Is Sveum the right man for the job?

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Is Sveum the right man for the job?

New Cubs manager Dale Sveum was announced at an introductory press conference Friday morning from Wrigley Field.

He said all the right things. He has the support of Theo's Trio. He fits in with what HardballTalk's Craig Calcaterra is deeming Epstein's "bald manager."

So will Sveum be the right man for the job?

I mean, it's one press conference, so I don't know. He hasn't done anything yet. The on-field play for the Cubs is still poor. They still lost 91 games last year. Sveum hasn't managed a game yet and won't for another few months.

But he talked about defense, stressing how each player should spend at least as much time on their defense as they do in the batting cage.

Not that a statement like this is so bold. The Cubs finished 2011 with 134 errors, the most in the MLB by a wide margin (10 more than runner-up Oakland). Any idiot could look at a stat sheet and know the Cubs need to stress defense in '12 (hell, I figured it out, so it can't be rocket science).

From this press conference and the other times I've seen him on camera, Sveum seems to be one of those guys that is always pretty mellow. He never gets too high or too low. Not much affects him. Which is a very good quality for a manager to have.

Oh, we just made errors on back-to-back-back plays? No need to freak out. Oh, we just hit back-to-back-to-back home runs? No need to jump for joy.

That's good for Chicago. Attitude trickles down from the manager. With the Cubs and their "Cubbie occurences" and "curses," they need a manager that won't just throw in the towel mentally when something bad goes down.

Sveum has humor. When asked about his nickname nuts, he said "It has nothing to do with my lower half. But more to do with up here," he joked as he pointed to his bald head.

Sveum will treat his players with respect, as he would treat his own son.

And when discussing the Cubs playing day games and how players complain about it, Sveum used the word "whined" instead, showing his edge and no-nonsense attitude.

As commenter Darion Denham in our live press conference stream and chat said, Sveum seems a bit like Bulls head coach Tom Thibodeau in that he doesn't tolerate excuses and he wants to get better day-by-day. In this town right now, it's never bad to be like Tommy T in anything.

So there's a lot of good here. But as a Cubs fan, I've learned to temper my expectations.

Sveum talked the talk. Now it's time to walk the walk.

Cubs in holding pattern with Jorge Soler

Cubs in holding pattern with Jorge Soler

PITTSBURGH — The Cubs are downplaying the discomfort Jorge Soler has been feeling on his right side, saying the injury-prone outfielder should be cleared by this weekend and for what they hope will be a long run into October.

Soler stayed back in Chicago for another MRI and didn’t travel with the team to Pittsburgh, where the Cubs are trying to find the right balance between keeping players rested and sharp with a division title and the National League’s No. 1 seed already clinched.

“Nothing horrible,” manager Joe Maddon said Tuesday at PNC Park. “Nothing to be highly concerned about. But we kept him back for the test.”

Soler — who had already gotten an initial scan — didn’t play in five consecutive games (Sept. 17-21). He then pinch-hit against the St. Louis Cardinals on Friday and started in right field the next day at Wrigley Field.

“The side bothers him,” Maddon said. “It wasn’t bad. I know that.”

[SHOP CUBS: Get your NL Central champions gear right here]

A series of injuries have stalled Soler’s career — he missed almost two months this season with a strained left hamstring — but there is no denying his immense talent, right-handed power and age-24 potential.

Built like an NFL linebacker, Soler is hitting .240 with 12 homers, 31 RBIs and a .773 OPS in 85 games, making him a physical presence in the lineup that opponents have to respect.

Whether or not you believe in the concept of clutch hitting, Soler played a big role in knocking the Cardinals out of last year’s playoffs, setting a new major-league record by getting on base in his first nine career postseason plate appearances and launching two homers in four games.

SportsTalk Live Podcast: Cubs reach 100 wins for first time since 1935

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SportsTalk Live Podcast: Cubs reach 100 wins for first time since 1935

CSN's David Kaplan hosts a discussion with today's panel: Ravi Baichwal from ABC 7, David Haugh lead columnist from the Chicago Tribune, and Mark Lazerus of the Chicago Sun Times. The group discusses the Cubs reaching 100 wins on the season, talk Jay Cutler's future as Bears QB, and Scott Paddock stops by to talk NASCAR.

Listen to the SportsTalk Live Podcast below: