Sox face off against 49-year-old Moyer Sunday

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Sox face off against 49-year-old Moyer Sunday

This post is really just an excuse to point to the fantastic profile of Jamie Moyer penned by NBC Sports' Bob Harkins last week. But while we're here, the 49-year-old Moyer will take on the White Sox Sunday in Arizona, looking to return to the majors after undergoing Tommy John surgery last year.

Moyer has faced the White Sox 24 times in his 24-year career, making 21 starts and throwing 141 13 innings. He owns a 4.20 ERA against them, although Sox hitters have just a .308 on-base percentage against the modern-day Ed Harris.

He made his major-league debut on June 16, 1986. Today, Moyer will face a two hitters who were born after he threw his first big-league pitch:

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Mark GonzalesSox lineup vs. Colo: Lillibridge ss, Pierzynski C, Rios dh, Dunn 1b, Fukudome CF, Young rf, Mitchell lf, Escobar 2b, McPherson 3b, Danks p
Mar 11 via web Favorite Retweet Reply
Those will be Jared Mitchell (Oct. 13, 1988) and Eduardo Escobar (Jan. 5, 1989). John Danks was one year old when Moyer made the majors, and he wasn't born when Moyer was picked by the Cubs in the 1984 draft.

It's kind of a shame Omar Vizquel isn't around. That'd be a pretty awesome matchup.

Jose Quintana keeps dominating as White Sox top Red Sox

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Jose Quintana keeps dominating as White Sox top Red Sox

How much longer can Jose Quintana be described as the most overlooked good pitcher in baseball?

With more outings like this, it’ll be a designation he’ll quickly shed. 

The 27-year-old left-hander fired eight innings of one-run ball as the White Sox beat the Boston Red Sox, 4-1, in front of 15,025 at U.S. Cellular Field Tuesday night. 

After four seasons pitching as a consistent, solid force in the White Sox rotation — in which he’s been overshadowed by the dominance of Chris Sale — Quintana’s taken his pitching to another level so far this year. He lowered his ERA to 1.13 on Tuesday and has only issued eight walks in 38 2/3 innings covering six starts.

Quintana allowed his first home run of the season when Hanley Ramirez took him deep to right in the top of the fifth, but that was the only damage Boston was able to inflict. He aced David Ortiz for a strikeout looking in the fifth, and then blew away the retiring Red Sox slugger for a strikeout swinging in the seventh. 

He finished the evening allowing that one run on four hits with no walks and five strikeouts. 

Quintana again received ample support from a White Sox offense that’s reversing a head-scratching trend from the last few years. 

Facing knuckleballer Steven Wright, Jose Abreu smashed a line drive off the center field wall that outfielder Jackie Bradley Jr. misplayed into a triple, allowing Jimmy Rollins to score in the first inning. Todd Frazier’s bases-loaded groundout to third in the third inning tacked on the other run off Wright.

Abreu knocked in Adam Eaton and Jimmy Rollins with a two-run double in the eighth off Red Sox reliever Junichi Tazawa to add on a pair of insurance runs. 

David Robertson earned his ninth save of the season with a 1-2-3 ninth inning.  

The White Sox improved to 5-1 in games started by Quintana this season. From 2012-15, the White Sox were 13 games under .500 with Quintana starting despite the Colombia native’s solid 3.46 ERA. 

But this year, the White Sox have scored four or more runs in five of Quintana’s six starts. Quintana has never finished a season with a double-digit win total, but moved to 4-1 with his win Tuesday. 

Rick Hahn: Filling fifth spot in White Sox rotation a 'fluid situation'

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Rick Hahn: Filling fifth spot in White Sox rotation a 'fluid situation'

Erik Johnson gets the first chance at the No. 5 spot in the White Sox rotation, but the situation is hardly finalized.

The White Sox announced Tuesday that they would promote Johnson from Triple-A Charlotte in time to make Thursday’s start in place of John Danks, whom they will officially designated for assignment later this week. But just because Johnson gets the first start doesn’t mean he’s here for good, general manager Rick Hahn said.

Hahn and the White Sox have made it clear they want better production from the fifth spot, whether it's from an internal or an external option.

