Sveum says Soriano doesnt need the big stick

Sveum says Soriano doesnt need the big stick
May 13, 2012, 8:39 pm
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MILWAUKEE Maybe Alfonso Soriano connects and goes off on one of those hot streaks where he carries the Cubs offense.

But its the middle of May and the 136 million man still hasnt hit a home run yet.

The fact of the matter is fastballs are getting too deep, manager Dale Sveum said Sunday. Whatever it is, its just a strange phenomenon right now that Edwin Maysonet has more home runs than Alfonso Soriano.

Maysonet, a Milwaukee Brewers utility guy, got his first one in Saturdays win over the Cubs. (Sveum said that Chris Volstad who gave up that grand slam and has a 6.92 ERA will make his next start and keep a spot in the rotation for now.) Outside of Bryan LaHair, the Cubs havent seen many big moments like that.

Thats tough to swallow, Sveum said. We got to get some two- and three-run home runs out of that position. Theres no question about it. Were having trouble sustaining innings.

Soriano woke up on Sunday hitting .250 with 15 RBI and a .284 on-base percentage. Sveum, an old hitting coach, has suggested using a different bat.

Soriano has been open to the idea and made some changes. But Sveum said Soriano just didnt go as far as I wanted.

Theres no question Id like to see a much lighter bat, Sveum said. He has adjusted a little bit, but I think a really smaller, lighter bat would help a lot.

Soriano is among the teams hardest workers, and one of the more popular players in the clubhouse. He does not have a reputation of being difficult to deal with.

Its one of those things where you can tell a guy to use a really small, light bat Sveum said. The physics alone it makes sense.

Youre talking a few ounces two, three ounces and I think a shorter bat only makes sense to help out. Theres no question.

Maybe it will all even out for Soriano by the end of the year. Albert Pujols and David Ortiz are the only two other players with 10-straight 20-homer seasons through 2011.

The power outage in Southern California became a national story. It took Pujols until May 6 before he hit his first home run for the Los Angeles Angels.

Soriano is 36 years old and likes swinging the big bat. Its worked for most of his career. Hes watched his 340 homers fly in the big leagues. His manager understands the dynamics.

Its very hard to do, Sveum said. Its almost like a (mechanical thing). Its hard to change your mechanics. Its hard to change something thats felt so comfortable.

Sometimes when you take a 35-, 35-and-a-half-inch bat, and you make it 34, (it) looks like its 31 inches, (just) so much smaller. Those things are harder to get over than people think.