Peavy, Dunn giving Kenny Williams a return on investment


Peavy, Dunn giving Kenny Williams a return on investment

As sports fans, we are always looking for results, instant gratification in the form of some hardware for our beloved teams. We long for it because at the end of the day we deem the success of a professional ball club as our own. It is truly a personal investment both monetarily and emotionally. For the past 12 years, White Sox fans have intermittently praised and pointed the finger at general manager Kenny Williams. Approval ratings plummeted to an all-time low last year when 28 million in the form of Jake Peavy and Adam Dunn reaped next to no production. The first chapter of the 2012 season has told a much different story to this point so what is the reason for Williams sudden return on investment?

In 2011, Peavy was underwhelming to say the least. It may sound harsh, but the overpowering right-hander was having trouble with velocity and control which caused him to record the highest ERA (4.92) of his career. Peavy only saw 111 and 23 innings of action, less than half of his 2007 Cy Young year total. The problem was 2011 Jake and 2007 Jake were two completely different pitchers. Last year, Peavy was battling not only opposing hitters, but also the uncertainty of his surgically reattached lat muscle. It was his first season back from surgery to repair a completely torn latissimus dorsi and his lack of confidence in his body was glaringly obvious.

This year, Jake has taken a different approach to his pitching philosophy and the results are undeniable. While he still relies mostly on his fastball, Peavy has thrown substantially more change-ups this year, stressing location rather than trying to overpower hitters. He knows what his bodys limits are and he is beginning to play to his own strengths. Peavy holds the third lowest ERA (2.39) in the American League, the second lowest WHIP (.91), and is still top 10 in strikeouts. The south side ace was named AL Pitcher of the Month for April, and has already thrown more than half the amount of innings as he did last season. Peavy is currently in the final year of his contract, so naturally trade rumors have gotten louder as his production has increased but this has not fazed the anchor of the White Sox pitching staff, if anything it has made him more effective.

Another big time performer that has Williams wiping the sweat off his brow in relief is Dunn. The slugger is widely regarded across baseball as a pure power hitter. The behemoth of a man stands 66 285 lbs. and he can promise you two things: home runs and strikeouts. Unfortunately for Williams and the rest of Sox nation, Dunn only held true to one half of that statement last year. The big man hit a befuddling .159 last season and every single one of his power numbers dropped by more than 50 percent. Whether it was playing with a new team or facing new pitchers in the AL, Dunn was frustrated at the plate and at one point he even went as far as throwing around the idea of retirement.

If Im not having fun anymore, Ill go home, flat out Ill go home. I mean that. Swear to goodness, Ill go home. I enjoy playing, even though I suck, or have been sucking. I enjoy playing the game. Love it. But as soon as I lose that, Im gone dude. Its true, Dunn told Yahoo Sports in the midst of his slump.

It is apparent that Dunn has cast away whatever self-doubt he may have had. He's already hit 15 homers, three more than his total last year, he is hitting .239 and rising, he has an OBP of .383, and he has driven in 35 runs. Dunn has already struck out 64 times in 148 at bats, but thats simply business as usual with the big fella. Dunns confidence is sky high right now and his preseason goal to be named Comeback Player of the Year is becoming more and more of a reality.

It is obvious that these two White Sox standouts are experiencing some sort of resurgence this season, but what is the reasoning for them being hotter than North Avenue Beach in July? Ultimately, it boils down to three things: money, reputation, and the future.

As we all know, one of the major motivating factors in professional sports is the all-mighty dollar. This year is the final stanza of Peavys three-year contract and he is scheduled to make 17 million, with a 22 million option next season. Whether the Sox plan to trade him before seasons end, pick up his option, or let him go to free agency, Peavy is in a make-or-break position and he knows it. A 15-20 win season could mean a long-term deal with a lot of zeros in it for Peavy. Dunn will make 14 million this year, and 15 million in 2013 and 2014 with the White Sox. Kenny Williams paid over 100 million dollars for these two premiere athletes and it appears as if they are finally giving a true return on investment.

The second motivating factor of the recent success of Dunn and Peavy is reputation. After a dismal 2011 season both of these once superstar-type players were put into question. They were not playing anywhere near the levels they were capable of and the south side faithful let them know it. Peavy mentioned that it was hard to go out to dinner with his family without being verbally harassed last year. He has admitted to taking the hill this season and throwing with a chip on his shoulder. So I think it is safe to say that both of these players have something to prove in 2012, and they are both well on their way there.

