The best White Sox All-Star Game performances

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The best White Sox All-Star Game performances

It's been 79 years since the first MLB All-Star Game was held at old Comiskey Park on July 6, 1933. Since then, there have been 142 appearances by a White Sox player in the midsummer classic. Below are a few of the best performances:

Position players:

Al Simmons (1934): 3-5, 2 2B, 1 RBI, 3 R

The only White Sox player to ever record three hits in an All-Star Game, Simmons batted sixth in the second-ever All-Star Game behind Babe Ruth, Lou Gehrig and Jimmie Foxx -- and had as many hits as those three combined. Only Earl Averill had a more positive impact on the American League's 9-7 win, as the Indians Hall of Famer tripled and drove in three.

Paul Konerko (2002): 2-2, 2 2B, 2 RBI

Playing in his first All-Star Game, Konerko built a legitimate MVP case -- except that award wasn't handed out in the infamous 7-7 tie at Miller Park. Konerko replaced starter Jason Giambi in the fourth and hit a ground-rule double, then drove in a pair of runs on his second double, coming off Diamondbacks reliever Byung-Hyun Kim. Konerko's .433 WPA was not only the highest in the game, but it represented the most positive impact a White Sox player has ever had on an All-Star Game.

Nellie Fox (1954): 1-2, 2 RBI

A two-out, two-run single by Fox broke a 9-9 tie in the top of the ninth in Cleveland, netting the American League an 11-9 victory. The single by Fox brought home a pair of legendary Yankees -- Mickey Mantle and Yogi Berra. Of note: Not surprisingly, Fox has the most two-hit All-Star Games of any White Sox player, accomplishing that feat four times. Konerko, Minnie Minoso and Al Simmons have multiple hits multiple times in a midsummer classic.

Frank Thomas (1995): 1-2, HR, 2 RBI

Thomas provided all the runs for the American League in '95, with his fourth-inning two-run homer off John Smiley bringing home Cleveland's Carlos Baerga. He's only one of two White Sox players to ever homer in an All-Star Game along with Magglio Ordonez, who blasted a solo homer off Jon Lieber in the 2001 contest at Safeco Field.

Pitchers:

Gary Peters (1967): 3 IP, 0 H, 0 ER, 4 K, 0 BB

Peters struck out Willie Mays, Roberto Clemente, Orlando Cepeda and Dick Allen. He also got Hank Aaron to ground out. That's, well, pretty successful.

Billy Pierce (1955): 3 IP, 1 H, 0 ER, 3 K, 0 BB

A White Sox pitcher started four All-Star Games in the 1950s, with Pierce starting three including 1955's contest. After allowing a leadoff single to St. Louis' Red Schoendienst, Pierce retired the next nine batters, including Duke Snider and Ernie Banks on strikes. No. 19 also holds the record for most strikeouts by a Sox player in an All-Star Game with five, which came in 1956.

Mark Buehrle (2005): 2 IP, 3 H, 0 ER, 3 K, 0 BB

Pitching the best season of his career, Buehrle started the '05 game in Detroit and struck out Derrek Lee, Mike Piazza and Jeff Kent. He quickly erased a leadoff single to Bobby Abreu by getting Carlos Beltran to ground into a double play. An interesting note: Six times has a White Sox pitcher started an All-Star Game, and all have come in either the 1950s or 2000s.

Esteban Loaiza (2003): 2 IP, 1 H, 0 ER, 1 K, 0 BB

Statistically, Loaiza's performance doesn't stand out against other Sox All-Star hurlers, but that he started the 2003 game at U.S. Cellular Field was pretty neat.

Preview: Jose Quintana, White Sox continue series with Mariners tonight on CSN

Preview: Jose Quintana, White Sox continue series with Mariners tonight on CSN

The White Sox continue their series against the Seattle Mariners, and you can catch all the action on CSN. Coverage begins with White Sox Pregame Live at 5:30 p.m. Be sure to stick around after the final out to get analysis and player reaction on White Sox Postgame Live.

Tonight’s starting pitching matchup: Jose Quintana (10-9, 2.84 ERA) vs. Ariel Miranda (1-0, 5.49 ERA)

Click here for a game preview to make sure you’re ready for the action.  

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— Latest on the White Sox: All of the most recent news and notes.

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Chris Sale strikes out 14 but White Sox fall to Mariners

Chris Sale strikes out 14 but White Sox fall to Mariners

Felix Hernandez has proven for years that he doesn’t need much help.

But the White Sox provided him with three free outs on the bases anyway on Friday night.

Those mistakes allowed Hernandez to hold the White Sox in check as they wasted a 14-strikeout performance from Chris Sale in a 3-1 loss to the Seattle Mariners in front of 25,651 at U.S. Cellular Field. Sale retired 16 in a row to end it, but it wasn’t enough as the White Sox dropped back to five games below .500.

“We didn’t run the bases very well tonight,” White Sox manager Robin Ventura said. “That ends up costing you. You’re getting something going against them, and it just takes the wind out of your sails. Both guys pitched great.

