Ricketts leaves Cubs waiting for answers

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Ricketts leaves Cubs waiting for answers

SAN DIEGO From the outside, it looks like the season slowly winds down in September. But when you wear a uniform for almost eight months, it comes to a complete, jarring stop.

The Cubs have tried to project the image of business as usual as they go through this transition period. But that illusion is just about over. The next general manager will decide their fates.

Chairman Tom Ricketts who addressed the team before Wednesdays game declined to comment on the search. He continues to gather information from contacts throughout the industry. He sounds ready to wait it out until he gets the answers he wants.

Well do it as efficiently and as quickly as possible, Ricketts said. But its a big decision. Theres no point in rushing it. We got to have the right guy at the right time. And however long it takes, it takes.

Ricketts met with manager Mike Quade shortly after he fired Jim Hendry, and again last week before the team left Chicago for the seasons final road trip. Quade is signed through next season, but his entire coaching staff isnt, leaving them all in limbo.

Its a big organizational decision, Quade said. Right now, its bigger than any of us, whether we like it or not. So you be patient or not (and) you say, I cant do this, Ive got to go look for work. But I think you have to keep things in perspective.

The courtesys been given to say, Look, its going to take awhile.

Ricketts recently locked up vice president of player personnel Oneri Fleita with a new four-year contract because the Detroit Tigers showed interest. There was a sense of urgency because Fleita is a point man for the new academy the Cubs are planning to build in the Dominican Republic.

Oneri is a really valuable part of this organization, Ricketts said. I think that any general manager coming in would agree with that. Its just a step we took to make sure that we have good continuity and (keep) building on the things we think were doing well.

Ricketts again said that Tim Wilken does a terrific job, though the scouting director did not get a similar extension. Wilkens signed through the 2012 season and has been given the authority to renew contracts within his department.

Quade and his coaches havent received any votes of confidence like that from ownership. Among the staff, there is a level of anxiety and an understanding that the next general manager will likely want his guys.

By nature, Quade is a stubborn optimist. He never played in the big leagues and still landed his dream job. Hes been fired before and has viewed his entire career to this point as a series of one-year contracts.

It hasnt been what we hoped for, Quade said. But Im not disappointed in the way I handled things and the way I went about my business. Good seasons, bad seasons, you go home and evaluate and youre always trying to get better.

I still feel pretty good about this job and doing what I do. If somebody else has a different thought (coming) in here, then theyll make that decision.

Several high-profile players including Carlos Pena, Aramis Ramirez and Ryan Dempster could be positioned to become free agents. If the search drags on, and the Cubs are forced to make some personnel decisions, Ricketts will get input from interim general manager Randy Bush. The chairman wont rule anything out.

With more than three million tickets again sold this year at Wrigley Field, Ricketts indicated that the overall budget for baseball operations will essentially remain the same next season. It would be up to the next general manager to determine how much is allocated for major-league payroll.

The Ricketts family has talked about owning this team for generations, but the chairman doesnt view 2012 as a bridge year or see this team being that far from contention. He pointed to the Arizona Diamondbacks who went from worst to first this season and the Cubs teams Hendry rebuilt on the fly.

One thing youve seen in baseball over the last few years is that turnarounds can happen pretty quickly, Ricketts said. I dont think its meaningful to describe a year as a rebuilding year or a reloading year or any of that.

You get the right players on the team and they all stay healthy and they play hard, the team can go from 70 wins to 90 wins. It happens pretty frequently. Things turn around fast. Thats the way we look at it for next year.
Patrick Mooney is CSNChicago.com's Cubs beat writer. Follow Patrick on Twitter @CSNMooney for up-to-the-minute Cubs news and views.

Cubs, White Sox react to tragic deaths of Yordano Ventura and Andy Marte

Cubs, White Sox react to tragic deaths of Yordano Ventura and Andy Marte

The sports world woke up to some tragic news on Sunday morning.

Former major leaguer Andy Marte and Kansas City Royals pitcher Yordano Ventura were both killed in separate car accidents in the Dominican Republic within an hour of each other, according to multiple reports. A Royals representative confirmed the death of 25-year-old Ventura.

