What if the Cubs traded Zambrano for Figgins?

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What if the Cubs traded Zambrano for Figgins?

I declare today National Carlos Zambrano Day. Well, maybe not "National" but at least "Regional." As in the region in or around Chicago.

We've already discussed how Zambrano's time spent on the shelf with a facial injury will continue, but now let's move into something fun. Something that involves Zambrano packing up and heading out of town.

What if the Cubs traded Zambrano to the Seattle Mariners for Chone Figgins?

Figgins suffered through a simply horrendous 2011 season. If it wasn't for Adam Dunn, Figgins' .188 average and .484 on-base plus slugging (OPS) would have been talked about a lot more.

But he was talked about quite often in Seattle, and there's no doubt he could use a change of scenery. Zambrano needs a change of scenery, too, and both players are under the Bad Contract Umbrella.

This is a bit crazy and something that hasn't even been sniffed at as of yet, but it could work. Let us count the ways:

Why This Could Work

1. Figgins was OK offensively in '10. He sported just a .259 AVG, but 74 walks helped bump his on-base percentage to .340. He stole 42 bases in 57 chances and while he boasts almost no power (he has a career .368 slugging percentage), he can still be an offensive asset.

2. Figgins is 33 now and his 11 steals in 17 chances last season were horrendous, but if he got on base a bit more, he could be some of the speed the Cubs need. Chicago finished 28th in the Majors last season with just 69 stolen bases. The only two teams below them -- the Cardinals and Tigers -- both made the playoffs and the Cards even won the World Series, but they also boast better pitching staffs and a lineup loaded with much more power than the Cubs, so speed is a way to improve for Chicago.

3. Figgins can play both second and third base. He's even dabbled in outfield and at shortstop in his career, too. He's also actually been an above-average defender since 2007. If the issues with his bat continue, it wouldn't be that terrible to move Figgins from an everyday starter to just a utility guy. I'd take him over Blake DeWitt.

4. The Cubs have literally no answer at third base. A platoon of DeWitt and Jeff Baker makes me more nervous than being in a locked room with Carlos Zambrano would. D.J. LeMahieu and Josh Vitters are not quite ready yet and Figgins could be a great stopgap until either -- or both -- mature.

5. The Mariners need to get rid of Figgins' contract while the Cubs need to get rid of Z's contract. Figgins is still owed 17 million over the next two years, while Zambrano has just one year and 18 million left on his albatross contract. I mean, I wasn't a math major, but that's basically the same amount of money we're talking about here, folks.

6. A change of scenery could do these guys good. Zambrano needs a fresh start with a new organization that hasn't directly experienced his behavioral issues. Figgins needs a better ballpark to hit in (though Safeco is more detrimental to a power hitter, not a speed guy like Figgins) and a fresh start to get his career back on track. Both are capable of still being very effective Major Leaguers and are worth taking the risk.

7. The Cubs and Mariners have made "bad contract" for "bad contract" trades in the past, including just the Carlos SilvaMilton Bradley deal. That kinda sorta worked for both sides. This can kinda sorta work, too.

8. I want it to work. And that's good enough for me.

Tyson Ross could be one of the final pieces for Cubs’ offseason puzzle

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AP

Tyson Ross could be one of the final pieces for Cubs’ offseason puzzle

Tyson Ross could be one of the final pieces of the offseason puzzle as the Cubs try to defend their World Series title while still planning for the future.

The Cubs left this week’s winter meetings in Maryland still involved in the Ross talks, sources said, monitoring an intriguing pitcher they had targeted before the 2015 trade deadline.

The San Diego Padres didn’t really buy or sell during that pennant race and made another curious decision last week when they didn’t offer Ross a contract for 2017. MLB Trade Rumors projected Ross would have made $9.6 million during his final year in the arbitration system.

After issues involving his right shoulder wiped out almost his entire season, Ross underwent surgery in October to address thoracic outlet syndrome.

Ross was San Diego’s Opening Day starter during a 15-0 loss to the Los Angeles Dodgers, but didn’t pitch again, clouding a future that once had him looking like a trade-deadline chip and one of the best pitchers in the free-agent class after the 2017 season.

That’s when Jake Arrieta will be looking for his megadeal and John Lackey might be in retirement and Jon Lester will be turning 34. That’s why the Cubs are so focused on pitching this winter and trying to balance out an organization tilted toward hitters.

[SHOP CUBS: Get your World Series champions gear right here]

Kyle Hendricks proved he will be a pitcher to build around – and the Cubs believe Mike Montgomery can evolve from a swingman into a fifth starter and maybe something far more valuable – but depth is a real issue.

Ross made 30-plus starts in 2014 and 2015, when he earned an All-Star selection and accounted for almost 400 innings combined. He will turn 30 in April and is seen as a positive force within the clubhouse. He has a 6-foot-6 frame, a second-round-pick pedigree and a Cal-Berkeley education.

Reports have already linked the Texas Rangers and Pittsburgh Pirates to Ross and not completely ruled out a return to San Diego. During an offseason where the free-agent market is essentially devoid of reliable frontline starters, there could be sticker shock, even with a rehabbing pitcher.

Trading for Wade Davis meant the Cubs were out of the bidding for Greg Holland, another All-Star closer who helped turn the Kansas City Royals into World Series champions. Holland spent this year recovering from Tommy John surgery on his right elbow, but he will still be in position to capitalize after Mark Melancon, Aroldis Chapman and eventually Kenley Jansen reset the market for closers.

With Ross, the Cubs will have to get a better sense of the medical picture and the price for all that upside.

Beyond a winning culture, the Cubs can sell the pitching infrastructure that helped turn Arrieta into a Cy Young Award winner and transform Hendricks into an ERA leader and keep the rotation remarkably healthy.

“Those really talented pitchers are going to be in demand, even those that are coming off an injury,” Cubs president Theo Epstein said this week at National Harbor. “We’ll stay engaged on some of those guys, but they’ll have to be just the right talent.

“We’ll have to feel good about the medical and the return to play. And the fit on the club would have to be right, too. But the true elite guys have a real market, even if they’re coming off down seasons.”

Cubs' MVP Kris Bryant signs multi-year extension with Adidas

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USA TODAY

Cubs' MVP Kris Bryant signs multi-year extension with Adidas

Kris Bryant just keeps on winning in 2016.

Two months after leading the Cubs to their first World Series title in 108 years, Bryant signed a multi-year extension with Adidas.

"It's a phenomenal time to be partnered with Adidas with all the energy and momentum that the brand has right now," Bryant said via a press release. "Adidas embraced me as part of the family from the start."

Bryant was named National League MVP after hitting .292 with 39 homers and 102 RBIs. He hit .308 with three homers and 8 RBIs in the postseason.

Bryant first signed with Adidas in 2014 after the Cubs made him the No. 2 pick in the 2013 MLB Draft.