To Cooper's delight, Sox aren't horsebleep


To Cooper's delight, Sox aren't horsebleep

Everyone saw the predictions. Sports Illustrated had the White Sox pegged for 95 losses. Others projected an uninspiring finish in the American League Central, with the Sox maybe, just maybe, scraping .500.

White Sox pitching coach Don Cooper knows the predictions. He also knows the Sox currently sit in first place.

"If I'm not mistaken, I think that all of you guys had us picked to be horsebleep," Cooper bristled to the assembled media in the Sox dugout prior to Saturday's game. "And we haven't come to that yet. There's a lot of good things going on."

Not everything is rosy for the Sox, though, who have lost four of their last six games since a nine-game winning streak came to an end a week ago. Third base remains an issue while Gavin Floyd and Philip Humber have struggled to keep their ERAs from climbing. But Cooper isn't having any of that negativity.

"We have two guys that we are trying to bring out of their inconsistency to more consistency," Cooper said of Floyd and Humber. "Weve seen them good before and we know what it looks like.

"With that being said, everyone likes to pick out our issues or our weak points or things we need to improve. We are well aware of them, first of all. Thanks to everyone for telling us. We are well aware of everything that is going on. Heres some news too: There are 30 other clubs and they all have issues too. We are not sitting and lamenting our inconsistency. We are trying actively to get it better. Thats all you can do."

While the Sox are trying to get Floyd and Humber back on track, they've successfully replaced their 65-million man with an unheralded Colombian rookie. With John Danks on the disabled list, Jose Quintana has posted a 2.05 ERA in 22 innings.

"He's going out there and he's making his way in the major leagues. I mean, this is stuff that's great to watch," reveled Cooper. "To see a kid go out there for the first time, get his first win, pitching well, trying to live his dream. That's good, that's not bad. I'm having a lot of fun watching the younger guys to tell you the truth."

Along with Quintana, Nate Jones, Addison Reed and Chris Sale have provided Cooper with that enjoyment. Sale has been especially good, as entering his start Saturday he led the American League with a 2.30 ERA.

"Listen, he was one of the baddest ass lefty relievers in the league, I know that," Cooper said. "Now we're trying to give him the chance to be one of the top-flight starters. He's on his way."

But Sale hasn't thrown over 100 innings in two years, when he tossed 136 23 innings between Florida Gulf Coast, the minor leagues and the White Sox. With a quality start today, Sale will surpass his 2011 innings total.

Cooper doesn't know if the Sox will impose an innings limit on Sale, instead choosing to play things by ear and do everything possible to get Sale as much rest as he needs.

We're certainly determining everything as we go," Cooper said. We already skipped him a start earlier when he moved to the bullpen. He's getting extra days now. Believe me, everything we can do to keep him healthy and strong and keep him going out there and doing what he's doing, it's getting taken care of."

The Sox haven't played their 60th game of the season yet. It's still early, and while the team is in first, there still are concerns that need to be addressed going forward. But Cooper is determined to not focus on the negative any more than he has to.

"For me it's a pet peeve, I guess," Cooper said of that negativity. "A lot of people like to moan, complain and cry about 'what's this guy not doing? What's this guy not doing?' Hey man, look what's happening here. We don't sit and cry and moan. There's no crying and moaning in baseball. You just got to keep going. And that's a good attribute of our club. Regardless of what happens yesterday, we come back ready to play today."

White Sox Talk Podcast: National media fails to recognize White Sox as 2005 champs


White Sox Talk Podcast: National media fails to recognize White Sox as 2005 champs

Chuck Garfien, Slavko Bekovic and Chris Kamka react to the national media blunders that failed to recognize the White Sox as 2005 World Series champions. 

Later, the guys discuss Jerry Reinsdorf's comments about cheering for the Cubs and break down what it takes to beat the Indians. 

Check out the latest edition of the White Sox Talk Podcast below: 

White Sox: Chris Getz's new player development role is to carry out 'vision of the scouts'

White Sox: Chris Getz's new player development role is to carry out 'vision of the scouts'

He may be limited on experience, but Chris Getz already has a strong idea about player development.

Getz -- who on Friday was named the White Sox director of player development -- worked the past two seasons as an assistant to baseball operations in player development for the Kansas City Royals. A fourth-round pick of the White Sox in the 2005 amateur draft, Getz replaces Nick Capra, who earlier this month was named the team’s third-base coach. A quick learner whom a baseball source said the Royals hoped to retain, Getz described his new position as being “very task oriented.”

“(The job) is carrying out the vision of the scouts,” Getz said. “The players identified by the scouts and then they are brought in and it’s a commitment by both the player and staff members to create an environment for that player to reach their ceiling.

“It’s a daily process.”

Getz, a University of Michigan product, played for the White Sox in 2008 and 2009 before he was traded to the Royals in a package for Mark Teahen in 2010. Previously drafted by the White Sox in 2002, he described the organization as “something that always will be in my DNA.”

[SHOP: Gear up, White Sox fans!]​

Getz stayed in Kansas City through 2013 and began to consider a front-office career as his playing career wound down. His final season in the majors was with the Toronto Blue Jays in 2014.

Royals general manager Dayton Moore hired Getz as an assistant to baseball operations in January 2015 and he quickly developed a reputation as both highly intelligent and likeable, according to a club source.

“He is extremely well-regarded throughout the game, and we believe he is going to have a positive impact on the quality of play from rookie ball through Chicago,” GM Rick Hahn said.

Getz had as many as four assistant GMs ahead of him with the Royals, who couldn’t offer the same kind of position as the White Sox did. Getz spent the past week meeting with other members of the White Sox player development staff and soon will head to the team’s Dominican Republic academy. After that he’ll head to the Arizona Fall League as he becomes familiar with the department. Though he’s still relatively new, Getz knows what’s expected of his position.

“It’s focused on what’s in front of you,” Getz said. “Player development people are trying to get the player better every single day.”

“With that being said, the staff members need to be creative in their thinking. They need to be innovative at times. They need to know when to press the gas or pump the brakes. They need to be versatile in all these different areas.”