The Cubs and White Sox took to Twitter to give their condolences:

Ventura was a member of the Royals from 2013-16 and won a World Series title in 2015 with Ben Zobrist and Wade Davis, who the Cubs acquired this offseason for Jorge Soler. Ventura also played with White Sox pitcher James Shields in 2013-14.

Marte, 33, played a majority of his seven-year career with the Cleveland Indians. He was teammates with Todd Hollandsworth (Atlanta 2005), Kerry Wood (Cleveland 2009-10), and Miguel Montero (Arizona 2014).

Why Cubs are excited for pitching prospect Dylan Cease: He's 'throwing lightning bolts'

Why Cubs are excited for pitching prospect Dylan Cease: He's 'throwing lightning bolts'

Theo Epstein's front office is heading into Year 6 with the Cubs and they're finally talking about a pitcher as one of the organization's most exciting prospects.

That's how senior vice president of scouting and player development Jason McLeod framed his Dylan Cease report to fans at the Cubs Convention at the Sheraton Grand Chicago last weekend.

It was a tongue-in-cheek summation from McLeod after he spent the previous few minutes fawning over Cease, the Cubs' sixth round pick in 2014.

Of course, McLeod and the Cubs can poke fun at the lack of impact pitching the farm system has developed when the homegrown position players like Kris Bryant and Kyle Schwarber just helped lead the franchise to its first World Series championship in over a century.

Cease, however, has been one of the more intriguing Cubs prospects for years — a right-handed pitcher capable of touching 101 mph on the radar gun.

"This guy is throwing lightning bolts out of his arm," McLeod said. "It's really exciting. But we also understaned he's only in Low-A this year, so he's far away."

The Cubs expect Cease to pitch for Class-A South Bend in 2017 after spending last season pitching for short-season Eugene and the 2015 campaign working in the rookie league in Arizona.

Cease — who just turned 21 in late December — put up some impressive numbers at both stops in the Cubs system, posting a 2.36 ERA and 1.165 WHIP to go along with a whopping 91 strikeouts in 68.2 innings. He also only surrendered one homer and walked more batters (41) than reached via a basehit (39).

Control is obviously an issue for Cease, but the upside is evident.

"He's so far away," McLeod said. "He's gonna go into 2017 as a starter. As with a lot of young guys, it's gonna come down to command and depend on that third pitch and the ability to land them for strikes.

"It's a special arm. He can pitch 95-100 mph with a big power curveball. He's unlike anyone else we have in our system since we've been here in terms of pure stuff."

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One fan compared Cease to Carl Edwards Jr. in terms of their lanky build and high velocity, setting McLeod up for a layup joke.

"Well, Dylan is much stronger physically than CJ is...as is everybody in this room," McLeod said as the ballroom filled with laugher. "Don't tell [CJ] I said that. 

"They have different body types, obviously. Carl is long and lanky and Dylan has probably put on 20 pounds since we drafted him, so he's more like 6-foot-2, 190."

By comparison, Edwards — who goes by "The String Bean Slinger" for his slight build — is listed at 6-foot-3, 170 pounds.

Edwards was drafted in the 48th round in 2011 and spent his whole minor-league career as a starting pitcher until the Cubs converted him to a reliever in 2015.

Cease may eventually go down the same path, but the Cubs are going to give him every opportunity to make it as a starter first.

Cease was one of the top pitchers available in the 2014 draft, but his stock took a hit when he was forced to undergo Tommy John surgery on his pitching elbow while at Milton High School in Georgia.

That scared off a lot of teams — as did the potential signability issues with college offers looming — but the Cubs took a chance and have now watched Cease soar to a top prospect in the system (No. 4 by Baseball America; No. 7 by FanGraphs and Baseball Prospectus) despite the cautious approach and lack of innings in professional ball.

"We have to thank Kyle Schwarber, actually, as one of the main reasons we got to sign Dylan Cease," McLeod said. "Because we took Kyle fourth overall, we were able to save money on the selection with him, which gave us the resources to go get Dylan Cease.

"He was a Top 10 pick in the draft — a high school arm that got hurt, fell down to the fifth round and he had a commitment to Vanderbilt, I think it was, and we were able to use the money we saved from Kyle.

"Just another reason to love Kyle Schwarber."