Buehrle: 'I was lied to'


Buehrle: 'I was lied to'

The Marlins and Blue Jays turned the baseball world upside down last week with the megadeal that sent a slew of veterans north of the border just one year after they were signed in South Beach.

And one player is not too happy about how things went down.

Former White Sox ace Mark Buehrle, who signed a four-year deal prior to the 2012 season, let his frustrations fly Wednesday.

"I'm upset with how things turned out in Miami," Buehrle said in a joint statement with his agent, Jeff Berry, according to the Sun Sentinel. "Just like the fans in South Florida, I was lied to on multiple occasions. But I'm putting it behind me and looking forward to moving on with my career."

The Marlins inked Buehrle, shortstop Jose Reyes and closer Heath Bell to lucrative, back-loaded deals in free agency last winter and now all three players are gone after just one season. Manager Ozzie Guillen also lasted only one year, having been fired in late October.

Guillen was a driving force in Buehrle signing with Miami, as the veteran pitcher was famously intent on joining a team only if the geographic location matched his and his family's interest. Now, Buehrle has no choice, given that his contract with the Marlins included a no-trade clause.

"Throughout the recruiting process, the Marlins made repeated assurances about their long-term commitment to Mark and his family and their long-term commitment to building a winning tradition of Marlins baseball in the new stadium," Berry said in the statement. "This was demonstrated by their already completed signings of Ozzie, Heath Bell and Jose Reyes.

"At the same time, given the Marlins' history, we were all certainly aware of and voiced concern about the lack of no-trade protection. This is unquestionably a business, and signing with the Marlins was a calculated risk. Mark held up his end of the bargain; unfortunately the same can't be said of the Marlins."

Buehrle's deal was worth 58 million over the four years, but the Marlins ended up paying him just 14.5 million for one year, while the Blue Jays are now on the hook for the remainder of that salary. Reyes was due 106 million over six years and Bell was owed 27 million over three years.

While the Blue Jays made the move in an attempt to challenge the Yankees and Rays in the competitive AL East, a big reason why the Marlins made the deal was to shed the lofty salaries owed to Buehrle, Reyes and Josh Johnson.

Given how things turned out this offseason -- Bell was also traded on Oct. 20 -- how will the Marlins ever convince a veteran free agent to sign a long-term deal with them in the near future?

White Sox Talk Podcast: National media fails to recognize White Sox as 2005 champs


White Sox Talk Podcast: National media fails to recognize White Sox as 2005 champs

Chuck Garfien, Slavko Bekovic and Chris Kamka react to the national media blunders that failed to recognize the White Sox as 2005 World Series champions. 

Later, the guys discuss Jerry Reinsdorf's comments about cheering for the Cubs and break down what it takes to beat the Indians. 

Check out the latest edition of the White Sox Talk Podcast below: 

White Sox: Chris Getz's new player development role is to carry out 'vision of the scouts'

White Sox: Chris Getz's new player development role is to carry out 'vision of the scouts'

He may be limited on experience, but Chris Getz already has a strong idea about player development.

Getz -- who on Friday was named the White Sox director of player development -- worked the past two seasons as an assistant to baseball operations in player development for the Kansas City Royals. A fourth-round pick of the White Sox in the 2005 amateur draft, Getz replaces Nick Capra, who earlier this month was named the team’s third-base coach. A quick learner whom a baseball source said the Royals hoped to retain, Getz described his new position as being “very task oriented.”

“(The job) is carrying out the vision of the scouts,” Getz said. “The players identified by the scouts and then they are brought in and it’s a commitment by both the player and staff members to create an environment for that player to reach their ceiling.

“It’s a daily process.”

Getz, a University of Michigan product, played for the White Sox in 2008 and 2009 before he was traded to the Royals in a package for Mark Teahen in 2010. Previously drafted by the White Sox in 2002, he described the organization as “something that always will be in my DNA.”

[SHOP: Gear up, White Sox fans!]​

Getz stayed in Kansas City through 2013 and began to consider a front-office career as his playing career wound down. His final season in the majors was with the Toronto Blue Jays in 2014.

Royals general manager Dayton Moore hired Getz as an assistant to baseball operations in January 2015 and he quickly developed a reputation as both highly intelligent and likeable, according to a club source.

“He is extremely well-regarded throughout the game, and we believe he is going to have a positive impact on the quality of play from rookie ball through Chicago,” GM Rick Hahn said.

Getz had as many as four assistant GMs ahead of him with the Royals, who couldn’t offer the same kind of position as the White Sox did. Getz spent the past week meeting with other members of the White Sox player development staff and soon will head to the team’s Dominican Republic academy. After that he’ll head to the Arizona Fall League as he becomes familiar with the department. Though he’s still relatively new, Getz knows what’s expected of his position.

“It’s focused on what’s in front of you,” Getz said. “Player development people are trying to get the player better every single day.”

“With that being said, the staff members need to be creative in their thinking. They need to be innovative at times. They need to know when to press the gas or pump the brakes. They need to be versatile in all these different areas.”