“They just executed better than we did when they got the chance. Both guys were going strong. The way we ran the bases, we didn’t deserve to win that game.”

Sale (15-7) deserved much better than to lose for the fifth time in his last six decisions.

[MORE: White Sox trade catcher Dioner Navarro to Blue Jays]

Though he allowed a run in the second, third and fourth innings, Sale got on a roll late.

After Adam Lind’s two-out RBI double in the fourth, Sale found an extra gear and retired the last 16 Mariners to hit, including 10 strikeouts. He struck out the side in the sixth and seventh innings and afforded his teammates a chance to rally.

“Thank God we did it early because as everybody saw, when he gets on a roll it’s like lights out,” Seattle manager Scott Servais said. “He’s obviously one of the best pitchers in the league for a reason. We had no chance, really, after the fourth and fifth inning. He got into a groove and got all his pitches working.”

Two of Seattle’s three runs off Sale came on opposite-field drives as Lind doubled to left in the fourth and Franklin Gutierrez homered to right in the second inning. Sale walked none and only allowed five hits and three runs in nine innings. He threw strikes on 88 of 120 pitches.

It was the 13th complete game of Sale’s career and his fifth this season.

“I wanted to find a groove and I felt like after the fourth inning I got into a pretty good groove, that cruising speed I was talking about,” Sale said. “I just tried to lengthen it as much as I could, just fill up as many innings as I could. Just give us a chance to win, keep us in the game.”

While Sale kept his team in the game, they repeatedly took themselves out of it.

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The White Sox had plenty of chances against Hernandez, none better than the bottom of the eighth inning. Trailing by two runs, Avisail Garcia and Tyler Saladino singled on both sides of a J.B. Shuck fielder’s choice. Adam Eaton’s one-out walk knocked Hernandez out of the game after 104 pitches.

But closer Edwin Diaz got Tim Anderson to hit into a fielder’s choice as third baseman Shawn O’Malley made a perfect throw home on the slow roller for a force out. Jose Abreu then fouled out to leave the bases loaded. Diaz retired the side in order in the ninth for his 11th save.

Todd Frazier homered in the seventh inning of Hernandez for the team’s only run, but they should have had more. The White Sox had the leadoff man reach base in five of eight innings started by Hernandez, who allowed a run and eight hits in 7 1/3 innings. Hernandez erased two of those five as he picked off Frazier and Shuck in the second and third innings. He also got out of a first-and-third jam in the fifth inning when Shuck lined into a double play and Omar Narvaez was caught leaning.

“That’s the frustrating part,” Ventura said. “You know you’re not really going to have too many opportunities (against Hernandez). You might be able to hit and run or all of a sudden you’re first and third. But if you just take it out of your own hands, that’s where you scratch your head.”

White Sox hope second-rounder Alec Hansen's 'fun ride' continues at Kannapolis

White Sox hope second-rounder Alec Hansen's 'fun ride' continues at Kannapolis

The way he dominated the Pioneer League had to boost to Alec Hansen’s confidence. It also prompted his promotion.

When the White Sox sent their second-round pick to Great Falls last month it was in the hope he could rebound from a rough junior season at Oklahoma that caused his draft stock to fall. Once thought to be the potential first overall pick of the 2016 draft, Hansen was selected 49th after he posted a 5.40 ERA and walked 39 batters in 51.2 innings. But Hansen — who made his first start at Single-A Kannapolis on Friday — looked every bit the first-rounder at Great Falls with a 1.23 ERA and 59 strikeouts in 36.2 innings.

“We wanted to put him in a position where there was a little less pressure to start off the season,” White Sox player development director Nick Capra said. “There's always pressure, but it's a little less magnified in the Pioneer League. We wanted to get him on the right road. We did a couple things with him mechanically and he took off with it.”

“We kind of held him hostage in Great Falls a little bit too long. He’s been really good. He’s double-digit strikeouts every night. He’s not walking people.”

Hansen is expected to make two starts at Kannapolis before the team’s season ends. He earned a no decision after he allowed three earned runs and five hits with two walks and six strikeouts in five innings against the Columbia Fireflies on Friday.

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Capra described the mechanical changes the White Sox made with Hansen as minor. Essentially, they want Hansen to take advantage of his 6-foot-8 frame and stay taller and release the ball more quickly. They believe it will help him better command his pitches.

Through 11 minor-league starts, Hansen has walked 18 batters in 49 innings (he also pitched seven innings in Arizona). That’s compared with the 96 batters he walked in 145 innings in college.

“Our player development guys deserve so much credit for the way they've handled it,” amateur scouting director Nick Hostetler said. “There was a little bit of concern about the confidence part of it, just him taking the ball every fifth day and knowing that we believe in him. Our pitching guys and PD guys deserve a huge amount of credit for just the time they put into it. They really, really know how to make these guys excel and succeed. Been a pretty fun ride to watch and I hope it continues.”