Danks' new deal has no-trade clause

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Danks' new deal has no-trade clause

Some people may be under the notion the Sox are still rebuilding and the John Danks extension just makes him easier to trade since a guy with five years on a reasonable contract is more attractive than a guy who will become a free agent at season's end.

That's not the case.

MLB.com's White Sox beat writer Scott Merkin sheds more light on the deal:

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Scott MerkinMLB.com has learned Danks has full no-trade in first year of deal, limited no-trade over next four years. More to come.
Dec 29 via webFavoriteRetweetReply

So if the Sox wanted to deal the 26-year-old starter, they would need him to waive this no-trade clause.

Or they just don't deal him and use him as a cornerstone in the rotation to build around. Either way, that still fits with trying to make the team better for the future.

Chris Sale's win streak snapped at nine as White Sox fall to Tribe

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Chris Sale's win streak snapped at nine as White Sox fall to Tribe

Chris Sale’s bid to win his first 10 starts of the season ended in spectacular fashion on Tuesday night.

The White Sox pitcher endured the longest inning of his career and then some as the Cleveland Indians gave him an early exit and the White Sox never recovered, losing 6-2 at U.S. Cellular Field in front of 21,550. Cruising through two-plus innings, Sale needed 43 pitches to escape the third inning and allowed six earned runs in 3.1 frame. Vying to become only the eighth pitcher in baseball history to win his first 10 starts, and just the second since 1920, Sale was tagged with his first loss. His earned-run average rose from 1.58 to 2.26 in the process.

The White Sox have lost 10 of their last 14 games.

With two outs in the third inning, Sale’s pitch count stood at 32, including only five in the frame, and he had retired eight of the first 10 batters faced. But what appeared to be another chapter in a spectacular start to Sale’s season quickly unraveled. He walked Jose Ramirez on 10 pitches even after he got ahead of him 1-2 in the count and Francisco Lindor singled. Mike Napoli’s drive to left-center field then fell in between Austin Jackson and Melky Cabrera for a two-run triple to put the Indians ahead for good.

But the inning wasn’t yet over.

Sale walked Carlos Santana on seven pitches and Juan Uribe won a nine-pitch battle when he dumped a 2-2 changeup into right for an RBI single. Though Sale struck out Marlon Byrd to end the inning, he never recovered.

Chris Gimenez started the fourth inning with a solo homer off Sale — only the sixth he has allowed in 71.2 innings this season. The left-hander would issue two more walks and an RBI single to Lindor to fall behind 5-1 before he exited the game.

Sale’s attempt to become only the first starting pitcher to win 10 straight since San Diego’s Andy Hawkins in 1985 ended with his shortest start since he lasted only three innings on Sept. 13, 2015.

Sale allowed six earned runs and seven hits with four walks. He struck out seven.

The White Sox offense looked as if it may put up a fight against Cleveland’s Josh Tomlin, who improved to 7-0 with eight sharp innings.

Adam Eaton opened the game with a solo home run to right field, his third, to give the White Sox a 1-0 advantage.

But White Sox bats again fell silent and Tomlin settled in and largely avoided trouble from there.

He retired Tyler Saladino with two on to end a potential second-inning rally and used a base-running mistake by the White Sox to build late momentum.

Down 6-1 in the fourth, the White Sox scored a run on consecutive one-out doubles by Jose Abreu, who had three hits, and Brett Lawrie. But Lawrie was caught off second base on Avisail Garcia’s grounder to shortstop and was thrown out after a brief rundown. On the play, Garcia overran first base and was doubled off to end the inning.

Beginning with the Garcia groundout, Tomlin retired 12 straight until Adam Eaton’s two-out single in the eighth inning.

The White Sox finished with six hits and scored three or fewer runs for the eighth time in 11 contests. They’ve produced three or fewer runs in 23 of 47 games this season and dropped to 7-16 in those contests.

