Ramirez wants his gold medal back

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Ramirez wants his gold medal back

Winning Gold at the 2004 Summer Olympics in Greece is one of Alexei Ramirez' greatest accomplishments of his career. But he doesn't have the medal anymore, as it was lost during his move from Cuba to the United States.

And by lost, he means it was stolen.

MLB.com's Scott Merkin has the story, which is pretty heartbreaking. Ramirez sounds like someone who's come to grips with never getting the medal back, although he still throws a few Hail Mary ebay searches hoping it turns up.

Getting a replacement medal sounds like a frustrating process of navigating through red tape and bureaucracy, although kudos to the White Sox for trying on behalf of their shortstop. Hopefully, someday there will be some closure to this story, although it doesn't look like that's all too likely.

Rob Manfred looks at the positives of MLB's second base sliding rule

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Rob Manfred looks at the positives of MLB's second base sliding rule

A few hundred feet away from a White Sox clubhouse in which players are somewhat confused by baseball’s new second base sliding rule, Major League Baseball Commissioner Rob Manfred preferred to focus on the positives of the edict put in place prior to the 2016 season. 

After Pittsburgh Pirates shortstop Jung Ho Kang and New York Mets shortstop Ruben Tejada both suffered serious injuries on takeout slides last year, MLB added a rule that stipulates players must make a “bona fide” effort to slide into, not around or past, second base. Intentionally grabbing a player’s leg to disrupt a throw is now illegal, as are late slides that take a player out of the baseline or past second base. 

The rule, in effect, is clear: “Just slide into the bag,” White Sox shortstop Jimmy Rollins said. 

But the implementation of it hasn’t been consistent. Last weekend in a game against the Baltimore Orioles, the White Sox thought they had a triple play turned when Manny Machado reached out and grabbed second baseman Brett Lawrie until it was a ruled clean slide. 

“I don’t feel like anybody has a feel on it, to be honest with you,” Lawrie said, explaining what happened to him at Camden Yards. “… Unfortunately, that goes against one of the points in the rule and when you don’t follow through with that, you tell everybody that, well, nobody really knows and you guys just don’t really get it yet.”

Lawrie’s gripe is that different umpires and review crews will have different gray areas for what’s acceptable at second base and what’s not. When the Toronto Blue Jays’ Jose Bautista grabbed Tampa Bay Rays infielder Logan Forsythe’s leg on a ninth-inning double play attempt, a review determined Bautista’s actions violated the rule, and he was ruled out to end an early April game. That was the first high-profile instance of the new rule being enforced, and was one that resonated across major league clubhouses. It’s what Lawrie pointed to when discussing the non-call in Baltimore. 

Manfred understands the adjustment period for players and umpires regarding the rule. As was the case when MLB implemented its rule to cut down on collisions at home plate, there was bound to be some confusion for everyone in getting used to playing the game a different way. 

But Manfred doesn’t expect whatever problems do exist to last for long. 

“Whenever you change a rule with respect to the play of the game on the field, there’s going to be a period of adjustment,” Manfred said. “There has certainly been one in respect to the slide rule, but I focus on the positive. Number one, I do think the rule serves a really important purpose and that is protecting players and I think even in the last couple of weeks, you see us getting more to the kind of equilibrium that we reached with respect to the home plate rule and quite frankly, we got there a little faster at second base than we did at home plate.”

Rollins, a 17-year major league veteran, similarly compared the second base rule to the home plate one and expressed optimism that the wrinkles of it will be ironed out in the future.

“We see a guy get called out for reaching across and grabbing a player and then it happens to us trying to turn a triple play and they interpret it as a clean slide when clearly (Machado) reached out and grabbed Brett,” Rollins said. “It’s like the home plate rule, there’s still a lot of things to work out. But the home plate rule, they said slide in and we’ll go look at it and hopefully get it right, and they eventually got that right. It’ll be the same thing at second.” 

White Sox place Jake Petricka on the 15-day disabled list

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White Sox place Jake Petricka on the 15-day disabled list

The injury bug refuses to leave the White Sox alone.

Just as outfielder Avisail Garcia returned to the lineup on Thursday, reliever Jake Petricka has been placed on the 15-day disabled list with a right hip impingement. Petricka is the fourth White Sox player to hit the DL since Alex Avila suffered a right hamstring strain on April 24 and that doesn’t count Garcia, who missed the team’s last four games with a right hamstring strain.

The White Sox recalled Tommy Kahnle from Triple-A Charlotte to take the place of Petricka, who needs at least a week off after his discomfort worsened during a Wednesday bullpen session.

“It’s something he’s been dealing with,” White Sox manager Robin Ventura said. “More than anything, this is something that had to happen. We weren’t going to be able to use him for a week at least to be able get over this. The way he’s throwing, you want him back to feeling 100 percent so you’re not going to go injure anything trying to protect it.

“It’s something that’s there. It was more pronounced yesterday than at any point that he’s brought up. But definitely at the point where we need to take care of this.”

