Beckham impersonates Peavy for TakeJake campaign

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Beckham impersonates Peavy for TakeJake campaign

The Chicago White Sox have done just about everything to get right-hander Jake Peavy to the All-Star Game in Kansas City, with every stunt stemming from the TakeJake hashtag on Twitter.

But second baseman Gordon Beckham took the movement to a whole new level when he impersonated Peavy in an interview with 670 The Score's Chris Rongey on MLB.com.

In the interview, Beckham comes out wearing a "TakeJake" sleveless T-shirt, earbuds around his neck and a guitar which he gives to someone off camera before sitting down with Rongey.

When asked why he should be voted into the All-Star Game, "Peavy" replied:

"When I get out there, I give 100 percent all the time, every time. I go out there, and it's not even about me. I just want to go out there and give my team a chance to win. I really hope I do make it.

"But if it doesn't happen, there's other things I gotta do. I could play my guitar and stuff like that, and I'm just excited about this opportunity and for this team to make the playoffs," Beckham added in Peavy's Southern Drawl accent.

Peavy currently sits in second place of the American League Final Vote, trailing Texas Rangers pitcher Yu Darvish.

St. Louis Cardinals third baseman David Freese leads the National League voting.

Report: Talks surrounding Chris Sale intensifying between White Sox, Nationals

Report: Talks surrounding Chris Sale intensifying between White Sox, Nationals

The White Sox haven't wavered on their asking price for Chris Sale, and their patience may be paying off.

According to FOX's Ken Rosenthal, trade talks surrounding Sale are intensifying between the White Sox and Nationals that would likely include Washington's two top prospects in RHP Lucas Giolito and OF Victor Robles.

Despite the trade chatter heating up, a source told CSN's Chuck Garfien that the White Sox aren't close to a deal and continue to talk with other teams regarding the White Sox ace.

In an exclusive interview with CSN earlier on Monday, White Sox chairman Jerry Reinsdorf said trading Sale would be 'very hard' on multiple levels, particularly being satisfied with the package coming back.

Perhaps it's only a matter a time before Sale gets traded, but the White Sox have made it clear they won't make a deal unless they're maximizing their return.

Despite Chris Sale rumors, White Sox say they have contingencies in place for a rebuild

Despite Chris Sale rumors, White Sox say they have contingencies in place for a rebuild

NATIONAL HARBOR, Md. — Though the majority of reports Monday suggested Chris Sale would be the first piece to go in a potential rebuild, the White Sox say they have many contingencies.

The five-time All-Star pitcher was one of the hottest topics on the rumor mill at the first day of the Winter Meetings on Monday and figures to be all week. Tied to numerous teams either vying for his services or reportedly dropping out because of chairman Jerry Reinsdorf’s high-asking price of four can’t-miss prospects, the pursuit of Sale already has been established as one of the offseason’s top stories to follow. But general manager Rick Hahn — whose phone has constantly been recharging after what he describes as an “interesting few weeks” — said the White Sox aren’t limited to one major move to get their offseason underway. As long as someone pays up, the White Sox could deal any one of several players from a top-heavy and talented roster.

“What we are looking to do is deals that put ourselves in the strongest position possible for the long term and there’s no need for Player X to move before Player Y if we get to the right price point on any given deal,” Hahn said.

Hahn continued to make it perfectly clear Monday that the White Sox are interested in long-term moves. The days of quick fixes appear to be over with the hope being that a dramatic paradigm shift could one day prevent the franchise from enduring another eight-year long playoff drought.

The White Sox want to one day be able to provide sound replacements from within their own farm system, something Hahn has preached for years, but hasn’t yet been able to attain. Hahn said he’s encouraged about the potential returns from other teams and the prospect of reloading a thin farm system by trading several of the talented pieces from his roster.

But by no means would the direction the White Sox take be held up by one trade in particular. Given the White Sox have few bad contracts on the books, the team isn’t at a disadvantage of being in a position where it must trade Sale or Jose Quintana. If the White Sox deal either one of their All-Star pitchers or Todd Frazier, Melky Cabrera, Adam Eaton or anyone else, it would only be after they feel their price has been met.

“I think what we are looking to do is put ourselves in a position for extended success,” Hahn said. “The means for us to do that is by acquiring as much impact, controllable talent as we can over an extended period and continuing the efforts to build us up internationally and through the draft and adding to that potentially via trade.

“It’s not something that’s necessarily going to happen over night. It’s not something that I would expect to be completed while we are here in its entirety. It’s going to be a process potentially that takes some time. …

“We have alternatives in mind and alternative routes for putting the club together. We are pretty confident about what we want to try to accomplish and how that’s going to unfold. …

“We don’t want to be caught in between. But again, we’re not going to force that seven things have to get done or it’s not worth doing one. It’s a process.”