Ventura highway about to open

654802.png

Ventura highway about to open

GLENDALE, Ariz. -- Everyones gotta start somewhere.

Thats how Chris Sale explained the debut of his new manager Robin Ventura, who arrived at Camelback Ranch on Wednesday about to embark on quite the unexpected journey, hired to manage the White Sox despite not managing or even coaching in any sport at any level.

Truth be told, Ventura actually does have some coaching experience on his resume.
He once coached his daughters basketball team in California. Oh, and there was the time he led a ragtag group of aging amateurs at the White Sox fantasy baseball camp at this exact same facility two years ago.

How bad were they?

We stunk, Ventura said.

But when Kenny Williams shocked everybody by hiring the former White Sox third baseman to replace Ozzie Guillen this off-season, Williams didnt care that Ventura had coached as many professional games as just about everybody reading this sentence.

Why?

Because Ventura is not like everybody.

Its the reason he had a 58-game hitting streak for Oklahoma State in 1987. It had never happened in Division I baseball before. It hasnt happened since.

Its why he charged the mound in 1993 against 46-year-old and future Hall of Famer Nolan Ryan, who proceeded to pound Ventura with several noogies to the head.
Probably not a smart move, but it shows the quiet, inner rage that can boil in his stomach. He might not show it, but its there. Expect to see it.

And its also why at the end of his playing career with the Dodgers, Venturas teammates gave him a nickname that foreshadowed his baseball future.

What was it?

Ploach.

Short for player-coach.

But while Ventura held that title quietly behind the scenes with no one watching, its a much different situation now. Hes now been thrust to the front of the stage with Chicagos blinding media spotlight directed right at him.

Few can effectively handle it. Ventura, like Ozzie Guillen before him, learned to play the game while living in it.

Not having Guillen around for the first time since 2003 will be an adjustment. Walking into the Sox clubhouse on Wednesday, something didnt seem right. I couldnt figure it out. Then I realized there wasnt a single profanity-laced tirade by a certain Venezuelan manager.

The silence was deafening.

Certainly from that standpoint, Ventura walks into this situation with some pretty large shoes to fill. Hes also taking over for the only manager alive who won a World Series title in Chicago.

I dont look at it necessarily as Im replacing him, Ventura said. I can only look at it as Im just happy to be in this position with the White Sox.

In a season that will feature many firsts, Wednesday was Venturas first spring training
press conference. The first-time manager gave us a glimpse at how he will act in his new job, and what he will expect from his players.

I do have things I believe in as far as the way they play, Ventura said.

Which will have to be a 180-degree shift from last year when the Sox struggled out of the gate and finished a disappointing 79-83. Ventura can help steer the season in the right direction, but he wont be the only person with his hands on the wheel.

Hopefully guys can play better. Thats obviously something from last year," Ventura said. "Thats just the situation were in, and nobody is going to let them up from that until you have an extended period of playing well and guys playing well. Thats just the facts. Thats just the way it is. We have a long way to go to kind of prove that wrong.

Ventura cant swing the bat for Adam Dunn, Alex Rios or Gordon Beckham. Thats not his job. But helping them get to the right place mentally to succeed? That is. Ventura knows it all begins here at spring training.

I think theres always a tone you open up with, the Sox manager said. I dont think you can force it on them. Your leadership and your club is going to kind of set that tone. Its about being prepared to win games, and thats really the focus of how were going to do things, and do it right. And thats it. Its pretty simple.

With the Dodgers he might have been the unofficial player-coach. But will he be a players coach?

Asked about running the club like a dictatorship, Ventura quipped, Absolutely. My way or the highway.

Tomorrow the journey begins.

Rick Hahn: White Sox 'still thoroughly, deeply engaged' in trade talks as meetings close

Rick Hahn: White Sox 'still thoroughly, deeply engaged' in trade talks as meetings close

NATIONAL HARBOR, Md. -- The White Sox have a pair of relievers to dangle and have become increasingly busier with two of three free-agent closers off the board.

Prior to leaving the Winter Meetings on Thursday, White Sox general manager Rick Hahn was asked if a pool of relievers including closer David Robertson and setup man Nate Jones had drawn much interest.

Having already traded Chris Sale and Adam Eaton, it’s believed the White Sox are willing to part with most anyone if the price is right. It sounds as if that possibility has improved after the Yankees’ late night signing of Aroldis Chapman on Wednesday, two days after the San Francisco Giants signed Mark Melancon. With only Kenley Jansen still left in free agency and due a big salary, Robertson, who has two years and $25 million left on his deal, could solve several teams’ relief needs. Jones is also a draw with potentially five years left on his current team-friendly deal, which includes two club options and one mutual option for 2021.

[SHOP: Gear up, White Sox fans!]

“We’ve had a lot of interesting conversations on a number of different fronts involving are players,” Hahn said. “And yes, we still have reliever pieces and starting pieces that are appealing to various teams throughout the league. I don’t think anything is going to happen between now and the time I go pick up my bags and head to the airport. But still thoroughly engaged, deeply engaged on a number of different fronts.”

Despite adding five pitchers and two position players through their first two moves, the White Sox still have a long list of desires. That list potentially includes a long-term starting catcher and another big bat among others.

White Sox add pitcher Dylan Covey in Rule 5 draft

White Sox add pitcher Dylan Covey in Rule 5 draft

NATIONAL HARBOR, Md. — The White Sox added another young pitcher on Thursday when they selected right-hander Dylan Covey in the Rule 5 draft.

Covey, formerly the No. 20 prospect in the Oakland A’s farm system, missed all but six starts of the 2016 regular season after he sustained an oblique injury. A fourth-round selection in 2013, Covey also made six starts in the Arizona Fall League, compiling a 4.74 ERA in 24 2/3 innings. He is the sixth pitcher added by the White Sox at the Winter Meetings this week, including five acquired in the trades for Chris Sale and Adam Eaton.

White Sox general manager Rick Hahn said Covey, who must stay on the major league roster the entire season or would potentially be offered back to Oakland, can compete for a spot in the bullpen or even the team’s rotation.

“Interesting kid,” Hahn said. “Up to 95 with some sink. Four-pitch mix. Obviously, he’s not a finished product. But we think he has a chance to compete for a spot in our bullpen or possibly even in the rotation. Long term he has starter potential and we’ll just have to wait and see how he looks when he gets to Glendale. But interesting arm and we’re interested in adding as much talent as we can to the organization.”

[SHOP: Gear up, White Sox fans!]

The White Sox added a bevy of prospects in the previous two days, including MLB.com’s top-ranked position player (Yoan Moncada) and pitcher (Lucas Giolito). The haul also includes talented pitchers Michael Kopech and Reynaldo Lopez, among others.

“It’s a weird feeling,” Hahn said. “Mixed emotions. You never like parting ways with stalwarts on this roster like Chris Sale and Adam Eaton. At the same time, we had a plan that we know is going to take some time and it’s nice to feel good about the first steps in that plan and the return which we received.”

Originally selected in the first round of the 2010 draft by the Milwaukee Brewers, Covey opted for college after he was diagnosed with Diabetes. Covey played alongside Cubs star Kris Bryant for three seasons (2011-13) and White Sox farmhand Louie Lechich at the University of San Diego before Oakland drafted him in 2013.

Covey was limited to six regular season starts in 2016 at Double-A Midland after his oblique injury. He finished 2-1 with a 1.84 ERA in 29 1/3 innings.