Buehrle lands out of his comfort zone in Toronto

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Buehrle lands out of his comfort zone in Toronto

There's been plenty of words written about the not-yet-official megadeal that shipped 20 percent of the Miami Marlins to Toronto for Yunel Escobar, Jeff Mathis and a handful of prospects, with Hardball Talk's Craig Calcaterra and Yahoo's Jeff Passan offering scathing skewerings of Jeffery Loria, David Samson and Miami's ownership. Both are excellent reads, and delve into a problem much larger than the one that may be facing Mark Buehrle as he readies for three years north of the border.

From a personal standpoint, there's already one problem with Buehrle being shipped to Toronto. The Canadian province of Ontario doesn't allow pit bulls, and Buehrle and his family own a two-year-old of which they're fond. There was an easy solution to getting around the Dade County (where Miami is located) ban on pit bulls -- move to Broward county, just north of Miami.

That's just one area, though, where Buehrle will be out of his comfort zone. Jim Margalus at South Side Sox looked at that topic, and noted Buehrle has a 4.35 career ERA against the AL East opponents he'll face on a more consistent basis through 2015. But the larger point Jim makes is that Buehrle has never really pitched out of his comfort zone in the majors -- when he went to Miami, he stayed with the same manager he had since 2004.

Toronto is an unknown, a destination he didn't consider in free agency last year. Instead, he signed with Miami and turned in a typical Mark Buehrle year -- 3.74 ERA, 31 starts, 202 13 innings.

Buehrle, though, has beaten the odds ever since he was cut from his high school team in suburban St. Louis. We'll see if he can continue to beat the odds in Toronto.

Jim Thome to have highway named after him in Peoria

Jim Thome to have highway named after him in Peoria

Jim Thome's name is very well-known around the baseball world, and rightfully so. 

The former White Sox slugger hit 612 home runs during his 22-year major-league career, but is equally known for being an all-around good guy.

Perhaps Thome's name is most popular in his hometown of Peoria, IL. 

Some people get a street named after them in their hometown after achieving fame. Not Jim Thome. Jim Thome gets a highway named after him.

The Peoria Journal Star reported that a portion of the Route 24 roadway at the Louisville Slugger Sports Complex will be named after Thome.

Thome's portion of Route 24 will be coined 'Jim Thome Expressway.' The aforementioned section will extend from Adams Street in Bartonville to Griswold Street in Peoria.

Thome is currently serving in the White Sox front office as the Special Assistant to the Senior VP/General Manager.

White Sox draftees one win away from College World Series title

White Sox draftees one win away from College World Series title

The White Sox are going to have to wait a little longer for two members of their 2016 MLB Draft class to join their farm system.

Coastal Carolina closer Mike Morrison (27th round) and third baseman Zach Remillard (10th round) have played a major role in the Chanticleers magical postseason run which has them one win away from a College World Series championship after Tuesday's thrilling 5-4 win against Arizona.

With a depleted pitching staff, Coastal Carolina head coach Gary Gilmore turned to his senior closer to make just his third career college start in an effort to even the best-of-three series at 1-1.

Gilmore's decision paid off.

Morrison tossed a career-high 103 pitches on the biggest stage of his career, limiting Arizona to just two runs while matching a College World Series finals record with 10 strikeouts. Morrison was pulled after just 6 2/3 innings. Although he didn't get the victory, Morrison gave Coastal Carolina the quality start they needed.

Before exiting the mound, a teary-eyed Morrison embraced pitching coach Drew Thomas and reliever Bobby Holmes, then walked to the dugout to a standing ovation from the 24,716 in attendance.

“I put my heart and soul into this program for four years, man, and to end it like that, I mean, that was special,” Morrison said via Josh Planos of  KETV.com. “That standing ovation was probably the coolest things that’s ever going to happen in my entire life.”

Morrison presumably finishes his season with a record of 8-1 and a 1.50 ERA with 94 strikeouts in 72 innings.

While Morrison will be watching the winner-take-all Game 3 from the sidelines, Remillard, who scored the game-winning run Tuesday night, will try to ignite the Chanticleers offense batting out of the cleanup spot.