Garcia, who has a five-game hitting streak, finally got cleared after several days of testing his hamstring. Ventura said Wednesday’s test was thorough.

“He says he’s ready to go,” Ventura said. “They tested him pretty good (Wednesday), though.”

Avila is also ready to resume action. His baseball bag was loaded and sitting out in front of his clubhouse stall. He’ll join Triple-A Charlotte on Friday and begin a rehab assignment.

The White Sox also made another pair of moves official on Thursday. The club promoted pitcher Erik Johnson from Charlotte and designated John Danks for assignment. The White Sox 40-man roster now stands at 38 after Danks’ removal.

Jerry Reinsdorf to be next featured guest on "Inside Look"

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Jerry Reinsdorf to be next featured guest on "Inside Look"

“Inside Look presented by Cadillac,” hosted by Comcast SportsNet’s Chuck Garfien, featuring Jerry Reinsdorf to debut Thursday, May 12 at 7:00 PM CT

CSNChicago.com to provide additional web-exclusive coverage of ‘Inside Look,’ including extended video clips

Chicago, IL (May 5, 2016) – Comcast SportsNet, the television home for the most games and most comprehensive coverage of the Chicago Blackhawks, Bulls, Cubs and White Sox, continues to delve into the lives of some of the biggest names in Chicago sports with its candid, monthly, one-on-one interview series Inside Look presented by Cadillac

Debuting Thursday, May 12 at 7:00 PM CT, Comcast SportsNet’s Chuck Garfien hosts an exclusive one-on-one interview with Chicago Bulls & White Sox Chairman/Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame 2016 inductee JERRY REINSDORF.  Since Reinsdorf’s purchase of the Chicago Bulls in 1985, the Bulls won six world championships and became one of the most iconic teams in the history of sports. In addition, Reinsdorf has done extensive charitable work to benefit the Chicago Public Schools and the Chicago Park District and was awarded the Jefferson Award for Public Service for leading the philanthropic outreach of the Chicago White Sox and Chicago Bulls Charities.

In this edition of “Inside Look,” Reinsdorf discusses his life in pro basketball which includes candid discussion about the honor of entering the Hall, his fondest Bulls moments, along with his thoughts on those individuals who he considers being the key factors in his NBA success story, including Michael Jordan and former Bulls GM Jerry Krause. 

In addition, viewers are urged to check out Comcast SportsNet’s website, CSNChicago.com, for additional interview content never before seen on TV.  Fans will also be able to watch every Inside Look guest interview online after it debuts on Comcast SportsNet.  Comcast SportsNet will also re-air Inside Look with Jerry Reinsdorf on the following dates/times: Fri , May 13 at 9:30 PM (on CSN+HD) - Sat, May 14 at 8:30 PM (on CSN+HD) - Sun, May 15 at NOON - Wed, May 18 at 12:30 PM - Thu, May 19 at 4:00 PM - Fri, May 20 at 1:00 PM (on CSN+HD) - Sat, May 21 at 2:30 PM (on CSN+HD) - Tue, May 24 at 4:00 PM - Thu, May 26 at 1:00 PM - Fri, May 27 at 5:00 PM & Sat, May 31 at 5:30 PM (on CSN+HD). (Schedule subject to change).

Note the following quotes from Inside Look with Jerry Reinsdorf presented by Cadillac premiering Thursday, May 12 at 7:00 PM on Comcast SportsNet:

Reinsdorf on entering the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame

“I don’t look at it as my entering.  I think I am the representative of a lot of people.  I am really the front guy.  I pick people and put them in their jobs and, if I do my job right and if they do their job right, I get a lot of credit…and if they don’t, I get ripped.”

Reinsdorf on Michael Jordan:

“No one knew what was coming.  I didn’t know what was coming.  No one knew what Michael Jordan was going to be.  I think if they had known what Michael Jordan was going to turn out to be, I don’t think they would not have sold the team.”

Reinsdorf on Jerry Krause:

“Jerry Krause was the genius that put this organization together.  He had Michael…he doesn’t get credit for drafting Michael, but you have to put the right pieces around him.  The single biggest move he made was trading Charles Oakley for Bill Cartwright.  I don’t think we win the first couple championships without Bill Cartwright.  Jerry Krause certainly belongs in the Hall of Fame for what he did.  In fact, I would not be going into the Hall of Fame if it weren’t for Jerry Krause.”

Reinsdorf on who he will be thinking about during his Hall of Fame speech:

“I will be thinking about Jerry Krause and (former Bulls Executive VP-Business Operations) Steve Schanwald and Michael and Scottie (Pippen) and Phil (Jackson) and the fans of Chicago. You have to remember the fans of Chicago supported us when we were bad.  During the period after Michael left, we weren’t in the playoffs for seven years or so and we led the team in attendance, not every year, but the aggregate.  So, I will be thinking about the fans of Chicago and how happy the Bulls make them.”