The third motivating factor for Peavy and Dunn is a harsh reality of not only sports but of any professional realm; tomorrow is never promised. Despite having a multi-year contract, your future as a major leaguer is never completely certain. We are talking about a 30-year-old Peavy and a 32-year-old Dunn who are both in what many would consider their prime. Two years ago, Peavy was told that if he re-injured himself he would never throw a baseball again and last year Dunn toyed with the idea of retirement so an uncertain future is not a foreign concept to these two.

The reality is both of these men are All-Atar caliber athletes who deserve the big time contracts they have been given. The only difference is that in 2012 they had their abilities and mental toughness questioned and they are responding in a big way. For that, Williams is breathing a sigh of relief.

--Joe Musso contributed to this article--

White Sox: Chris Getz's new player development role is to carry out 'vision of the scouts'

White Sox: Chris Getz's new player development role is to carry out 'vision of the scouts'

He may be limited on experience, but Chris Getz already has a strong idea about player development.

Getz -- who on Friday was named the White Sox director of player development -- worked the past two seasons as an assistant to baseball operations in player development for the Kansas City Royals. A fourth-round pick of the White Sox in the 2005 amateur draft, Getz replaces Nick Capra, who earlier this month was named the team’s third-base coach. A quick learner whom a baseball source said the Royals hoped to retain, Getz described his new position as being “very task oriented.”

“(The job) is carrying out the vision of the scouts,” Getz said. “The players identified by the scouts and then they are brought in and it’s a commitment by both the player and staff members to create an environment for that player to reach their ceiling.

“It’s a daily process.”

Getz, a University of Michigan product, played for the White Sox in 2008 and 2009 before he was traded to the Royals in a package for Mark Teahen in 2010. Previously drafted by the White Sox in 2002, he described the organization as “something that always will be in my DNA.”

[SHOP: Gear up, White Sox fans!]​

Getz stayed in Kansas City through 2013 and began to consider a front-office career as his playing career wound down. His final season in the majors was with the Toronto Blue Jays in 2014.

Royals general manager Dayton Moore hired Getz as an assistant to baseball operations in January 2015 and he quickly developed a reputation as both highly intelligent and likeable, according to a club source.

“He is extremely well-regarded throughout the game, and we believe he is going to have a positive impact on the quality of play from rookie ball through Chicago,” GM Rick Hahn said.

Getz had as many as four assistant GMs ahead of him with the Royals, who couldn’t offer the same kind of position as the White Sox did. Getz spent the past week meeting with other members of the White Sox player development staff and soon will head to the team’s Dominican Republic academy. After that he’ll head to the Arizona Fall League as he becomes familiar with the department. Though he’s still relatively new, Getz knows what’s expected of his position.

“It’s focused on what’s in front of you,” Getz said. “Player development people are trying to get the player better every single day.”

“With that being said, the staff members need to be creative in their thinking. They need to be innovative at times. They need to know when to press the gas or pump the brakes. They need to be versatile in all these different areas.”

White Sox name Chris Getz Director of Player Development

White Sox name Chris Getz Director of Player Development

The White Sox announced on Friday they have named former MLB infielder Chris Getz as Director of Player Development.

Getz replaces Nick Capra, who after five seasons in his position was named the White Sox third base coach on Oct. 14.

The 33-year-old Getz has spent the last two years with the Kansas City Royals as a baseball operations assistant/player development in which he assisted in minor-league operations and player personnel decisions.

[SHOP: Gear up, White Sox fans!]​

“I'm excited about the opportunity to help teach and develop young talent in the organization where my professional career began,” Getz said in a press release. “I was drafted twice, worked through the minor leagues, and reached the major leagues with the White Sox. Through this journey, I was able to gain an understanding of the individuals within this organization, who I respect greatly.  The director of player development is an important role, and the health of the minor-league system is vital for major-league success.  I look forward to putting my all into making the White Sox a strong and winning organization.”
White Sox Senior VP/general manager Rick Hahn added: “We are pleased to add Chris’ intellect, background and energy to our front office. He is extremely well-regarded throughout the game, and we believe he is going to have a positive impact on the quality of play from rookie ball through Chicago.”

Getz, originally a fourth-round selection by the White Sox in the 2005 MLB Draft out of Michigan, played in seven MLB seasons with the White Sox (2008-09), Royals (2010-13) and Blue Jays (2014).

Getz had a career slash line of .250/.309/.307 with three home runs, 111 RBI and 89 stolen bases.