The best White Sox All-Star Game performances

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The best White Sox All-Star Game performances

It's been 79 years since the first MLB All-Star Game was held at old Comiskey Park on July 6, 1933. Since then, there have been 142 appearances by a White Sox player in the midsummer classic. Below are a few of the best performances:

Position players:

Al Simmons (1934): 3-5, 2 2B, 1 RBI, 3 R

The only White Sox player to ever record three hits in an All-Star Game, Simmons batted sixth in the second-ever All-Star Game behind Babe Ruth, Lou Gehrig and Jimmie Foxx -- and had as many hits as those three combined. Only Earl Averill had a more positive impact on the American League's 9-7 win, as the Indians Hall of Famer tripled and drove in three.

Paul Konerko (2002): 2-2, 2 2B, 2 RBI

Playing in his first All-Star Game, Konerko built a legitimate MVP case -- except that award wasn't handed out in the infamous 7-7 tie at Miller Park. Konerko replaced starter Jason Giambi in the fourth and hit a ground-rule double, then drove in a pair of runs on his second double, coming off Diamondbacks reliever Byung-Hyun Kim. Konerko's .433 WPA was not only the highest in the game, but it represented the most positive impact a White Sox player has ever had on an All-Star Game.

Nellie Fox (1954): 1-2, 2 RBI

A two-out, two-run single by Fox broke a 9-9 tie in the top of the ninth in Cleveland, netting the American League an 11-9 victory. The single by Fox brought home a pair of legendary Yankees -- Mickey Mantle and Yogi Berra. Of note: Not surprisingly, Fox has the most two-hit All-Star Games of any White Sox player, accomplishing that feat four times. Konerko, Minnie Minoso and Al Simmons have multiple hits multiple times in a midsummer classic.

Frank Thomas (1995): 1-2, HR, 2 RBI

Thomas provided all the runs for the American League in '95, with his fourth-inning two-run homer off John Smiley bringing home Cleveland's Carlos Baerga. He's only one of two White Sox players to ever homer in an All-Star Game along with Magglio Ordonez, who blasted a solo homer off Jon Lieber in the 2001 contest at Safeco Field.

Pitchers:

Gary Peters (1967): 3 IP, 0 H, 0 ER, 4 K, 0 BB

Peters struck out Willie Mays, Roberto Clemente, Orlando Cepeda and Dick Allen. He also got Hank Aaron to ground out. That's, well, pretty successful.

Billy Pierce (1955): 3 IP, 1 H, 0 ER, 3 K, 0 BB

A White Sox pitcher started four All-Star Games in the 1950s, with Pierce starting three including 1955's contest. After allowing a leadoff single to St. Louis' Red Schoendienst, Pierce retired the next nine batters, including Duke Snider and Ernie Banks on strikes. No. 19 also holds the record for most strikeouts by a Sox player in an All-Star Game with five, which came in 1956.

Mark Buehrle (2005): 2 IP, 3 H, 0 ER, 3 K, 0 BB

Pitching the best season of his career, Buehrle started the '05 game in Detroit and struck out Derrek Lee, Mike Piazza and Jeff Kent. He quickly erased a leadoff single to Bobby Abreu by getting Carlos Beltran to ground into a double play. An interesting note: Six times has a White Sox pitcher started an All-Star Game, and all have come in either the 1950s or 2000s.

Esteban Loaiza (2003): 2 IP, 1 H, 0 ER, 1 K, 0 BB

Statistically, Loaiza's performance doesn't stand out against other Sox All-Star hurlers, but that he started the 2003 game at U.S. Cellular Field was pretty neat.

Carlos Rodon sets White Sox, AL record with seven straight strikeouts to open game

Carlos Rodon sets White Sox, AL record with seven straight strikeouts to open game

White Sox pitcher Carlos Rodon tied an American League and a team record when he started Friday night’s contest with seven consecutive strikeouts against the Minnesota Twins.

Rodon, who struck out 11 in his previous turn on Sunday, matched the mark set by White Sox hurler Joe Cowley on May 28, 1986 in a loss at the Texas Rangers.

Of Rodon’s seven strikeouts, two were on called third strikes by plate umpire Tripp Gibson. Twins outfielder Logan Schafer snapped the streak with a one-out double in the top of the third inning.

Houston’s Jim Deshaies (1986) and the New York Mets’ Jacob de Grom (2014) hold the major league record with eight straight strikeouts to start a game.

[SHOP: Gear up, White Sox fans!]

Doug Fister set the AL record with nine consecutive strikeouts in 2012 and Tom Seaver holds the MLB record with 10 straight in 1970.

Combined with Sunday’s start, when he struck out the side in the eighth at the Cleveland Indians, Rodon whiffed 10 straight batters. Rodon’s run is the longest consecutive strikeout streak in the majors since Los Angeles Dodgers reliever Eric Gagne struck out 10 in a row in May 2003.

White Sox infielder Tyler Saladino sidelined by herniated disc

White Sox infielder Tyler Saladino sidelined by herniated disc

Tyler Saladino has reached the point where it’s significantly easier for him to find comfortable positions for his herniated disc.

The White Sox infielder joked on Friday that his dugout seat was cozy enough that he might just idle for a few days. But before he returned home earlier this week and received an epidural, the second-year player experienced several days of excruciating pain.

Saladino — who won’t play again this season — said he received the shot on Monday and it has helped immensely with a problem he has experienced occasionally this season, this instance being the most painful.

“It was kind of crippling for a little bit,” Saladino said. “Those first few days, I really was out of commission. I kind of was just trying to find a comfortable spot and stay there. Standing up, it would catch. It was pretty painful. That’s how I know it was a little bit more. That’s why I went and got that shot to try to let the medicine get there right away. It has been working and helping a lot.”

[SHOP: Gear up, White Sox fans!]

Saladino’s stay in Chicago is open-ended until he feels good enough to fly back to San Diego for the offseason. He’s set for another doctor appointment soon and is optimistic based on this week’s improvement. Saladino, who is hitting .282/.315/.409 with eight home runs and 38 RBIs, hasn’t played since Sept. 21. He injured himself two days later in Cleveland before the Sept. 23 contest and hasn’t been right since.

The injury has provided a disappointing end to an enjoyable season in which Saladino showed improvement at the plate (his OPS is up 122 points from 2015).

“It was a lot of fun to be out there with the guys,” Saladino said. “The whole season was a roller coaster for everybody around here. The whole approach we’ve had all year of grinding every game was its own. They’re still doing a really good job right now. Kind of stinks to not, I don’t care, as long as I can play and even pinch run I would be stoked to be with the guys. But at this point, the back thing, you have to take care of it.”