Hahn doesn't foresee lineup upgrade on the horizon

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Hahn doesn't foresee lineup upgrade on the horizon

After finalizing the signing of reliever Matt Lindstrom on Friday, the White Sox may be done making significant moves for the offseason.

That doesn't mean the team isn't looking to make another move. Instead, it means they may not be anticipating one.

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Adding a left-handed bat to the middle of the team's lineup has been cast as a "need" since A.J. Pierzynski officially signed elsewhere, but it's a move general manager Rick Hahn won't make just for the sake of adding a left-handed bat.

"We are still actively looking for something that provides us with an upgrade," Hahn explained. "But we are not going to make the move for a left-handed bat simply because its a left-handed bat."

One name that's been connected with the White Sox in offseason trade rumors has been Arizona's Jason Kubel. The free agent cupboard is fairly bare at this point in late January, with none of the available options -- for instance, ex-Indians designated hitter Travis Hafner -- looking like a fit.

Only 10 free agent outfielders remain on the market, and of those, six bat left-handed. But Michael Bourn is likely too expensive, both from a draft pick and money standpoint, and wouldn't fit a middle-of-the-order need anyways. The same goes for Bobby Abreu and Johnny Damon, the latter of whom may be on his way to retirement anyways. Former Indians outfielder Grady Sizemore won't be healthy until the middle of the season, when he reportedly plans on signing with a team.

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That leaves ex-Sox Scott Podsednik and Ryan Sweeney on the market, neither of whom fit the bill, either.

"Based on the pool that is available right now, we dont see that upgrade there," Hahn said. "You look at whats happening thus far this offseason and you have not seen a lot of premium left-handed bats, perhaps with the exception of Josh Hamilton, change teams. We certainly had a number of conversations about it. But again we are not going to force the fit just to make the move."

Still, with Detroit featuring a menacing rotation stocked with right-handers, plenty have warmed up to the idea of adding a left-hander. Hahn, though, was quick to offer a reminder that the White Sox don't actually play the Tigers until July, when the need for a left-handed bat may be more clear.

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"For me, the season needs to start, then we'll go and see what happens," manager Robin Ventura added.

The White Sox expect Dayan Viciedo to hit better than he did in 2012, in which he hit .255.300.444 with 25 home runs. But Viciedo had just a .650 OPS against right-handers and struck out 103 times in 410 plate appearances -- if that production remains stagnant, left field may be where the White Sox look to improve.

Those improvements could come internally, though, with Dewayne Wise or Jordan Danks siphoning off some playing time. For now, though, Hahn says talks remain "preliminary" about adding a left-handed bat, and Ventura didn't sound too concerned with the righty-heavy state of his lineup.

"It's nice," Ventura said of potentially adding a lefty. "But it's not mandatory by any means."

Todd Frazier's late RBI single lifts White Sox past Blue Jays

Todd Frazier's late RBI single lifts White Sox past Blue Jays

The White Sox haven’t had much success with runners in scoring position of late. Todd Frazier hasn’t had much all season long.

But Frazier’s two-out RBI single in the eighth inning Friday night broke a tie and the White Sox held on for a 3-2 victory over the Toronto Blue Jays in front of 27,196 at U.S. Cellular Field. The victory was the fourth in five games for the White Sox, who improved to 37-37. Frazier’s hit was the only one with a runner in scoring position in 14 tries for a team that entered the game hitting .245 in those situations. He finished 2-for-4.

Though Frazier has provided the White Sox with plenty of thump, he’s had a trying season with runners in scoring position. He entered his eighth-inning at-bat with Jesse Chavez just 9-for-61 with two home runs and 23 RBIs with runners in scoring position, including a third-inning ground out. But Frazier got a 1-1 fastball from Chavez and ripped it into left field to put the White Sox ahead and end a frustrating night for the offense, particularly the bottom of the order.

The White Sox had left a man in scoring position in all but one inning up until that point. They tied the game at 1 in the fourth inning on an RBI groundout by Avisail Garcia and pulled ahead in the fifth on a solo homer by Melky Cabrera, who went 3-for-4 against his former team.

Prior to Frazier’s single, Cabrera grounded out to first as Edwin Encarnacion made a spectacular stop and fell down in foul territory. Tim Anderson, who doubled and went to third on a fly ball, didn’t advance on the play. But Frazier made it all moot.

Carlos Rodon had another strong outing, though he surrendered the lead right before he exited.

Rodon struck out eight and tamed a red hot offense for 5 2/3 innings. The left-hander fell behind 1-0 in the second inning and looked as if he may be in trouble before escaping the jam with a strikeout of Junior Lake to strand two. That began a stretch in which Rodon retired 11 of 14 batters and allowed the White Sox to rally for a 2-1 lead.

But Rodon couldn’t hold it, in part because of a sixth-inning balk call by first-base ump Angel Hernandez that earned pitching coach Don Cooper an ejection. Rodon hit Michael Saunders to start the sixth and he advanced on the balk and tagged up on a fly out to center. The extra 90 feet became critical when Kevin Pillar’s infield single tied it. Todd Frazier made a diving stop on the play at first base and Rodon took one too many steps to tag first base just behind the slide of Pillar.

Rodon allowed two earned runs and six hits with two walks.

The White Sox bullpen picked up the slack. Matt Albers, Nate Jones and Zach Duke combined for 2 1/3 scoreless innings to get the ball to Robertson. Robertson then pitched out of a bases-loaded, one-out jam for his 19th save in 21 tries.

Today on CSN: White Sox continue series with Blue Jays

Today on CSN: White Sox continue series with Blue Jays

The White Sox take on the Blue Jays this afternoon, and you can catch all the action on Comcast SportsNet. Coverage begins with White Sox Pregame Live at 12:30 p.m. Be sure to stick around after the final out to get analysis and player reaction on White Sox Postgame Live.

Today’s starting pitching matchup: R.A. Dickey (4-8, 4.08) vs. Miguel Gonzalez (1-2, 4.29)

Click here for a game preview to make sure you’re ready for the action.

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White Sox: No timeframe for Zach Putnam, surgery an option

White Sox: No timeframe for Zach Putnam, surgery an option

Zach Putnam is weighing his options after he had a second opinion on Friday and surgery is one of them.

The White Sox reliever went on the disabled list Tuesday with ulnar neuritis in his right elbow. Putnam, who has a 2.30 ERA in 25 games this season, last pitched on Sunday in Cleveland.

“(Surgery is) possible,” general manager Rick Hahn said. “But again, we are exploring all the options. We want to make sure we have all the possibilities laid out before us. It’s just one of the things we are considering.”

“Still parceling through the options and at this point we don’t have a specific timeframe for him.”

The White Sox bullpen already is short-handed after losing Jake Petricka to potentially season-ending hip surgery earlier this month. Daniel Webb is out for the season after he had reconstructive elbow surgery earlier this month.

The White Sox bullpen currently features three rookies as result of those injuries and manager Robin Ventura doesn’t see any way of avoiding using them in key spots. Michael Ynoa and Chris Beck both got in and out of trouble and earned holds in Boston.

“We’re gonna have to find a way to get nine innings in and they’re gonna get tested,” Ventura said. “I thought Michael did a nice job the other day. I think even Beck after the first hitter, it could have been a mess. I thought he really showed what he’s made of by coming back. He gave up the sac fly and that was it.”