Why Sveum, Maddux make sense for Cubs

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Why Sveum, Maddux make sense for Cubs

Theo Epstein says that he doesn't want to recreate The Boston Show.

Reading between the lines in Chicago, that was probably more telling than anything else Epstein said about how Terry Francona would be at the top of anyones list.

Epstein admits that he has run only one other search for a manager. But Epstein and general manager Jed Hoyer clearly have confidence in the process that identified two finalists who were not obvious future stars almost eight years ago.

There is the sense that the Cubs are looking for the next Francona or the next Joe Maddon. Casting calls will continue on Monday at Wrigley Field, where Brewers hitting coach Dale Sveum will audition, followed by Rangers pitching coach Mike Maddux later in the week.

Sveum has built-in relationships with Epstein and Hoyer. He was part of Franconas staff when the Red Sox won their first World Series in 86 years. Beyond those curse-busting credentials, he has a broad base of experience.

After lasting 12 seasons in the big leagues, Sveum managed Pittsburghs Double-A affiliate from 2001-03. He then became Franconas third-base coach and felt the heat from Boston fans and media for his aggressive decisions to wave in runners.

Sveum understands big-city pressures and has been described as someone whos embraced statistical analysis. It says something about his value and personality that he worked for three different managers in Milwaukee (as third-base, bench and hitting coach).

Sveum was the interim manager when the Brewers made a playoff run in 2008. He will turn 48 later this month, an age where he can grow into the job, an idea Epstein has suggested for the next leader.

As much as the Cubs have tried to copy the Red Sox model, chairman Tom Ricketts also studied the Brewers before hiring Epstein, the way theyve been able to produce homegrown impact players and have success in a small market.

MLB Network analyst Dan Plesac knows the history and expectations surrounding the Cubs. He played with Sveum and thinks his former teammate would be a logical fit on the North Side.

He knows the National League Central, Plesac said on Chicago Tribune Live last week. Hes been with a younger group of guys. You go back to the magical run with CC Sabathia. He inherited that team right before the postseason and there were a lot of people in Milwaukee that were really disappointed that he didnt get that job.

Sources have indicated that bench coaches Sandy Alomar Jr. (Indians), DeMarlo Hale (Red Sox) and Dave Martinez (Rays) figure to be involved in the search, though the Cubs havent confirmed exactly when the next round of interviews will take place.

Sveum has already interviewed in Boston, just like Philadelphias 60-year-old bench coach Pete Mackanin, the first candidate to come to Wrigley Field last week. Maddux will reportedly interview on Tuesday in Boston.

Theres a growing acceptance of pitching coaches becoming managers. Hoyer developed a good relationship with Bud Black in San Diego. John Farrell Bostons former pitching coach got good reviews during his first season in Toronto and could have been Franconas logical replacement if he werent under contract.

Epstein views keeping pitchers healthy and having them perform at a higher level as the next frontier. Those questions have vexed the entire industry. The Cubs are staring at a huge void in their rotation, and pitching figures to be their biggest need this winter.

In Texas, Maddux and Nolan Ryan pushed their pitching staff. They werent afraid to increase workloads and change the culture in a ballpark that was known for offensive fireworks.

Maddux helped guide the Rangers to the World Series twice in the past two years. He would be an intriguing choice even if he didnt have famous bloodlines. His brother Greg had been a special assistant to Jim Hendry. The future Hall of Famer recently spoke with Epstein.

Even with Hendry gone, these two ideas still remain true: Greg could have almost any job he wants in baseball, but family concerns could prevent him from taking on a full-time role right now.

(Greg) certainly appreciated knowing that he was welcome, Epstein said last week. Im sure it will work out in some form or another down the road. We agreed to stay in touch.

Epstein doesnt seem to want to be the star of this show, even though thats what everyones hyped him up to be. Hoyer is supposed to be the day-to-day voice.

The manager will be the face of the narrative, responsible for some 400 media sessions each year. Thats why each candidate will be made available to reporters as part of the interview. In the coming days, look for that image to come sharply into focus.

SportsTalk Live Podcast: Cubs visit White House as World Series champions

SportsTalk Live Podcast: Cubs visit White House as World Series champions

On the latest edition of the SportsTalk Live Podcast, David Kaplan is joined by David Haugh (Chicago Tribune) and Jason Goch (SB Nation Radio) to discuss the Cubs' visit to the White House.

The guys reflect on the historic day and Theo Epstein's speech. Then, the panel breaks down the Packers' impressive run and question whether it's okay for Bears fans to appreciate Aarond Rodgers and company.

Finally, are the Wild the Blackhawks' biggest threat come playoff time?

Listen to the SportsTalk Live podcast below.

 

Does Cubs president Theo Epstein have a future in politics?

Does Cubs president Theo Epstein have a future in politics?

WASHINGTON – President Barack Obama has a job for Theo Epstein whenever the Cubs executive gets bored or starts to feel restless and wants to think about life beyond baseball.  

After building up the Boston Red Sox and turning around the Cubs, how about Epstein using his leadership skills, analytical personality, sense of conviction and Ivy League education to save the Democratic Party?    

"His job is to quench droughts – 86 years in Boston, 108 in Chicago," Obama said during Monday's White House ceremony honoring the World Series champs. "He takes the reins of an organization that's wandering in the wilderness and delivers them to the promised land. I talked to him about being DNC chair."

Epstein stood behind the president doing a cut-it gesture and that became one of many laugh lines during an entertaining Obama speech that lasted more than 20 minutes and took place against the backdrop of Donald Trump's looming administration. Epstein – who headlined a Lincoln Park fundraiser during the 2012 reelection campaign and attended the president's farewell address last week at McCormick Place – doesn't see his future in politics.

At least "not as a candidate or an elected official," Epstein said during a media scrum afterward. "But I think there are a lot of ways that we can all impact our communities without necessarily running for office."

Epstein – a private person who would never want to subject his young family to that kind of scrutiny – looked like official Washington in a navy blue suit and a striped silver-and-blue tie. He delivered his own speech in the East Room, beginning it by saying "what a tough act to follow."

"We know you may have certain allegiances to another team on the other side of town," Epstein said to the world's most famous White Sox fan. "But we know you're a very proud Chicagoan. And we know your better, wiser half – the first lady – has been a lifelong and very loyal Cub fan, which we appreciate very much.

"Of course, we have great faith in your intelligence, your common sense, your pragmatism, your ability to recognize a good thing when you see one.

"So Mr. President, with only a few days remaining in your tremendous presidency, we have taken the liberty here today of offering you a midnight pardon.

"And so we welcome you with open arms."

This formal ceremony sounded personal for Epstein, who led the presentation giving Obama white and gray No. 44 jerseys, a 44 Wrigley Field scoreboard panel, a lifetime pass to the iconic stadium and an autographed W flag to someday fly at his presidential library on the South Side.  

"Everyone – no matter where you fall politically – can appreciate the dignity with which he served the country," Epstein said. "He did an unbelievable job handling the office and raising his family while here. I think, across the board, folks would agree that he's very dignified and brought a lot of integrity to the office. It was our pleasure to thank him for that today."

[RELATED: 'Among Sox fans, I'm the Cubs' No. 1 fan']

The DNC – or whatever Epstein does for his next act – will have to wait. Before that epic playoff run began, the Cubs locked up Epstein with a five-year deal believed to be worth in the neighborhood of $50 million, putting the future Hall of Fame executive in position to make another trip to the White House with a championship team.          

"Good thing I signed a contract with (chairman) Tom Ricketts," Epstein said. "He was kicking me, saying I can’t leave. It was a kind offer, though."