SI unveils White Sox health report

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SI unveils White Sox health report

Sports Illustrated's Will Carroll and Dan Wade rolled out their yearly pre-season injury reports for each MLB team on Wednesday, and as usual, they dole out praise to Herm Schneider and his training staff. I really like this line from Dan:

"The front office may not intentionally present the med staff with a team full of problem cases, but knowing that even chronic injuries can be managed by this top-line team has to give Kenny Williams and Rick Hahn a greater sense of freedom with respect to player acquisition."

Freddy Garcia turned out to be a big part of the Sox rotation in 2009 and 2010, managing to stay healthy after a few injury-riddled years after he was dealt to Philadelphia following the 2006 season. Carlos Quentin ran into numerous injuries during his four-year tenure with the Sox, but managed to play at least 130 games in half of those seasons. Those are just two examples of many, but there's no doubting that the Sox do have a great asset in their training staff.

With that in mind, here's how the list breaks down (explanation of the system here):

Green light: Alexei Ramirez, Brent Morel, Alex Rios, Adam Dunn, Gavin Floyd

Yellow light: A.J. Pierzynski, Paul Konerko, Gordon Beckham, Alejandro De Aza, John Danks, Philip Humber, Jesse Crain, Matt Thornton

Red light: Dayan Viciedo, Jake Peavy, Chris Sale

I think concerns over Viciedo's weight are a little overblown, but Dan does make a good point that if Viciedo picks up a minor knock, he won't be able to be stashed at DH. Luckily, the Sox have Kosuke Fukudome and Brent Lillibridge on the roster, so if he needs a break, they won't lose much overall.

Sale's red light rating comes from his expected innings bump, but I'd expect the Sox to meticulously manage Sale's workload throughout the season even if they're in contention.

Peavy's an obvious red light, no matter how good he says he feels. He hasn't made more than 18 starts since 2008 and hasn't pitched a full season injury-free since winning the Cy Young in 2007.

Last thought: I was a little surprised to not see De Aza in the red light section given his promising career with the Marlins was derailed due to a string of injuries a few years ago. He was healthy all through 2011, though, and hopefully under the watch of Schneider he'll stay that way in 2012.

Preview: Carlos Rodon, White Sox open final series of season vs. Twins on CSN+

Preview: Carlos Rodon, White Sox open final series of season vs. Twins on CSN+

The White Sox open their final series of the season tonight, and you can catch all the action on CSN+. Coverage begins with White Sox Pregame Live at 6:30 p.m. Be sure to stick around after the final out to get analysis and player reaction on White Sox Postgame Live.

Tonight’s starting pitching matchup: Carlos Rodon (8-10, 4.08 ERA) vs. Tyler Duffey (9-11, 6.18 ERA)

Click here for a game preview to make sure you’re ready for the action.

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— Channel finder: Make sure you know where to watch.

— Latest on the White Sox: All of the most recent news and notes.

— See what fans are talking about before, during and after the game with White Sox Pulse.

White Sox five-game winning streak snapped with loss to Rays

White Sox five-game winning streak snapped with loss to Rays

The playoffs were the ultimate goal and he probably would have liked another victory on Thursday night.

But Jose Quintana has plenty to be proud about when he takes stock of his 2016 campaign, which ended with a 5-3 White Sox loss to the Tampa Rays in front of 14,792 at U.S. Cellular Field. The first-time All-Star’s record dropped to 13-12 after he allowed two earned runs in six innings in his final start, but not before Quintana established career highs for innings pitched, strikeouts and earned-run average. The loss guaranteed a fourth straight losing season for the White Sox, who haven’t reached the postseason since 2008.

“I’m happy with my year,” Quintana said. “But every time I say it’s not about me. It’s about the team. We’ll try to finish strong in the next series against the Twins and come back next year to have a better year than this one.”

Quintana had the best individual season of his career. If he’d received any kind of run support from his teammates, he’d be at or near the top of the leaders for wins, too.

But same as he has for the past four seasons, Quintana didn’t receive any run support yet again on Thursday, though this time can be attributed to a stellar performance by Chris Archer.

Archer held down early an offense that had Quintana ranked 116th out of 132 qualified starting pitchers in run support. The White Sox only had two runners reach scoring position in the time Quintana pitched (one scored). By the time Archer slowed down, the White Sox bullpen allowed three runs and the contest was nearly out of reach at 5-1.

Still, Quintana was good enough to win yet again in a season full of comparable efforts.

He allowed a run in the second inning on a bloop RBI single by Alexei Ramirez and another in the fourth on a solo homer by Mikie Mahtook. Other than that he was his normal efficient self, striking out seven and limiting the Rays to two runs and five hits in six innings.

The effort lowered Quintana’s ERA to 3.20 (his previous low was 3.32 in 2014). He also surpassed his previous high-inning mark of 206 1/3 with 208 this season. And, Quintana, who eclipsed the 10-win mark for the first time in his career, finished with 181 strikeouts, three more than he in 2014.

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White Sox manager Robin Ventura thinks the overall production was a byproduct of the first All-Star nod for Quintana, who surpassed 200 innings for a fourth straight season.

“You wouldn’t think that would mean a lot, but it really does,” Ventura said. “I think that’s the stuff that can catapult somebody into things that are better and pushing him into the offseason, the optimistic stuff of going into next year.”

Quintana’s name often surfaces as an easy fix to some of the White Sox’ woes when it comes to next season.

With two guaranteed seasons and two club-friendly options left on his current contract, Quintana — who entered Thursday valued at 19.7 f-WAR for his career — is viewed as a stellar trade chip given the weak free agent class. It is believed the White Sox could solve several problem areas on the roster or add considerable depth to their farm system were they to make Quintana or Chris Sale available. Quintana knows the possibility exists but hopes he’s back with the White Sox next season and helping them end their postseason drought.

“I don’t have control about that,” Quintana said. “I don’t know nothing about trades. I’m here as a Chicago White Sox, and I want to be here for a long time. I’ll go home, rest and am going to be ready to start with my preparation for next year. I’ll be ready for that, but I don’t have control about trades.”