Twins take Doyle in Rule 5 Draft

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Twins take Doyle in Rule 5 Draft

In the biggest transaction news of the day around Major League Baseball, the Minnesota Twins selected Terry Doyle from the White Sox in Thursday's Rule 5 Draft.

Doyle, 26, compiled a 3.07 ERA over 173 innings between Single-A Winston-Salem and Double-A Birmingham last season with 122 strikeouts, 33 walks and 11 home runs allowed. He put up some fine numbers in the Arizona Fall League as well, but there shouldn't be an consternation about losing Doyle, even to a division rival.

First of all, if the Sox indeed lose Doyle, it'll mean Minnesota kept him on their 25-man roster throughout the 2012 season. In other words, they'd keep a guy who has only thrown 100 innings above Single-A on their MLB roster. Or, in other words, the Twins would be incredibly thin on pitching next season.

Secondly, Doyle is hardly a major loss, despite those nice minor league numbers. Baseball Prospectus' Kevin Goldstein had this to say about Doyle when asked back in October:

"Big, big dude. Classic frame, but not much stuff. Upper 80s fastball that scrapes 90-92 at times, better pitch is a mid-80s cutter with some bite. Average curveball and change. He succeeds by hitting his spots and working low in the zone, but there are plenty of questions, and understandably so, about his ability to miss the bats of more advanced hitters. Perfect world is probably middle relief."

And, as Larry points out, Rule 5 picks are rarely worth anything to their team.

The most interesting news is that Jordan Danks was not selected Thursday, as he appeared to be the unprotected Sox player with the best shot of sticking with a potential selecting team. He'll stay with the Sox, barring a trade.

White Sox 'impressed' with rookie Tim Anderson's start

White Sox 'impressed' with rookie Tim Anderson's start

Aside from Todd Frazier’s desire for a more vocal presence on the field, Tim Anderson’s play has brought few complaints so far.

The White Sox top prospect has flashed ridiculous speed, good hands and a strong arm at shortstop, and his aggressive bat has already made an impact. What’s more, the organization is more than satisfied with the maturity displayed by the 2013 first-round pick and his desire to improve.

To say the least, Anderson is off to a good start with the White Sox, who open a three-game series at Houston on Friday night.

“I've been impressed with Timmy,” manager Robin Ventura said. “He's a very confident kid. He's quiet, but there's some confidence and some inner-drive. He's not a showboat guy. He just goes out and plays and he's a hard-nosed kid.”

Anderson is hitting .314/.322/.512 with 10 extra-base hits, five RBIs and two stolen bases in his first 19 games. He has multiple hits in 10 contests, which is the most by a White Sox rookie through 19 games since Gus Zernial in 1949. Anderson also has produced three Defensive Runs Saved and is 0.7 Wins Above Replacement in his short time in the majors.

It hasn’t all been easy.

He struck out twice with the bases loaded late in a one-run loss at the Boston Red Sox on June 23. He also endured a 1-for-12 span almost immediately after he was promoted to the majors. And he has struck out 28 times in 88 plate appearances, a rate of 31.1 percent.

But even when he struggles, teammates say Anderson’s mood — quiet, upbeat and determined — has stayed the same.

“With Timmy doing what he’s doing, it’s nice to watch,” third baseman Todd Frazier said. “I was telling Rick Renteria in the dugout, he doesn’t change one bit whether he’s bad or good. That’s the sign of a really great athlete.”

The ability to adapt has helped Anderson develop quickly.

[RELATED: Tim Anderson draws first walk of career]

One of the knocks on Anderson has always been that his tools are raw because he didn’t start to play until his junior year at Hillcrest High in Tuscaloosa, Alabama. With only four years of baseball experience when he was drafted, the White Sox expected to take their time with Anderson. Before this season, general manager Rick Hahn said Anderson might need all season at Triple-A Charlotte to refine his game.

But Anderson forced their hand.

“He's come a long way in the last couple years as far as just his instinctual stuff on the field and the inner timing of everything, that baseball clock in your mind,” Ventura said. “He's got it on spot.

“Just the ball off the bat, his reactions, his first step quickness. The first thing you really notice is how he moves. He's been great.”

Frazier agrees. He calls Anderson a catalyst at the top of the lineup as the White Sox have averaged 4.7 runs per game with him in the lineup. The team is 10-9 since Anderson arrived.

Frazier’s only point of contention with Anderson is in the field. But it’s all part of Frazier having fun with the rookie — “I bust his chops a lot,” he said.

“He doesn’t say much,” Frazier said. “I wish he would talk some more in the infield.

“Tell me if a guy’s stealing or not. Little things like that.”

Asked about Frazier’s ribbing on Thursday, Anderson started to smile. He recounted how the veteran informed him that the club planned to set aside the umpire, the pitcher and the ball for safe keeping after Anderson drew the first walk of his career.

Though he didn’t know what to expect at first, Anderson has started to find more comfort at the big league level. As for the on field-chatter with Frazier, that’s a work in progress.

“We are going to work on that,” Anderson said. “It’s coming.”

White Sox promote Carlos Sanchez, place Matt Davidson on disabled list

White Sox promote Carlos Sanchez, place Matt Davidson on disabled list

The White Sox promoted Carlos Sanchez on Friday and placed Matt Davidson on the 15-day disabled list with a broken right foot.

The starting second baseman in 2015, Sanchez has appeared in 11 games for the White Sox this season. He’s hitting .154 with one RBI in 29 plate appearances. Sanchez was hitting .258/.313/.413 at Triple-A Charlotte with six homers and 24 RBIs.

Davidson became the most recent White Sox casualty when he broke a bone in his foot running the bases in his season debut on Thursday. The third baseman singled in a run and scored but injured himself somewhere in between.

Acquired in a trade for Addison Reed in December 2013, Davidson was in the midst of his best season at Triple-A. He was named an International League All-Star earlier this week and was promoted to the big leagues on Thursday. 

White Sox draft pick Zack Collins wins Johnny Bench Award

White Sox draft pick Zack Collins wins Johnny Bench Award

This June just keeps getting better and better for Zack Collins.

Collins was selected by the White Sox with the No. 10 pick in the MLB Draft, made it to the College World Series with the University of Miami, signed his first professional contract and now he is the Johnny Bench Award winner.

The Johnny Bench Award was created in 2000 and is given to the top college catcher in Division 1. Previous winners include Buster Posey and Kurt Suzuki.

Collins already had a haul of first-team All-America honors from Baseball America, D1Baseball, the NCBWA, Perfect Game and Rawlings.

Collins hit .363 with 16 home runs, 59 RBIs and a .668 slugging percentage. He also led the nation with 78 walks this season for the Hurricanes, which went 0-2 at the College World Series. Collins started 62 of 64 Miami games and made 59 of those starts at catcher.