White Sox bullpen in as 'good' a position as possible

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White Sox bullpen in as 'good' a position as possible

They merely hoped to survive the doubleheader, but members of the White Sox bullpen feel as if they’re well positioned for success.

The combined efforts of Mat Latos and Erik Johnson limited the number of outs covered by the White Sox bullpen to 16 in Monday’s doubleheader. Latos and Johnson completed 12.2 of the 18 innings played, which meant no White Sox relievers appeared in both games. Of the five relievers to pitch, Matt Purke’s 2.1 innings was the longest stint. Given they have eight relievers on hand, the White Sox like where they’re at as the pass the midpoint in a stretch with 17 games in 16 days.

“That’s about as good as you can do,” closer David Robertson said. “If we’d have had two wins it would have been a lot better. But it was a good job by the staff altogether, the starters and relievers. The defense played really well, saved us a lot of runs. It was a long day yesterday.”

White Sox manager Robin Ventura only used Purke in the nightcap. In the opener, he turned to Zach Duke, Matt Albers, Nate Jones and Robertson, a group that ultimately closed out a 7-6 victory.

Duke, who pitched in parts of two innings, said he had a pretty good idea he wouldn’t be used in the second game and the same likely went for Albers.

“They kind of give us an idea what the plan is going to be that way we’re not going to be caught off guard by anything,” Duke said. “But like I say, when the phone rings you find a way to get the job done.”

The White Sox added Tommy Kahnle to the roster before Monday’s doubleheader and kept him in the majors afterward, opting to send Erik Johnson back to Triple-A Charlotte. The White Sox still have eight more consecutive games to play after Tuesday’s contest against the Cleveland Indians before a day off next Thursday. Given they’re set to play the New York Mets in interleague, they may stick with the eight-man bullpen for now.

“We wanted to make sure we were covered down there,” Ventura said. “You never know how that’s going to go.”

Juan Uribe 'never forgot what it meant to play' for White Sox

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Juan Uribe 'never forgot what it meant to play' for White Sox

In the few times he has returned to U.S. Cellular Field, Juan Uribe always makes sure to enter on 35th and Shields so he can catch a glimpse of his statue.

Even though he’s eight years and five teams removed, Uribe said Tuesday he fondly recalls his time with the White Sox. In a Game 2 victory on Monday, the Cleveland Indians third baseman homered against his former club for the first time ever in 25 career plate appearances.

Making only his third trip to U.S. Cellular since he left the White Sox for the San Francisco Giants in 2009, Uribe received a nice standing ovation when he batted for the first time.

“I never forgot what it meant to play here,” Uribe said. “They see me and for me it’s a lot of happy. I’m just comfortable when I play in Chicago. I’m a lot of happy, too. My family too. My family comes in when I play in Chicago. My family comes in and they come to see me.”

Uribe played five seasons with the White Sox and reached the postseason twice, including in his final season (2008). He since won a World Series with Giants in 2010 and has reached the postseason in each of the last three years, twice with the Los Angeles Dodgers and again with the 2015 New York Mets.

“Some people think I need to hit .300 or I need to hit .400 and then they are looking to win the game,” Uribe said. “When you do win, the city never forgets. The people never forget.

“The money, you can have it. But the win, you always remember. The people always remember what you do for this city. Look at what happened. I go to Chicago, I go to the Giants and they know me. A lot of people, they know Uribe for the World Series. They don’t know Uribe for how much money he’s making.”

Uribe not only enjoyed the warm welcome and the homer, he also had an opportunity to banter with fans above the home dugout throughout the contest. He said they very much remember the critical role he played on the 2005 World Series team, including throwing to first base for the final out of Game 4 — the moment memorialized on the statue.

And that’s why he doesn’t mind taking the long route into the ballpark when he could very easily go through the players’ entrance in left field.

“The fans they never forgot what you do here,” Uribe said. “For me, it’s unbelievable.

“Every time I come to the ballpark, I come that way and I see it. I tell people when they are in Chicago, ‘Go to the front and you’ll see me there.’”