After undergoing Tommy John surgery in 2014, Remillard has rebounded into one of the nation's premier hitters — he's no slouch with the glove either. The New York native has a slash line of .345/.392/.617 with 19 homers and 72 RBI this season.

As the soon-to-be White Sox aim to bring some hardware back home, their former teammate and current White Sox prospect will be cheering them on from Charlotte.

White Sox offense struggles in front of Quintana in shutout loss to Twins

White Sox offense struggles in front of Quintana in shutout loss to Twins

The White Sox haven’t had many big hits in their last dozen games.

The White Sox never seem to deliver any timely knocks in Jose Quintana starts.

Those two forces collided in a 4-0 loss to the Minnesota Twins on Tuesday night in front of 22,072 at U.S. Cellular Field.

Quintana allowed two Brian Dozier home runs, including a decisive three-run shot in the sixth inning, and dropped a seventh straight decision. His offense finished 0-for-8 with runners in scoring position as Kyle Gibson twirled seven scoreless innings.

Outfielder Melky Cabrera also left the game early with a sore left wrist.

“We didn’t do nothing as hitters,” third baseman Todd Frazier said. “We have to find a way. We had an off day. Everybody was nice and relaxed coming back. We’re professionals here as hitters. We have to find ways to get guys in.”

The White Sox didn’t have many shots against Gibson.

They butchered those that they did.

No opportunity was bigger than the third inning, which began with singles by J.B. Shuck and Tim Anderson in front of the team’s 2-3-4 hitters. But Gibson delivered and the White Sox failed yet again.

Down 1-0, Adam Eaton couldn’t move the runners over as he flew out to center. Jose Abreu followed suit and flew out to center before Cabrera — who left in the top of the seventh and is listed as day-to-day — popped out to second.

One inning earlier, Brett Lawrie was stranded in scoring position when Gibson got Avisail Garcia to chase a two-strike pitch off the plate and in the dirt. It was more of the same in the fifth when Eaton flew out to center with a man on second. And again in the seventh when Shuck flew out and Anderson grounded into a fielder’s choice with two aboard.

“It started out well,” manager Robin Ventura said. “You get them on there. Any time we seemed to get something going against Gibson, he just really started going soft and using your aggressiveness against you. I think that's part of what played into it. He had a very good changeup, he used his curve when he had to. He went a little bit backwards. Any time we got into an aggressive count, he just took a little off. We couldn't get anything going against him.”

The team’s effort was the continuance of a nasty trend.

The White Sox are 12-for-98 (.122) with runners in scoring position in their last 12 games. The lengthy slump dropped them from hitting a formidable .260 with RISP, which ranked in the top half of the league, to below .240, which ranks in the bottom third.

That the performance arrived with Quintana on the mound should come as no surprise.

Whereas the White Sox scored 25 runs in Quintana’s first seven starts, they’ve relapsed into their old non-scoring selves whenever he takes the hill. Over his last nine starts, Quintana has had nine runs of support.

The left-hander said the lack of support isn’t something he focuses on because it’s out of his hands.

“I don’t have control on the runs,” Quintana said. “I say the same every time. But I don’t have control, man. I try to keep going. I try to be better next time and keep going. Next time be better out there, better outing and better everything.

“I never think about that. I just try to pay attention and do my job, focusing on throwing the ball well and that’s it.”

Quintana made two mistakes in seven otherwise solid innings.

Dozier’s solo homer to leadoff the second inning gave the Twins, who improved to 25-51, a one-run lead.

Eduardo Nunez then led off the sixth inning with a single and stole second base. He advanced to third on a passed ball. Quintana then walked Joe Mauer and Dozier made him pay when he got enough of a 2-1 curveball low and in to drive it out for a three-run homer and a 4-0 lead.

Quintana — who is 5-8 despite a 3.18 ERA — allowed six hits, walked one and struck out eight.

“I’m sure inside he’s frustrated,” Frazier said. “I would be too. He’s a competitor, gives it his all. One bad pitch.”