highlight of my offseason," Edwards said.

He grew up as a Pittsburgh Steelers fan despite being a South Carolina native, but Edwards said he did get a pair of Cam Newton cleats to wear for 2017 when he and Cubs teammates like Addison Russell or Matt Szczur throw the football around in the outfield to get loose.

Edwards was also blown away by the reception from Cubs fans at the Convention — "This is my third year and every year as been better" — but still hasn't fully wrapped his mind around the ending of the 108-year drought.

"Everything happened so quick," he said. "Hopefully in the next couple weeks when I have a break, I can sit down and soak it all in."