Peavy's flexibility allowed for return to White Sox

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Peavy's flexibility allowed for return to White Sox

The White Sox always wanted to retain Jake Peavy and it only made more sense as the market for free agent pitchers began to take shape. When Peavy showed a strong desire to return, a potential pact became more logical.

Compared with the extended, lucrative deals needed to land Zack Greinke, Anibal Sanchez or Kyle Lohse this offseason, the two-year, 29 million contract Peavy signed on Tuesday afternoon, just days before he became a free agent, falls directly in line with what the White Sox wanted.

While the club paid a premium price for Peavys next two seasons -- hell make 14.5 million in each and could receive 15 million in 2015 -- they didnt have to overpay to bring in a quality pitcher.

Less than two years after he had potentially career-ending surgery, Peavy showed the White Sox he has plenty left in 2012. The right-hander was 11-12 with a 3.37 ERA in a team-high 219 innings over 32 starts last season and struck out 194 batters.

The length was absolutely key for us, White Sox general manager Rick Hahn said on a conference call on Tuesday night. Being able to insulate ourselves against having a long-term deal and the risk involved in any long-term deal, much less with a pitcher, being able to do something on a shorter-term basis had a greater appeal to us. You will see a fairly robust (pitchers market) this offseason -- deals beyond comfortable where we were interested in going. We made a deal and were able to do it on terms we found palatable.

The White Sox can thank Peavy and agent Jeff Barry for their willingness.

Even though Peavy likely would have received a bigger payday on the open market when he became a free agent on Friday, his desire was to return to the White Sox. Therefore, Peavy, who also won the first Rawlings Gold Glove of his career on Tuesday night, did what he could to ensure a return.

I never wanted any games, Peavy said. I was open and upfront about (returning). I certainly did all in my power to return to where Im the happiest.

Hahn and Peavy said contract talks started strong and then cooled off to the point Peavy was concerned he might not return to a club, which acquired him from the San Diego Padres for four pitchers on July 31, 2009.

But talks between the sides gained traction quickly over the last 72 hours, Hahn said.

Part of it was the concession Peavy made to allow the White Sox to pay the 4 million buyout on his 2013 club option from 2016-19. Another aspect is that Peavys 2015 player option kicks in only if he stays healthy and passes certain statistical thresholds, figures Hahn declined to reveal.

(Flexibility) played a huge roll, Hahn said. We got creative.

Peavy said he didnt want the White Sox to hurt their ability to acquire other quality players in order to ensure his return. The team also exercised its 9.5 million option on pitcher Gavin Floyd on Tuesday to bolster its 2013 rotation.

It has to fit for everybody, Peavy said. There has to be give and take from everybody, flexibility. We both gave a little bit on what we both wanted to do. You want to come back on a deal that doesnt hamstring the team.

The final piece to the puzzle is the timing, Hahn noted. Had Peavy gone on the open market, theres no telling what other teams would have offered. The Los Angeles Dodgers, for instance, have a big checkbook a might have opened it to attract the 2007 National League Cy Young winner. With free agency only 72 hours away, Hahn knew the White Sox had to make their move.

Our chances would likely take a serious hit once he got out there, Hahn said. We were aggressive, otherwise we wouldnt have got something done. He knew where he wanted to be and knew it was a fair deal and he was motivated to get something done.

White Sox agree to one-year deals with Brett Lawrie, Avisail Garcia

White Sox agree to one-year deals with Brett Lawrie, Avisail Garcia

Brett Lawrie and Avisail Garcia will both return to the White Sox in 2017.

The team announced it reached deals with both players shortly before Friday’s 7 p.m. CST nontender deadline. Lawrie will earn $3.5 million next season and Garcia received a one-year deal for $3 million.

The club didn’t tender a contract to right-handed pitcher Blake Smith, which leaves its 40-man roster at 38.

Acquired last December for a pair of minor leaguers, Lawrie hit .248/.310/.413 with 12 home runs, 22 doubles and 36 RBIs in 94 games before he suffered a season-ending injury.

Lawrie produced 0.9 f-WAR when he suffered what then-manager Robin Ventura described a “tricky” injury on July 21. Despite numerous tests and a lengthy rehab, Lawrie never returned to the field and was frustrated by the experience. Last month, Lawrie tweeted that he believes the cause of his injury was wearing orthotics for the first time in his career.

He was projected to earn $5.1 million, according to MLBTraderumors.com and earned $4.125 million in 2016.

Garcia hit .245/.307/.385 with 12 homers and 51 RBIs in 453 plate appearances over 120 games. The projected salary for Garcia, arb-eligible for the first time, was $3.4 million.

The team also offered contracts to Miguel Gonzalez and Todd Frazier, who are eligible for free agency in 2018, first baseman Jose Abreu and relievers Dan Jennings, Zach Putnam and Jake Petricka, among others.

The White Sox have until mid-January to reach an agreement with their arbitration-eligible players. If they haven’t, both sides submit figures for arbitration cases, which are then heard throughout February.

White Sox announcer Jason Benetti cracks Crain's 40 under 40

White Sox announcer Jason Benetti cracks Crain's 40 under 40

Crain's Chicago Business released its latest 40 under 40 project and White Sox announcer Jason Benetti made this year's list.

The 33-year-old just finished his first season with the White Sox as play-by-play announcer, working the home games at U.S. Cellular Field (before it was renamed Guaranteed Rate Field last month) alongside Steve Stone as longtime broadcaster Hawk Harrelson saw his workload reduced to mostly road games.

Benetti quickly became a fan favorite among Chicagoans on CSN and other networks in 2016 and his cerebral palsy became more of a backstory, with his work alongside Stone and his affable sense of humor taking center stage instead.

Among other topics, Benetti discussed how he approaches his job of broadcasting for the team he grew up rooting for:

Law school taught me that there are always two sides of the argument. I see it from the Sox prism, but I can’t believe in my heart of hearts that, if the Sox lose, the world’s over anymore. That first game, I was like, “All right, it’s just a game.” And then Avi Garcia hits a homer late in the game against the Indians and I call it like I would call it with a little more. And as the ball cleared the fence, when it was rolling around, I got a slight tear in my eye. And I was like, “What’s that?”

Check out the entire interview with Benetti and the full list at ChicagoBusiness.com.