“It’s going to be a bit of a fluid situation,” Hahn said.

Hahn is comfortable with the team’s internal options at Charlotte beyond Johnson.

Miguel Gonzalez, who started last Monday in Toronto, has a solid major league track record. Then there’s Jacob Turner, who has 27 strikeouts in 26 2/3 innings with a 3.04 ERA in five starts.

But Hahn also said the White Sox wouldn’t shy away from looking outside the farm system, either. Hahn declined to answer whether or not the White Sox would watch Tim Lincecum’s tryout Friday in Scottsdale, Ariz. before he noted the club has “scouts everywhere.”

The White Sox could also try and use their internal options to get by for several months before adding another pitcher ahead of the trade deadline.

No matter whom they turn to, the expectation is better results than the White Sox received from Danks, who was 0-4 with a 7.25 ER in four starts.

“Obviously, Erik starts on Thursday,” Hahn said. “After that, we may well make another move next week as we try to accomplish two things with that spot -- first and foremost, get greater production than we’ve been receiving thus far this year.”

“We do have a few internal options.

“If it does get to the point where we’re better off going outside the organization, obviously we’ve never been shy about doing that.”

White Sox react to John Danks’ departure

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White Sox react to John Danks’ departure

John Danks has called Chicago his home since 2007. But after nearly 10 years on the South Side, the White Sox have decided to part ways with their longest tenured player.

Danks will be designated for assignment later this week, the team announced Tuesday, ending his time with the White Sox.

“It’s always tough,” manager Robin Ventura said. “You don’t really know what’s out there, but at this point, we’re going in a different direction.”

Entering Tuesday, the White Sox held the best record in the American League at 18-8. Danks started in four of those contests, but all resulted in losses in which he had an ERA of 7.25.

That was enough for the White Sox to make a change.

“It’s just one of those things how we’re doing so well and he didn’t get a win. That’s just the way it goes sometimes,” Todd Frazier said. “I’m sure he could’ve came around in his next start or maybe the next one after that. But he’s a bulldog.

“He’s a guy that wants to contribute and he has. He’s done it for years and just cause he hasn’t gotten a win in the first three or four starts that he’s had doesn’t signify what he’s done in the past.”

The success Danks had in the past convinced the White Sox to sign him to a five-year, $65 million contract extension prior to the 2012 season.

Danks struggled to find consistency with his game from 2012-16, going 25-48 with a 4.92 ERA in 97 starts.

His results ultimately proved that he didn’t live up to his contract.

But off the field, the impact he had on his teammates is something you can’t put a price on.

“Everybody loves him, he’s a great teammate, he’s a great pitcher,” catcher Dioner Navarro said. “Just going through a tough stretch right now. Part of life, I guess it’s part of him going home, reflecting on things and seeing what he wants to do.”

When Frazier arrived to Chicago during the offseason after being acquired by the Cincinnati Reds, Danks was one of the guys who helped him get acclimated to the Windy City.

“We became real close quick,” Frazier said. “Great guy. We’re about the same age. He came up a lot earlier than me. I know he’s had some really good years. Just one of those guys you really look up to. We’re gonna miss him. I’m especially gonna miss him.

“He kind of taught me a little bit about the Chicago Way. He’s just one of those guys who’s going to be in the back of your mind a little bit every couple days just thinking about how he’s doing.”

In addition, Danks used his experience to mentor young players like 23-year-old starter Carlos Rodon. The two would often hang out most of the time during games, and sometimes away from the diamond.

“It was huge,” Rodon said of Danks’ presence. “A veteran like that, you'd figure a young guy coming here, kind of would ignore him or wouldn't really be around for him. He was different, a different guy. He took me under his wing and taught me a lot of stuff about this game.”

For the White Sox, the clubhouse will be a bit unusual not having that familiar face that’s been around for so many years.

But as the White Sox learned earlier this season, adapting to change is something that comes with the game.

“The game will go on, but our thoughts and prayers go out to him, his wife and his future family,” Adam Eaton said. “Saying goodbye to him was tough for all of us, but like I said it's part of the game. It's sad to see him go.”